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Wright writes.....


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5 minutes ago, Mike 84C said:

Thanks for all the paint stripping suggestions, for the L&Y 0-8-0, at the moment Dettol is working well on the paint. Tomorrow will tell if the Araldite has survived.

Works a treat doesn't it, and quite a bit cheaper than the model paint strippers. Might take a bit longer, but I can live with that. 

 

Nigel L

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3 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

16/20.

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3 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

Well, if we're all having a go ...

 

'No' to 7 and 15, otherwise 18/20. 13 a bit tenuous but a Mainline cattle wagon a full 40 years ago counts as per the description. Still got it.

I was going to say 'No' to 6 but then remembered that Tony has helped me out in hour of need, eg un-mangling a Shap Duchess valve gear at Glasgow show. Not because I couldn't do it, more because I had 101 other things to attend to at the time. So long as CRUK benefitted, that's the main thing. 

Edited by LNER4479
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3 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

No to 6. For 7 I can say at BRMA Conventions in Oz as we don't seem to have these at exhibitions much here. For 8 Dad took me in the early 60s before we left UK. No to 15 but its likely in next 12 months. No to 19 although at our last exhibition in Adelaide on the layout we exhibited the locos and other rollingstock was all mine, the scratchbuilt signal box was by me as were the working GN somersault signals.

Probably a pass?

Andrew

Edited by Woodcock29
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37 minutes ago, Woodcock29 said:

No to 6. For 7 I can say at BRMA Conventions in Oz as we don't seem to have these at exhibitions much here. For 8 Dad took me in the early 60s before we left UK. No to 15 but its likely in next 12 months. No to 19 although at our last exhibition in Adelaide on the layout we exhibited the locos and other rollingstock was all mine, the scratchbuilt signal box was by me as were the working GN somersault signals.

Probably a pass?

Andrew

Well, if Conventions count rather than shows per se then I can claim 17 not 16.

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8 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Thanks John,

 

I wonder (though might it always have been thus?) if we're seeing an 'alarming' rise in the number of models coming on to the market now; because there are more modellers dying that ever before? 

 

I can recall down the years, WMRC members helping out bereaved families, but not at this rate. I'm off next week to see yet another collection on behalf of a widow..........

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

Hi Tony,

Perhaps the word is getting around that you get a better price that many ebay sales achieve, take less (or comparable) commission, fix and test them first - and then do all the packing and posting (which I know from experience can be a right pain).    Take care - if those large emporiums paying seven quid a loco get to hear that you're moving in on their "action" they might just send take out a Contract on you....:jester:

Kind Regards,

Brian

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10 hours ago, Northmoor said:

 

 

I appreciate the list is not meant to be taken too seriously though.  I would add, "Cannot remember when they last built a model kit completely in accordance with the instructions".

That's an easy question - never.

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1 hour ago, polybear said:

 

Hi Tony,

Perhaps the word is getting around that you get a better price that many ebay sales achieve, take less (or comparable) commission, fix and test them first - and then do all the packing and posting (which I know from experience can be a right pain).    Take care - if those large emporiums paying seven quid a loco get to hear that you're moving in on their "action" they might just send take out a Contract on you....:jester:

Kind Regards,

Brian

I'll have to watch out!

 

What Mo and I do (I always include her because she diligently sorts out all the monies) happened really by 'accident'. It certainly wasn't a planned 'new career path'. 

 

My point about the (apparent) increase in the number of modellers dying is down to a generational thing. It's my perception that the greatest number of (surviving) modellers right now are either very close to or have passed their Biblical allocation of years. I'm definitely one of the latter. Yes, there are younger modellers, but (pre-Covid) take an age demographic at a show and the vast majority will be older men. It's no surprise now (again, pre-Covid) that few (if any) shows offer concessionary tickets for those retired. If they did, takings at the door would plummet. 

 

As others have pointed out, collections to be 'disposed' of have never been larger, and, in the main, of such a high quality. Which rather makes me wonder, what's the average age of the folk buying these models off me? 

 

To be fair, four have gone to a bloke of my children's generation and a few will go to a guy in his 50s, but the others...........? Yesterday, one to a guy in his 70s, today to another chap in his 70s and tomorrow a bloke in his late 70s (these are picked up here or to be picked up). 

 

Food for thought?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

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12 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

Guilty as charged m'lud. (Except offences numbers 6, 19 and 20).

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20 minutes ago, richard i said:

The way to ensure you get a model in exactly the condition you want it is to buy a present for yourself. I do every year. 

 

And then re-work/number/paint as required!

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1 hour ago, Tony Wright said:

I'll have to watch out!

 

What Mo and I do (I always include her because she diligently sorts out all the monies) happened really by 'accident'. It certainly wasn't a planned 'new career path'. 

 

My point about the (apparent) increase in the number of modellers dying is down to a generational thing. It's my perception that the greatest number of (surviving) modellers right now are either very close to or have passed their Biblical allocation of years. I'm definitely one of the latter. Yes, there are younger modellers, but (pre-Covid) take an age demographic at a show and the vast majority will be older men. It's no surprise now (again, pre-Covid) that few (if any) shows offer concessionary tickets for those retired. If they did, takings at the door would plummet. 

 

As others have pointed out, collections to be 'disposed' of have never been larger, and, in the main, of such a high quality. Which rather makes me wonder, what's the average age of the folk buying these models off me? 

 

To be fair, four have gone to a bloke of my children's generation and a few will go to a guy in his 50s, but the others...........? Yesterday, one to a guy in his 70s, today to another chap in his 70s and tomorrow a bloke in his late 70s (these are picked up here or to be picked up). 

 

Food for thought?

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

If you follow that through to its logical conclusion, then the ‘last man standing’ will probably be a centenarian who has acquired a very large collection indeed...

 

Perhaps an extreme view, but I think we all understand that the future of the hobby will be much more diversified than of old.  But there should still be a home for at least the better quality kit-built items.

 

 

 

Edited by Chamby
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When I started modelling, it was very much the traditional father and son type arrangement. When my Dad passed away, his model railway collection stayed with me, although it has been in a big trunk in the loft as my interests have developed and moved on.

 

Likewise, when Peter Denny passed away, his layout came to me.

 

So I am now the custodian of the collections of 3 people. When I fall off my perch, there is nobody in my family who would want to take it on, so homes will need to be found for Buckingham, my Dad's stuff and my stuff. I can't quite imagine who is going to want a "superdetailed" Hornby Dublo "Golden Fleece" with etched nameplates glued over the printed ones and with real coal added!

 

Of course re-homing Buckingham is not your typical everyday situation but I do wonder how many collections are being broken up and sold on because there is no longer the father/son handing down of interest in railways generally and modelling them in particular.

 

It is now more a case of "finding a new home for Dad's stuff" rather than the next generation taking it on.  

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13 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

8/20 I'm feeling quite depressed. Guess many are 'work in progress' and after working for ICI and DuPont then accidents (thus far), have been few (safety drilled into us). Would like to add No.21 = Weathering of a loco or rolling stock based on a prototype photograph - then 9/21 (Mick B would approve).

 

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5 minutes ago, Chamby said:

 

If you follow that through to its logical conclusion, then the ‘last man standing’ will probably be a centenarian who has acquired a very large collection indeed...

The ultimate dispersal of which will present a far greater challenge than any faced by Tony....

 

It's been notable what a high proportion of the locos being rehomed represent the BR era, in line with the prototype experience of so many of we baby boomers, who can be reasonably assumed to form a majority of the previous owners, just as a Big Four following dominated the previous generation.

 

I get the impression that younger recruits to the hobby tend to be more open to influences outside their personal experience than we have been. This may well result from railways having played a less influential part in everyday life for society as a whole in recent decades. Our hobby, in future, can be expected to become increasingly diverse in terms of prototype and era.


During my fifty-odd years in, out and back in the hobby, it has become progressively harder/less lucrative to shift pre-1948 models, and the same will happen to those of the BR era. I've long considered that the sheer modelling variety open to devotees of the late-steam/transitional period will always give it something of an edge. However, the "generational" factor is already diminishing and it's reasonable to expect a tail-off in the proportion of  modellers and/or collectors with an interest in the 1950s and 1960s to depress both demand and values for all but the very best of such models.  

 

John

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34 minutes ago, zr2498 said:

8/20 I'm feeling quite depressed.

 

1 through 5 and 17 could be easily achieved if you were so minded, and they’d bump the count up a bit.

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21 minutes ago, Dunsignalling said:

The ultimate dispersal of which will present a far greater challenge than any faced by Tony....

 

It's been notable what a high proportion of the locos being rehomed represent the BR era, in line with the prototype experience of so many of we baby boomers, who can be reasonably assumed to form a majority of the previous owners, just as a Big Four following dominated the previous generation.

 

I get the impression that younger recruits to the hobby tend to be more open to influences outside their personal experience than we have been. This may well result from railways having played a less influential part in everyday life for society as a whole in recent decades. Our hobby, in future, can be expected to become increasingly diverse in terms of prototype and era.


During my fifty-odd years in, out and back in the hobby, it has become progressively harder/less lucrative to shift pre-1948 models, and the same will happen to those of the BR era. I've long considered that the sheer modelling variety open to devotees of the late-steam/transitional period will always give it something of an edge. However, the "generational" factor is already diminishing and it's reasonable to expect a tail-off in the proportion of  modellers and/or collectors with an interest in the 1950s and 1960s to depress both demand and values for all but the very best of such models.  

 

John

Dare I say that many younger recruits (and some older), might well be modelling the late steam / transitional period but with DCC and especially much improved chip and speaker technology for sound, then conversion of older kit built models might be a barrier.

Perhaps it is time for the kit manufacturers to move (adjust) their design so that DCC / sound / lighting is an option from the start.

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14 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

I can manage all except 6 (although I have taken a loco to Tony’s house for him to fix so I think I’ll count that as a half!), 8 (too young!), 10 (Peco is good enough for me but I do bend them), 19 (but I have exhibited one I’ve part built so I’ll give myself a half again), 20 (but I’m working on it). So 15 and two halves =16 out of 20. Not too bad given I only restarted the hobby 9 years ago.

 

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1 hour ago, t-b-g said:

It is now more a case of "finding a new home for Dad's stuff" rather than the next generation taking it on.  

 

Having had a significant "scare" some months ago (fortunately I managed to body-swerve that one) I'm actively down-sizing things that I realise I'm (a) unlikely to ever need, and (b) give me no great interest to own (e.g. inherited family china).  Whilst I hope I'm a long way off a fitted box such things can appear at the most awkward moments without prior arrangement, so I've decided that, as there's no-one else likely to carry out the task then I'd much rather find (hopefully) caring new homes for such items than a complete stranger take the easy way out and skip the lot. :cry:

Besides, "Sir" keeps tempting Bear with pictures of desirable items, so space is required.... :laugh:

Edited by polybear
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32 minutes ago, zr2498 said:

Dare I say that many younger recruits (and some older), might well be modelling the late steam / transitional period but with DCC and especially much improved chip and speaker technology for sound, then conversion of older kit built models might be a barrier.

Perhaps it is time for the kit manufacturers to move (adjust) their design so that DCC / sound / lighting is an option from the start.

The beauty of kit construction is that whatever features you want can be allowed for, but that's a job for the builder rather than the kit manufacturer.

 

However, even if you do include those facilities, you can expect to need to update everything to match new standards in twenty years time; and all the interfaces familiar today may well have become obsolete in the meantime.

 

Just as the technology has moved on, it will continue to do so. DCC, as we know it, may have been displaced in new models by then, in favour of power and control systems that don't require energised track at all.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
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15 hours ago, Manxcat said:

Are you an experienced railway modeller? If you think you are then, just for a bit of fun, how many of the following can you say you have done or relate to you? 

 

1. Burnt yourself with a soldering iron.

2. Cut yourself with a bladed scalpel you were using as a modelling knife.

3. Stuck your fingers together with superglue.

4. Left a fingerprint in a plastic model because liquid solvent got onto your fingers.

5. Knocked over an open bottle of solvent which then covered more than 10% of your working surface.

6, Taken a loco to Tony Wright's loco clinic at a show for him to service or repair,

7. Been to three or more "How To" talks at a model railway show. 

8. Been to a model railway show at the Central Halls Westminster.

9. Have at least 20 railway related books which you have not read nor browsed through for over a decade.

10. Hand built a point in any gauge.

11. Modelled a building from scratch.

12. Constructed a complete loco from a kit.

13 Been given a piece of rolling stock as a birthday or Christmas present  in exactly the period, gauge and livery you wanted.

14. Built a working semaphore signal from a kit.

15. Used an electric static grass applicator.

16. Painted a model loco crew.

17. Spray painted your hand instead of your model.

18. Built a complete layout yourself.

19. Exhibited it at a model railway show.

20. Written an article published in a model railway magazine.

 

If you have done all 20 then you are clearly an experienced, and probably gifted, railway modeller. (Well IMHO anyway.)

 

Archie

 

 

I claim 15 out of 20; saying "no" to 6, 7, 10, 15, 19 & 20.

 

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1 minute ago, Northmoor said:

What if you're instinctively a very careful person who hasn't had all the "accidents" listed, but has actually built and exhibited a layout?

Then how do you learn and improve?

Having speared my foot with a garden fork and almost severed my right thumb by the age of seven I suppose I had a good start in life.

(Mis) Adventures with soldering irons and chemicals was a natural progression.:D

Bernard

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