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1 hour ago, t-b-g said:

My recollection of Bristol Models products were that they were best avoided if possible.

 

Crude, badly designed and in some cases impossible to build without alteration.

 

Somebody once offered Roy Jackson an unbuilt kit. I can't remember if it was a B1 or a V2. His was response was to offer thanks and to say that he would melt it down to use as weight in a decent model.

 

Somebody once called them " the worst kits ever" but I think they were no worse than some from McGowan or MTK (cast)  Jidenco (etched).

Thanks Tony,

 

It looks like I've just forked-out 20 quid for some ballast.

 

How much lead would I get for £20.00?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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Hornby’s Stembok, 61032 (not 39) was an excellent source of B1s, especially as it was sold off cheap for a while and didn’t have the name attached making it easier to renumber. Here is my version, renumbered to Hitchin regular 61097.

 

419A4089-5B5A-4D25-8154-DCDDC272429F.jpeg.98b3d86c4b68bef63795d92f1f24991f.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tony,

 

It looks like I've just forked-out 20 quid for some ballast.

 

How much lead would I get for £20.00?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

If you got a runner out of a Millholme 4MT, a McGowan D9 and  BEC D11 you should be fine with it!

 

I am not going to join in the gearbox discussion this time around. I said all I had to say last time. All I will say is that if High Level Gearboxes require perfect assembly, how come mine work? I have never achieved perfection yet and I am pretty sure that I never will.

 

 

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Tony,

 

A question on the DJH/High level gearbox debate.  Are the DJH ones put together in a factory by a machine?  I'm wondering if the reason they run sweetly is that they don't have the inaccuracies that might creep in, particularly from the less skillful, in manual assembly?

 

David

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34 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tony,

 

It looks like I've just forked-out 20 quid for some ballast.

 

How much lead would I get for £20.00?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

About half a church roof in some parts of the country, I would guess.....

 

Rob

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There was some discussion recently about whether there's any value in old Lima, or who would bother with it now.

 

The Lima 08 was the only half-way decent looking model of its prototype, and my model is now well over 40 years old. It never ran well but since I wanted an 08, I spent a bit of time detailing it. You probably wouldn't bother now as the Bachmann and Hornby models are streets ahead, both with detail and cab proportions, but in the spirit of I'll started, so I'll finish ...

 

My 08 has been treated to a new ex-CD drive motor, which cost me less than ten pounds including postage and a motor mount. It's  simple swap-in for the Lima unit and retains the gearing and wheels of the original. It makes a huge difference to the running, being both quieter, and much more capable of slow stops and starts. I thinned down the coupling rods and lowered the body on the chassis by about 1mm, which is easily done just by trimming a little plastic here and there. Incidentally, even with the Lima wheels and flanges, it seems fine on C+L and Peco bullhead track.

 

 

 

 

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Re building Jidenco wagon kits, yes some can be built into a decent model, but the first hurdle to cross is that as supplied for vans and CCTs the sides are full length and the ends full width so the don’t fold up into a box! The solution is to break off the ends, trim, clean up and then solder to the folded up sides. The etches were drawn out by a person who had no concept of assembly. 
The under frames and castings can usually be consigned to the bin.

 

David

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1 hour ago, t-b-g said:

 

If you got a runner out of a Millholme 4MT, a McGowan D9 and  BEC D11 you should be fine with it!

 

I am not going to join in the gearbox discussion this time around. I said all I had to say last time. All I will say is that if High Level Gearboxes require perfect assembly, how come mine work? I have never achieved perfection yet and I am pretty sure that I never will.

 

 

I did qualify 'perfectly' by putting it into inverted commas, Tony.

 

Meaning, nothing is perfect. 

 

Yours work because of your skill-level, expertise and experience. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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1 hour ago, Clearwater said:

Tony,

 

A question on the DJH/High level gearbox debate.  Are the DJH ones put together in a factory by a machine?  I'm wondering if the reason they run sweetly is that they don't have the inaccuracies that might creep in, particularly from the less skillful, in manual assembly?

 

David

David,

 

Though I'm not entirely sure, I believe the DJH 'boxes are assembled at the factory by one highly-skilled person (I think, female; not that that should make any difference). They're probably put together using some form of jig; resulting in the inherent accuracy, but, at a price. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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4 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Very-natural, Dylan,

 

Tom Foster's work?

 

Exactly as I remember seeing most B1s. 

 

Just one thing (there always is with me!), please junk those dreadful Hornby bogie wheels. When you come down here soon, I'll give you a replacement Markits set!

 

Regards,

 

Tony.

That's very kind of you Tony! I'll make sure to bring her.

 

Of course! Superb work as always.

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Hello everyone, 

 

I wonder, may i ask a question with reference to soldering technique please? 

I consider myself fairly proficient at soldering although I'm certainly not an expert, i can successfully solder layout wiring, brass etch, nickel silver and whitemetal but as seperate entities, for example, whitemetal bus kits, brass etch and nickel silver for experimenting with signals, and layout wiring, all of which i enjoy doing, i have a cheap seperate temperature controlled soldering station for whitemetal and only use it for that purpose as i have set the knob exactly where i need it for 70 degree solder! 

I have a more powerful soldering station for brass and nickel silver and a portable 25w Antex for electrical work, however, i have never tried soldering whitemetal to brass etch before, i have a couple of Roxey Mouldings coach kits that i would like to build which consist of both materials. 

Will 70 degree solder suffice or will that not enable the whitemetal to 'stick' to the brass please? 

 

Thank you, in anticipation, 

 

Jim. 

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3 minutes ago, Jeepy said:

Hello everyone, 

 

I wonder, may i ask a question with reference to soldering technique please? 

I consider myself fairly proficient at soldering although I'm certainly not an expert, i can successfully solder layout wiring, brass etch, nickel silver and whitemetal but as seperate entities, for example, whitemetal bus kits, brass etch and nickel silver for experimenting with signals, and layout wiring, all of which i enjoy doing, i have a cheap seperate temperature controlled soldering station for whitemetal and only use it for that purpose as i have set the knob exactly where i need it for 70 degree solder! 

I have a more powerful soldering station for brass and nickel silver and a portable 25w Antex for electrical work, however, i have never tried soldering whitemetal to brass etch before, i have a couple of Roxey Mouldings coach kits that i would like to build which consist of both materials. 

Will 70 degree solder suffice or will that not enable the whitemetal to 'stick' to the brass please? 

 

Thank you, in anticipation, 

 

Jim. 

I hasten to add that use Rosin flux mostly or Hobby Holidays 'no clean' flux for electrical work, i also possess some 9% phosphorus acid flux but have never used it! 

 

Thank you, 

 

Best wishes, 

 

Jim. 

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2 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

There was some discussion recently about whether there's any value in old Lima, or who would bother with it now.

 

The Lima 08 was the only half-way decent looking model of its prototype, and my model is now well over 40 years old. It never ran well but since I wanted an 08, I spent a bit of time detailing it. You probably wouldn't bother now as the Bachmann and Hornby models are streets ahead, both with detail and cab proportions, but in the spirit of I'll started, so I'll finish ...

 

My 08 has been treated to a new ex-CD drive motor, which cost me less than ten pounds including postage and a motor mount. It's  simple swap-in for the Lima unit and retains the gearing and wheels of the original. It makes a huge difference to the running, being both quieter, and much more capable of slow stops and starts. I thinned down the coupling rods and lowered the body on the chassis by about 1mm, which is easily done just by trimming a little plastic here and there. Incidentally, even with the Lima wheels and flanges, it seems fine on C+L and Peco bullhead track.

 

 

 

 

Lima locos may be crude but they have a robust-ness that a lot of newer models lack.  Obviously they lack some details now considered a normal basic level, but it's easier to forgive yourself making a mistake adding the details to a sub-£20 Lima diesel than the latest £120 equivalent.  

Running-wise, I've certainly heard of many more stories of 21st Century locos whose running has deteriorated below an acceptable level, than 1980s/90s Lima.  The older models aren't smooth (and if the gear mesh is poor, ear-splitting!) but they run for ever.

Lima's steam loco models were pretty good (dimensionally) above the running plate, somewhere between poor and abysmal below it, but like my Lima 08s, I have a couple that I cherish as the locos of my youth.  Some of them were my earliest repainting attempts; not sure I want to share images of those on this thread.....

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29 minutes ago, Jeepy said:

Hello everyone, 

 

I wonder, may i ask a question with reference to soldering technique please? 

I consider myself fairly proficient at soldering although I'm certainly not an expert, i can successfully solder layout wiring, brass etch, nickel silver and whitemetal but as seperate entities, for example, whitemetal bus kits, brass etch and nickel silver for experimenting with signals, and layout wiring, all of which i enjoy doing, i have a cheap seperate temperature controlled soldering station for whitemetal and only use it for that purpose as i have set the knob exactly where i need it for 70 degree solder! 

I have a more powerful soldering station for brass and nickel silver and a portable 25w Antex for electrical work, however, i have never tried soldering whitemetal to brass etch before, i have a couple of Roxey Mouldings coach kits that i would like to build which consist of both materials. 

Will 70 degree solder suffice or will that not enable the whitemetal to 'stick' to the brass please? 

 

Thank you, in anticipation, 

 

Jim. 

Hi Jim,

the trick is to tin the brass with your usual solder (145 deg?) first and then use low melt to solder the white metal to the tinned brass (or n/silver)…

Good luck!

Frank

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Or you can also use 100 degree solder which "sticks" to both brass and whitemetal, tend to keep the iron on the brass side and let it flow to the whitemetal with the flux.

 

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8 minutes ago, Chuffer Davies said:

Hi Jim,

the trick is to tin the brass with your usual solder (145 deg?) first and then use low melt to solder the white metal to the tinned brass (or n/silver)…

Good luck!

Frank

Ahh! That makes sense! Thanks ever so much Frank, when i next get a chance i will experiment with some scraps of brass and whitemetal using the method you mention, i use flux cored 60/40 for electrical but i do possess a packet of 145 degree solder and a packet of 188 degree solder, i shall try with the 145 to start with and see how i get on, I just didn't want to perhaps ruin the kits experimenting and end up with a blob of whitemetal that used to be a suspension component or something! I do really enjoy 'playing' with soldering though, thanks again! 

 

Best wishes, 

 

Jim. 

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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks Tony,

 

It looks like I've just forked-out 20 quid for some ballast.

 

How much lead would I get for £20.00?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Perhaps regard it as a challenge - a sponsored TW build to raise funds for CRUK?  If so then you can count me in.....

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3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I did qualify 'perfectly' by putting it into inverted commas, Tony.

 

Meaning, nothing is perfect. 

 

Yours work because of your skill-level, expertise and experience. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

The thing I don't understand is why somebody with your skill and ability and your preference for making things yourself, spends twice as much on a ready made gearbox that sticks out like a sore thumb under the boiler of some of your smaller locos.

 

They really are not difficult to make. I have had complete novices put one together at Missenden with a "Come and see me if you get stuck" and half an hour later they come to show me a finished, smooth running box, done with no help at all.

 

I don't understand why you regard then as requiring skill. Which bit do you mean? The two folds in the metal frame? Putting in the bearings? Or putting the gears on the shafts?

 

That is really all there is to them.

 

 

 

 

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53 minutes ago, t-b-g said:

 

The thing I don't understand is why somebody with your skill and ability and your preference for making things yourself, spends twice as much on a ready made gearbox that sticks out like a sore thumb under the boiler of some of your smaller locos.

 

They really are not difficult to make. I have had complete novices put one together at Missenden with a "Come and see me if you get stuck" and half an hour later they come to show me a finished, smooth running box, done with no help at all.

 

I don't understand why you regard then as requiring skill. Which bit do you mean? The two folds in the metal frame? Putting in the bearings? Or putting the gears on the shafts?

 

That is really all there is to them.

 

 

 

 

That's all that is required for most etched frame gearboxes but some people still get it wrong. I think it is a lack of what my old Physics Teacher called "uncommon sense". Too often people don't "think" about what has gone wrong when something doesn't work properly.

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1 hour ago, polybear said:

 

Perhaps regard it as a challenge - a sponsored TW build to raise funds for CRUK?  If so then you can count me in.....

Throw in a swear box and we’ll make thousands…

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2 hours ago, ScRSG said:

Or you can also use 100 degree solder which "sticks" to both brass and whitemetal, tend to keep the iron on the brass side and let it flow to the whitemetal with the flux.

 

Ahh! Another experiment to play with..... I get the feeling that may require a bit more care but well worth trying with the scrap material first if i can aquire some 100 degree solder, some fun experiments coming up! Thank you! 

 

Best wishes, 

 

Jim. 

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Mayflower, a loco I cabbed many times.  Bachmann late model body and chassis.  Rather than making a new chassis for a 'detailed' old Bachmann body on an old split frame chassis as you do Tony, i just replace the split chassis with the new chassis.   I do now have several tenders and bodies though.  Re the tender coal backplate when I was researching my Mayflower conversion I found it in both positions depending on the loco even on later totems based on photographs.

1195242966_Mayflower-1.jpg.3558cd27741fff5a612ee9a57cdbfc33.jpg

Edited by Theakerr
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, t-b-g said:

 

The thing I don't understand is why somebody with your skill and ability and your preference for making things yourself, spends twice as much on a ready made gearbox that sticks out like a sore thumb under the boiler of some of your smaller locos.

 

They really are not difficult to make. I have had complete novices put one together at Missenden with a "Come and see me if you get stuck" and half an hour later they come to show me a finished, smooth running box, done with no help at all.

 

I don't understand why you regard then as requiring skill. Which bit do you mean? The two folds in the metal frame? Putting in the bearings? Or putting the gears on the shafts?

 

That is really all there is to them.

 

 

 

 

When we next meet up Tony (if ever allowed) I'll show you a loco built with a High-Level 'box. Make sure you bring your ear defenders! 

 

The builder is not a novice, and the loco is very well-built (visually). 

 

If you see it, perhaps you'll explain, please, where he's gone wrong. 

 

I have one DJH-powered loco with a 'sore thumb'. If I use a DJH 'box now in, say, an 0-6-0 I drive off the rear axle. It requires a wee bit of metal removed off the bottom of the backhead, but by the time it's crewed, the 'box is all but invisible.  

 

539497605_SEFinecastJ664236.jpg.9de5d8800f8d546666a9a54ebdc15b20.jpg

 

The sore thumb! 

 

'Stung' by your criticisms (which were broadcast for all to read), I resolved to 'do better'.

 

102955420_J664178weatheredonlayout02.jpg.82c2d9639e8ea5008a9166de040e4701.jpg

 

So, in the next J6 build.............................. In fairness, I think this has a Comet 'box/Mashima combo (I forget), but the principle of 'invisibility' is the same. 

 

 

 

1092786937_Nu-CastSEFJ6scratchchassis04.jpg.0dfc9955b2ceb13ef6b8c873ae5c60e2.jpg

 

And the next one. It's easier to see (or not see) in this shot. 

 

1368661897_J17weathered02.jpg.d8505f40cc0a52609b199a4bdece443c.jpg

 

I haven't come across an into-cab shot of one of my J6s, but I hope this J17 illustrates what I mean; being powered by a DJH AM10. 

 

If I may sum up, please?

 

DJH 'boxes are 'expensive' and potentially-visible in smaller prototypes. At the same time they're ready-made, take minutes to install and always (in my experience) run 'perfectly'.

 

High-Level 'boxes are superbly-engineered, are far cheaper than DJH's and beginners can make them, so that they also run 'perfectly'. However, for whatever reason (and this applies to all fold-up, make-yourself gearboxes in my experience) they can be assembled so that 'perfection' is not achieved.

 

I understand (and, I hope, respect) everything you say, and your constructive criticisms and observations are always taken on board. I also understand (seeing how I 'road-tested' the latest DJH motor/gearbox combinations) that I might appear to have a 'vested interest'. That said, I tested the new 'boxes by building locomotives around them - in the case of the AM9 (the big one) inside an A1 and in the case of the AM10 (the small one) inside a K1. Both performed (and continue to do so) perfectly, and they both run on Little Bytham (a V2, similarly-equipped with an AM9, now runs on Retford). I hope folk realise I will never recommend a product unless I'm thoroughly happy with it, and, in these cases use it (them) and continue to do so. 

 

I'll recommend High-Level 'boxes as well. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

 

 

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1 hour ago, Theakerr said:

Mayflower, a loco I cabbed many times.  Bachmann late model body and chassis.  Rather than making a new chassis for a 'detailed' old Bachmann body on an old split frame chassis as you do Tony, i just replace the split chassis with the new chassis.   I do now have several tenders and bodies though.  Re the tender coal backplate when I was researching my Mayflower conversion I found it in both positions depending on the loco even on later totems based on photographs.

1195242966_Mayflower-1.jpg.3558cd27741fff5a612ee9a57cdbfc33.jpg

Very nice.

 

I once made the foolish assumption (when writing captions for BRILL) that if a B1 had the later device on the tender, the rear coal division plate would be moved forward. Wrong! The same is true for V2s. 

 

I think it's safe to state (or is it?) that any B1 in LNER days would have a tender with the coal division plate towards the rear, spanning the pick-up dome. 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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