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Wright writes.....


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6 hours ago, gr.king said:

I'm tempted to wonder when charitable behaviour goes so far as to become a rod for your own back.

 

The old adage  "no good deed goes unpunished" springs to mind....

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3 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

An interesting 'comparison'?

 

1210156373_OxfordJ2701.jpg.aff4112d119afa862cb43023f3bc5335.jpg

 

I've just received the latest Oxford Rail J27 for photography and review. 

 

First impressions are of a very fine model indeed. 

 

By way of a comparison...................

 

907051367_BradwellJ27.jpg.64ba82bd75a70990fb929ef853ee67b6.jpg

 

This is the Bradwell J27 (in OO Gauge) which I've just sold on behalf of a widow (builder unknown; of the loco, not the widow!).

 

It's beautifully-made, entirely-natural and an excellent runner.

 

However, though its running is a of a very high order (it's fully-compensated and Portescap-powered), it's no better than the RTR one (which is neither compensated nor P-P). In fact, because of its Portescap, it's not as quiet. 

 

On test, both will haul prototype-equivalent-weight/length trains, smoothly and without fuss. Both are superb models in their own right, and in their own sphere. The main difference (other than one is hand-built and made of metal) is that one can get more than five of the RTR ones for the same price! 

 

There's no doubt which one I prefer. The metal one has a 'presence' which the plastic one can never equal, even if expertly detailed and weathered. It's 'finer' in every way and the product of individual craftsmanship rather than a distant factory. But, if your layout needs several J27s........................

 

 

Tony

I have heard that the Oxford Rail model is a good runner. It looks as though the smoke box door and chimney shapes (around the rim) are somewhat different.

Here is a view of the preserved:

image.png.4476dd790c2adcc3bd7428aeafb0d55f.png

Still is very good value for money.

Dave

Edited by zr2498
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5 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

Just throwing a bit of non-railway modelling into WW for variety, as I know we all like a bit of iconic post-war British engineering.

 

This an Airfix Hawker Hunter under construction. It's a really lovely kit and captures the beautifully proportioned lines of this early jet

very nicely. Hunters were well-known for making the "blue note", a sort of droning air-raid siren noise, supposedly due to the airflow interacting with the gun-ports.

 

hawker2.jpg.3c644913a64e0b5697e292bedccf3661.jpg

 

 

 

 

The very best 50’s aircraft of all!

 

Is the blue note gun port generated?   I thought it was intake noise for certain versions of Avon?  Similarly with the Olympus engines on the Vulcan.   The whistle from P51s is gun port noise …..

 

Model looks good!    What scale is it?

Edited by PupCam
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5 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

Just throwing a bit of non-railway modelling into WW for variety, as I know we all like a bit of iconic post-war British engineering.

 

This an Airfix Hawker Hunter under construction. It's a really lovely kit and captures the beautifully proportioned lines of this early jet

very nicely. Hunters were well-known for making the "blue note", a sort of droning air-raid siren noise, supposedly due to the airflow interacting with the gun-ports.

 

hawker2.jpg.3c644913a64e0b5697e292bedccf3661.jpg

 

 

 

 

Ahhhhh: Airfix aircraft kits... happy days :)

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48 minutes ago, PupCam said:

The very best 50’s aircraft of all!

 

Is the blue note gun port generated?   I thought it was intake noise for certain versions of Avon?  Similarly with the Olympus engines on the Vulcan.   The whistle from P51s is gun port noise …..

 

Model looks good!    What scale is it?

 

IIRC, to get a good blue note from a Hunter you had to be flying a Mk. 6 or 9, doing about 450 - 480 knots then throttle back to idle to get the right airflow around the gun barrels and ammunition link collectors (or 'Sabrinas') as well as reducing the engine noise. It didn't always work but when it did it was spectacular.

 

Dave (ex late 1960s Hunter driver)

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9 minutes ago, Dave Hunt said:

 

IIRC, to get a good blue note from a Hunter you had to be flying a Mk. 6 or 9, doing about 450 - 480 knots then throttle back to idle to get the right airflow around the gun barrels and ammunition link collectors (or 'Sabrinas') as well as reducing the engine noise. It didn't always work but when it did it was spectacular.

 

Dave (ex late 1960s Hunter driver)

Ah!  That's a close to a definitive answer as we are going to get!   Thanks Dave.

 

I wish I'd have been able to have been a driver in the RAF.  

I had to make do with working on the "toys" for you boys which, I must say, did have its moments  :good:

 

Alan

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4 hours ago, Bernard Lamb said:

If you get a good one Tony.

See the horror stories on the Oxford thread.

Mine had front tender wheels that did not touch the rails, mine is not alone in this respect, while others were similar but bent so far that the pin for the draw bar had broken.

The pick ups were also a bit of tangled knitting in mine and as reported by several others.

Before people jump in about sending it back, I kept it as my supplier did not have any more.

In general it looks the part.

Bernard

 

Thanks Bernard,

 

I haven't looked on any threads about the Oxford J27. All I can say is that the one I've received appears to be perfect, with no tangled pick-ups and no issues with the drawbar.

 

Regards,

 

Tony.  

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6 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

Just throwing a bit of non-railway modelling into WW for variety, as I know we all like a bit of iconic post-war British engineering.

 

This an Airfix Hawker Hunter under construction. It's a really lovely kit and captures the beautifully proportioned lines of this early jet

very nicely. Hunters were well-known for making the "blue note", a sort of droning air-raid siren noise, supposedly due to the airflow interacting with the gun-ports.

 

hawker2.jpg.3c644913a64e0b5697e292bedccf3661.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

I was fortunate to work on the real thing a few times (XG210, which has sadly been demoted to a private garden ornament now - which is a real shame because I understand it was low hours).  The IPN start was always good for scaring the hell out of the unwary....

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4 hours ago, Headstock said:

 

This is more exciting than grocery shopping! Is there a buy on get one free offer?

I'd hope so Andrew,

 

I helped Mo with the shopping today and couldn't wait to get back to the 'exciting' J27.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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2 hours ago, PupCam said:

The very best 50’s aircraft of all!

 

Is the blue note gun port generated?   I thought it was intake noise for certain versions of Avon?  Similarly with the Olympus engines on the Vulcan.   The whistle from P51s is gun port noise …..

 

Model looks good!    What scale is it?

 

1/48th. All for a bit under 32 pounds so great value if you factor in the modelling time.

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2 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

I'd hope so Andrew,

 

I helped Mo with the shopping today and couldn't wait to get back to the 'exciting' J27.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Good evening Tony,

 

65845 is a beautiful bit of modelling, well worth battling the Corona zombies in the frozen food aisle for. I can't say that buying locomotives built by another modeler has much appeal to myself, though such quality as represented in 65845 would surely inspire my own efforts. What a shame that nothing of it's creator is know.

 

It is not my intention that any of my own modelling will survive me. Hopefully, it will fade away when I up stumps and retire to the Pavilion. If not, I may have to blow it up.

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The photo above of the preserved J27 shows the later more bulbous smokebox door. The LNER model has the earlier flatter NE smokebox door. Will be interesting to see what the BR models are fitted with?

 

My LNER model arrived last week and runs really well. Generally it looks pretty good. However, it did have a slightly bent drawbar which was easily fixed.

 

One issue is the cab windows which are slightly under scale size which makes then slightly too far apart.  Looking through Yeadon the chimney's appear to have capuchons early on which eventually disappeared. The height of the top rim on the later chimneys seems quite variable from photos.

 

One matter I'm currently seeking further advice on is the rivets on the smokebox. I don't believe they should be present on an LNER pre war model - but they can easily be removed and its understandable if they've only made one boiler/smokebox moulding.

 

Andrew 

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7 hours ago, Headstock said:

 

Good evening Tony,

 

65845 is a beautiful bit of modelling, well worth battling the Corona zombies in the frozen food aisle for. I can't say that buying locomotives built by another modeler has much appeal to myself, though such quality as represented in 65845 would surely inspire my own efforts. What a shame that nothing of it's creator is know.

 

It is not my intention that any of my own modelling will survive me. Hopefully, it will fade away when I up stumps and retire to the Pavilion. If not, I may have to blow it up.

Good morning Andrew,

 

Though there is provenance for some of the models (in some cases dating back over 40 years), sadly there is is nothing with the J27. It's obviously a much-later commission than some of the others, probably from the earlier years of this century (when did Dave Bradwell first introduce his J27?). It's certainly a far superior build, particularly mechanically, than some of the earlier models.

 

I, too, don't find much appeal in buying locos built by others, but there are a couple in this collection which are very tempting (again, later builds). I've actually made several examples of the same types, anyway, but these are better than my equivalent efforts. I do admit to buying several of Tony Geary's OO locos when he changed to O Gauge, but they have a touch of the personal about them (I know that sounds a bit sentimental, but you know what I mean). 

 

As to what happens to our models after we're gone...................... Because I have no belief in an afterlife (rewarded or condemned - the latter in my case), I really won't care two hoots. That said, it would be nice to think that any family 'survivors' would at least get some money for my 'collection', even if the market for it might be minute by then. What might be the future market for our kind of models (yours, to a higher standard)? Looking at the more-recent obituaries, an ever increasing supply and an ever decreasing demand! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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26 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Andrew,

 

Though there is provenance for some of the models (in some cases dating back over 40 years), sadly there is is nothing with the J27. It's obviously a much-later commission than some of the others, probably from the earlier years of this century (when did Dave Bradwell first introduce his J27?). It's certainly a far superior build, particularly mechanically, than some of the earlier models.

 

I, too, don't find much appeal in buying locos built by others, but there are a couple in this collection which are very tempting (again, later builds). I've actually made several examples of the same types, anyway, but these are better than my equivalent efforts. I do admit to buying several of Tony Geary's OO locos when he changed to O Gauge, but they have a touch of the personal about them (I know that sounds a bit sentimental, but you know what I mean). 

 

As to what happens to our models after we're gone...................... Because I have no belief in an afterlife (rewarded or condemned - the latter in my case), I really won't care two hoots. That said, it would be nice to think that any family 'survivors' would at least get some money for my 'collection', even if the market for it might be minute by then. What might be the future market for our kind of models (yours, to a higher standard)? Looking at the more-recent obituaries, an ever increasing supply and an ever decreasing demand! 

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

I would hope that LB might have the same fate as befell Retford and Buckingham, as one of those layouts that deserves to outlive their owner...  but surely that won’t need considering for a good while yet!

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3 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Tony,

 

Believe it or not, it's true. However, only with Mo.

 

About a month ago, she asked me if I'd go to our local Sainsbury's in Bourne, by myself mind! She was busy preparing for some food for some later guests, and just needed a few more items. She wrote a list (not long) which I diligently put in my pocket, and set off. On reaching the supermarket, guess what? I'd lost the list! No matter, I have a photographic memory. The problem is its as old as Fox Talbot! 

 

I selected a trolley, only to find on entering the supermarket that it was two, jammed together. It took an assistant's help to extricate my trolley from the other (they'd mated!), much to the amusement of other shoppers. I tried to remember what was on the list as I navigated the bewildering array of shelves. Tomatoes? Maybe? Other fruit, but what? Definitely bread, but it had to be 'posh'. What did that mean?

 

I think I remembered about half the list, but also bought Mo flowers (unfortunately, not the edible kind). On reaching the till, the kindly till-driver (a lovely lady) obviously took pity on me as I struggled to get the items into my bag. 'Do you have a loyalty card?'. 'What's that?'. 'Do you have any vouchers to redeem?' 'Vouchers?'.

 

I managed to at least insert the right card, but then got the PIN wrong (was it ST GATIEN and TRIGO or ST SIMON and WOOLWINDER?). Contactless didn't work, because I'd used the card already a few times. The queue behind me was growing! Eventually, I got the order of the A3s' last LNER numbers correct and got out as fast as I could. I thought I heard a comment along the lines of 'Care in the community never works, does it?' as I made my escape. 

 

Naturally, I found the list on the floor well in the car on my return to it. I was soundly scolded on getting home (though the pretty flowers were accepted in mitigation). Even the cat glared at me because I'd forgotten her 'Dreamies'! 

 

Never again, alone............

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

The tale sounds all too familiar…

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22 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Very kind of you to say so.............

 

However, did you ever see my early layouts? No? Pity, you might have changed your opinion.

 

Best regards,

 

Tony. 

Without wishing to sound too sycophantic Tony it was your photo of

an A1 rounding a curve with an assortment of coaching stock and

taken at low level which appeared in the 1983 RM which first struck

me how realistic a model railway could look. The usual style of

magazine photography at this time being the over used helicopter

shots. It did help that excepting anything originating from Swindon

A1's were my favourite locos. All the best to yourself and Mo.

 

Chris Knight

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22 hours ago, zr2498 said:

Tony

I have heard that the Oxford Rail model is a good runner. It looks as though the smoke box door and chimney shapes (around the rim) are somewhat different.

Here is a view of the preserved:

image.png.4476dd790c2adcc3bd7428aeafb0d55f.png

Still is very good value for money.

Dave

No merely an original NER type smokebox door rather than the later Doncaster? type. Great attention to detail.

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10 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Good effort , Tony. Now she won't ask you again.

Tried that tack, doesn't work, "ever mind, you'll get better with more practice" so had to go again!

 

Nigel L

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