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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

 

I never think time spent on making models is time wasted; nor time spent researching information on them, even via the internet (though I much prefer books). During the lockdowns, I found my making of models to be an absolute Godsend, even if I did demolish my stash of kits (and have had to replace them!). 

 

 

Like Tony, I have exhausted my pile of kits, but did have a Comet Brit chassis kit, donated by an RM pal, and some acceptable wheels and motor in the spares drawers. A few years ago, inspired by one of his articles, I had tried and failed to follow suit on a Hornby tender-drive model.

 

The Comet/Hornby Brit now has the main elements of the chassis and valve gear fitted. This was either my second or third go at doing this, so  I suppose I must be getting either better or luckier. Having said that, in my next life I'm going to model the GWR. You wouldn't want to see a video of me fighting with the strands on the valve gear, and certainly wouldn't  want to hear the audio. I take my hat of to folk who had build these things in 5 minutes.

 

I have photos of 70036 at York, and the modified "blinkers " are appropriate. Brits were reasonably common at York in the 60's, or else someone took a photo of every visit. However York was as far up the ECML as they got, so a visit to Newcastle/Little Benton is a bit of an anachronism. Hey ho.

IMG_20211119_150918.jpg

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5 hours ago, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Phil,

 

 'I wonder how many of us would be railway modellers now, had the Internet been around in our youth and the railway scene been as amputated as it is today.  Not many, I suspect'.  

 

I asked exactly this same question of my oldest friend, yesterday. We first met in September 1958, on starting senior school, becoming firm friends straight away. After that, we'd meet most Saturdays on an occupation bridge not far from his home in Curzon Park, Chester, and spend the day trainspotting. Either there, or cycle off down the Broughton Straight to see what might be on Mold Junction Shed. Or, if the pocket money stretched, off we'd go to Crewe (with others, of course). We were witnesses to the 'Greatest Free Show On Earth'! 

 

If it rained too much, we'd set out his Hornby Dublo three-rail track on the floor and play for hours with that. 

 

One could get just one channel on the TV (I think ITV was just coming in), in flickering black and white, and, as with the rest of out vast post-War baby-boomer generation, we generally made our own entertainment. Would we have done the same were the phones/computers of today available then? Probably not, but I'm damned glad they weren't. 

 

Computers have been called 'the thieves of time', and that's probably true. However, without one I doubt if I'd have written so many books and magazine articles. I certainly spend time on Wright writes each day, though I rarely feel that it's time wasted. I've learned such a lot from it, and, I hope, have been able to help others. 

 

I never think time spent on making models is time wasted; nor time spent researching information on them, even via the internet (though I much prefer books). During the lockdowns, I found my making of models to be an absolute Godsend, even if I did demolish my stash of kits (and have had to replace them!). 

 

As for the hours spent at shows down the years? What wonderful memories. 

 

Those without any creative hobbies, even time-consuming ones, must have suffered greatly over the last 18 months because of social isolation.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

I think there is a lot in this - the appeal of the internet, warts and all, must have had an impact on the sorts of hobbies that (particularly younger) people get involved with. 

 

But, let me give you a counter-example.

 

The internet (and this forum in particular) is what got me into railway modelling (having owned some models as a child, but not having touched them for 20 years). Lockdown plus some idle curiosity led to joining RMWeb, which then led to purchasing some RTR models, then building a small layout. I've since started building kits and making things for myself - and I'm well on the way to finishing my second Gresley coach from a resin kit and whitemetal/brass components. I wouldn't have contemplated any of this without all the wonderful things that people on this thread and others show, and the advice that they share. 

 

So things can run both ways. And undoubtedly, taking up a creative hobby has hugely helped with the isolation of the past couple of years, as Tony has mentioned. 

 

Mark

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This morning, and to my amazement, I participated in a Zoom meeting with Chris Mead (Overlord) and Graham Nicholas (Grantham and Shap), chaired by Phil Parker. There was natural amusement when I had to phone up Phil at the start to ask him which buttons to press to 'get-in'. Anyway, I managed it, with help.

 

The subject matter was principally our approaches to prototype modelling, including motivation, research and how things were actually achieved.

 

I came to the conclusions (obviously) that to model a prototype main line (in 4mm), at least 30' in length was necessary, that one must be prepared to make a lot of things, either by oneself or as part of a team and to expect it to take a lot of time (or, if one has the financial resources, get someone else to do it all for you).

 

The results will be shown during the next BRM virtual exhibition at the beginning of December. Despite my presence, it might be worth a look.

 

Oh, and I was also told that I wear the same style of specs as Chris Nevard - I'm digging out my old pair right now! 

Edited by Tony Wright
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48 minutes ago, Tony Wright said:

This morning, and to my amazement, I participated in a Zoom meeting with Chris Mead (Overlord) and Graham Nicholas (Grantham and Shap), chaired by Phil Parker. There was natural amusement when I had to phone up Phil at the start to ask him which buttons to press to 'get-in'. Anyway, I managed it, with help.

 

 

Welcome to the world of virtual meetings, which have been a big part of my life since March 2020, and are likely to continue being so!.

 

At first, I misread the first line as indicating that Chris Mead was the Overlord. 

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16 minutes ago, TrevorP1 said:

A few days ago our Headmaster gave us the opportunity to acquire various GW locos and rolling stock. Having seized the chance to have a  few more cattle vans in the broccoli special, a box of almost completed Coopercraft W5s duly arrived.

 

In the nicest possible way, they were a motley collection but as they weren't soldered together (!) I had to go with what was there. Originally the intention was to put them aside until the New Year but the warm weather of the last few days gave an opportunity to get them sprayed, so I set to. Much repair of sundry fragile parts was needed and some remains but to be honest I was glad to get them to a runnable state because, on close examination, some of the axleboxes were at fairly  jaunty angles.

 

They 'are what they are' but the famous five happily rattled round at a scale 50mph without dropping to bits, wobbling about or derailing. I ran out of couplings so a bit of swopping had to go on. The bauxite is Halfords red oxide primer which with a little weathering will look like the wagon the far right. The underframes still need painting, possibly some new buffers, then transfers and weathering.

 

In truth I probably now have too many ex-GW vehicles in the train but these have found a place and a couple can always go as empties in a westbound goods. Not only that, more funds for CRUK. Thank you Tony, a result all round! 

 

IMG_8192.jpeg.b85a17de539e7ebee40ad5efb02fc38c.jpeg

What a fantastic transformation Trevor,

 

Thanks for showing us. Sow's ear and silk purse spring to mind!

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Barry Ten said:

I was stuck in Cardiff Central for a hour or so on Sunday, waiting for a train to Pencoed. It's normally the Maesteg service, but it wasn't showing on any of the destination screens, which only ran up to a certain time. I went looking for the old, printed timetables (on hinged boards) that give all the services by destination, listed alphabetically ... and they've gone. There were none on any platforms. I was given no explanation other than, no they've gone mate. Because there was a rugby international I couldn't get down into the main concourse to see if any still remained but I still found this astonishing. Are such things now deemed too old-fashioned on our app-driven, screen-obsessed age?

 

It reminded me obliquely of a time when we were looking for trains from San Francisco down to Bakersfield. We went to the Amtrak office and the guy started listing the available services. I asked if there was a timetable and with some amusement he dug into the dustiest drawer and came out with the printed schedule. He said: "I don't need to tell you guys how to read one of these, do I. You're Europeans. No American has a clue."

 

 

 

Similar in York station, where a new Travel Centre opened during last year's lockdown.  It has copious racks for leaflets (timetables and others) but for several months (perhaps ever since it opened) they have all been empty.  I have read that printed timetables aren't being produced at the moment due to the frequent timetable revisions in response to the pandemic, which is perhaps understandable, and hope that they might be again in future when things stabilise, but somehow have my doubts ....

 

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On 17/11/2021 at 14:55, 30368 said:

 

Thanks very much Andrew, I always think that accuracy is really important but so is, as you say, capturing the essence of a locomotive's appearance. In some ways more so.

It was, at times, a bit of a devil to build but it is a very old kit!

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

Good morning Richard,

 

apologies for the late reply. I agree, accuracy is important, get that right and build everything square, then some sort of magic should occur. It would seem that the new RTR V2 is a rather flat in the magic department, there are some accuracy issues there. Beyond personal satisfaction, a bit of building will remain the best way of getting a good V2 for the foreseeable future. Well done. 

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The good news for timetable readers is that Ely (Cambs) station has got a set on the island platform, and I actually saw someone yesterday consulting one, the give away was that they were crouching down to read them, as they are hung with the tops at waist height...

 

Andy G

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On 19/11/2021 at 10:02, Tony Wright said:

Good morning Phil,

 

 'I wonder how many of us would be railway modellers now, had the Internet been around in our youth and the railway scene been as amputated as it is today.  Not many, I suspect'.  

 

I asked exactly this same question of my oldest friend, yesterday. We first met in September 1958, on starting senior school, becoming firm friends straight away. After that, we'd meet most Saturdays on an occupation bridge not far from his home in Curzon Park, Chester, and spend the day trainspotting. Either there, or cycle off down the Broughton Straight to see what might be on Mold Junction Shed. Or, if the pocket money stretched, off we'd go to Crewe (with others, of course). We were witnesses to the 'Greatest Free Show On Earth'! 

 

If it rained too much, we'd set out his Hornby Dublo three-rail track on the floor and play for hours with that. 

 

One could get just one channel on the TV (I think ITV was just coming in), in flickering black and white, and, as with the rest of out vast post-War baby-boomer generation, we generally made our own entertainment. Would we have done the same were the phones/computers of today available then? Probably not, but I'm damned glad they weren't. 

 

Computers have been called 'the thieves of time', and that's probably true. However, without one I doubt if I'd have written so many books and magazine articles. I certainly spend time on Wright writes each day, though I rarely feel that it's time wasted. I've learned such a lot from it, and, I hope, have been able to help others. 

 

I never think time spent on making models is time wasted; nor time spent researching information on them, even via the internet (though I much prefer books). During the lockdowns, I found my making of models to be an absolute Godsend, even if I did demolish my stash of kits (and have had to replace them!). 

 

As for the hours spent at shows down the years? What wonderful memories. 

 

Those without any creative hobbies, even time-consuming ones, must have suffered greatly over the last 18 months because of social isolation.

 

Regards,

 

Tony. 

 

 

My sons basically work/study, game, and not much else.

 

Not bothered by books, one does like making models but mainly Warhammer, he said to me I can get rid of their trinset board but not the models (as if I would - about half were mine).

 

Trains were more interesting in the past, even the much maligned blue TOPS period was fascinating.

 

My first strong railway memory was of (what I now know) a Warship on a mix of maroon and blue grey (again now know) Mark 1s.

 

I saw blue grey Mark 1s from pre school up to my mid or even late 20s.

 

The station I first spotted at I had seen at least 20 different Diesel loco classes, and what I know of at least 10 steam classes in steam.

 

I sadly just missed the end of the hydraulic era but did manage to see the 76s in service, managed a Deltic on ECML. But really enjoyed the heyday of the West of England expresses with 50s.

 

Now what do I see locally? A few types of DMU, the odd shed and the odd preserved loco. Even DMUs were more interesting in the past.

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16 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

A few days ago our Headmaster gave us the opportunity to acquire various GW locos and rolling stock. Having seized the chance to have a  few more cattle vans in the broccoli special, a box of almost completed Coopercraft W5s duly arrived.

 

In the nicest possible way, they were a motley collection but as they weren't soldered together (!) I had to go with what was there. Originally the intention was to put them aside until the New Year but the warm weather of the last few days gave an opportunity to get them sprayed, so I set to. Much repair of sundry fragile parts was needed and some remains but to be honest I was glad to get them to a runnable state because, on close examination, some of the axleboxes were at fairly  jaunty angles.

 

They 'are what they are' but the famous five happily rattled round at a scale 50mph without dropping to bits, wobbling about or derailing. I ran out of couplings so a bit of swopping had to go on. The bauxite is Halfords red oxide primer which with a little weathering will look like the wagon the far right. The underframes still need painting, possibly some new buffers, then transfers and weathering.

 

In truth I probably now have too many ex-GW vehicles in the train but these have found a place and a couple can always go as empties in a westbound goods. Not only that, more funds for CRUK. Thank you Tony, a result all round! 

 

IMG_8192.jpeg.b85a17de539e7ebee40ad5efb02fc38c.jpeg

 

Glad to see them in use. I think I was next in queue!

 

I am after a couple of W5 kits to bulk out my Airfix pile, or convert an Airfix to a wagon of the W5 door style. But something looks off about the far right one, or is that lens distortion.

 

I still need to order from CCT the transfers for my 1960s vans.

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3 hours ago, Headstock said:

apologies for the late reply. I agree, accuracy is important, get that right and build everything square, then some sort of magic should occur. It would seem that the new RTR V2 is a rather flat in the magic department, there are some accuracy issues there. Beyond personal satisfaction, a bit of building will remain the best way of getting a good V2 for the foreseeable future. Well done. 

 

Many thanks Andrew, really much appreciated. The V2 is very at home in Basingstoke shed yard! Must get back to building the layout!

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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29 minutes ago, MJI said:

Can I be rude about Jimmy Carr?

 

Is he stupid?

 

On millionaire and did not know about Mallard.

 

Jeremy was shocked as he knew.

 

Lost 31000 by not knowing his Gresley pacifics

 

Is he thick? Not sure - got caught tax for evasion or avoidance didn't he? Is he funny? Nope. Not even remotely.

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31 minutes ago, MJI said:

Can I be rude about Jimmy Carr?

 

Is he stupid?

 

On millionaire and did not know about Mallard.

 

Jeremy was shocked as he knew.

 

Lost 31000 by not knowing his Gresley pacifics

 

 

I didn't watch it but apparently he went for Flying Scotsman.

 

Maybe the NRM constantly hyping up Flying Scotsman is making people think wrong answers to trivia quizzes?

 

 

Jeremy Clarkson is definitely a bit of an enthusiast though. Don't forget he's done a few programmes on railways including a documentary on Brunel. They also featured Tornado on Top Gear which he had a drive of.

 

 

Jason

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3 minutes ago, Steamport Southport said:

 

 

I didn't watch it but apparently he went for Flying Scotsman.

 

Maybe the NRM constantly hyping up Flying Scotsman is making people think wrong answers to trivia quizzes?

 

 

Jeremy Clarkson is definitely a bit of an enthusiast though. Don't forget he's done a few programmes on railways including a documentary on Brunel. They also featured Tornado on Top Gear which he had a drive of.

 

 

Jason

 

I voted for Brunel

 

You could just tell Jeremy knew.

 

I also thought everyone knew Mars was CO2

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22 minutes ago, Dylan Sanderson said:

Nor did the game show writers! ‘The Mallard’ and ‘The Flying Scotsman’ aren’t steam locomotives!

 

yes, I know I’m being pedantic!

 

Pedantically, it's not evident if spoken: the 'Mallard' and the 'Flying Scotsman'. Likewise the 'The Tetrarch'...

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I completed the handrails on my N model of a Southern Ps4 pacific, and have begun repainting the loco:

 

sou5.jpg.377fef89796beacf78f173796022b4b8.jpg

 

sou6.jpg.259b3a87b5345f3c69b0cf67efd462de.jpg

 

Since I don't have Virginia Green, I've used Railmatch Malachite as a good-enough compromise, based on comparisons with other models in my collection. The Southern Railway's director, Fairfax Harrison, visited Britain in 1925 and came back with the instruction that these locos should be painted green, supposedly after being inspired by the LNER. The lettering and double yellow lining, once it's applied, is also very reminiscent of our Southern so perhaps Harrison took his inspiration from more than one railway.

 

Al

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16 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Pedantically, it's not evident if spoken: the 'Mallard' and the 'Flying Scotsman'. Likewise the 'The Tetrarch'...

 

 

Or The Freeman for people playing the Hlaf Life series

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Quick what would you do.

 

For my Cornish branch project I need roughly 16 carriages to get a representative selection

 

2 are Airfix (B Set)

2 are Mousa sides on a right mix with one more needed

2 would be Comet (late Collett B Set)

Got a Collett BTK

 

Question 1 is on the Mark 1s, what are Comet underframes like for Mark 1, how do they compare to RTR, or even my Plastruct underframe L sections?

 

Would it be worth just getting sides onto RTR?

 

Question 2 a corridor train, 2 are Comet a third would be, the last could be Comet or Hornby RTR, what would you do?

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Hi Martin,

 

I think one of the great things about our hobby is that we have the freedom do go about building out our projects as we personally think fit or enjoy.  On my BR East Anglian 1950’s layout, I put together a core of RTR carriage sets to get myself going, then built out using a range of different kits, to get to the full complement of my requirements.  I am now in the process of building some more kits to replace those RTR carriages either that I am not comfortable with, or which don’t strictly meet my requirements.  But that was just my personal way of tackling the matter and I’m sure there are many other equally valid ways of approaching it. Enjoy!
 

Nigel

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