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StuartM

An Asymetrical double outside slip MK2

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I'm so bored of the ballasting process that I thought I'd take a break and, some photos to get an idea of how it will look on camera.

I've learnt that it was a waste of time spraying the track before hand as all the paint got rubbed off during the rub down, once the glue had dried.

The ballast is made up of 50/50 sand and cement dust and the infill between tracks is white das clay with cement dust rubbed into it,

unfortunately the clay and cement although the perfect colour when wet, dries to a much lighter shade, so what with that and the sleeper grime being removed, the airbrush will have to come out again once the ballasting is complete.

 

Still the embankment is half built and the underpass is well on the way to being finished

The platforms for one end of the goods/signal works has been laid out, ready for the bricks and tarmac to be added.

slowly but surly, its coming along.

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Finally got the ground cover and ballast to a standard where I'm happy with it.

Sand and cement is fine for the ballast, but the ground cover was achieved by using Tamiya textured paint (dark soil) courtesy of a very productive visit to Kernow model railways

Now to fill in the gaps by the point switch blades and then respray the track with sleeper grime.

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Stuart that is an awsome bit of trackwork  and looking better as it gets bedded in

Nigel

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I thought filling the gaps between the switch blades was going to be a right pain, but it actually turned out to be easier than I thought.

A combination of a balsa wood block inserted between the droppers, with some blue tac to fill the gaps which was then painted with sleeper grime and the results are not to bad.

The tie bar is plastic rod and is way to big, so I might see about finding a smaller diameter.

Once all the holes are filled, then I can airbrush the track with sleeper grime, again!

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Stuart is that white rod intended to represent the tie bar (assuming the working one is underneath)? A piece of solid black microstip between the blades or possibly two on some turnouts, might do the job.

Don

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Stuart is that white rod intended to represent the tie bar (assuming the working one is underneath)? A piece of solid black microstip between the blades or possibly two on some turnouts, might do the job.

Don

Thanks Don,

it's just a length of micro rod to see what it looks like

as I said above it's way top big and I do need to source something smaller

I didn't realised there is such a thing as solid black microstip

any chance of a link

Rgds,

Stuart

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Stuart,

 

For things like stretcher bars on buffers I use a single black plastic bristle off a cheap broom or dust pan and brush. About 0.5mm diameter and pre-coloured.

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Stuart I bought some years ago I think it may be a dark brown but Slaters website doesn't mention colour. Brn's idea some good.

Don

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I did have some black microstrip that I inherited took from my Dad that was in a little yellow card packet and had a price c.20p, probably from the 80s. I don't think they have done black for quite some time.

 

The bristle idea sounds like a good source. Wandering how easily bent to shape and fixed they are for early type rod stretchers. 

Edited by richbrummitt

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This weekend I was going to airbrush the track with sleeper grime again, but didn't feel like it, thinking that I'd only have to get the airbrush out again when I've laid the top level track, It makes sense to do it all at the same time as setting up the layout, airbrush and paint is quite time consuming.

So instead I made a start on the other platform, which still needs some additional painting to complete.

Because I've made this layout up as I go along, the switches for the uncoupling magnets are now located in the middle of the west platform, but no matter, because this platform is going to be used for the S&T dept and the bank of switches will be incorporated into a hollow building, hiding them from view, but still accessible. (that's the plan anyway)

The four switches below base board level are used to switch polarity across the double slip. The number is the route across the slip and the lines show the position of the switches for that route.

You might notice a couple of white dots alongside some of the turnouts, this shows me where the uncoupling magnets are, making it easier to uncouple successfully.

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Because I had the camera out, here are some more photos

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It's not the right thing to do and speaking from personal experience it becomes incredibly frustrating but I'm sure it is the norm to make up large aspects of layout constructions as you go along. 

 

Good to see more progress. 

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It's not the right thing to do and speaking from personal experience it becomes incredibly frustrating but I'm sure it is the norm to make up large aspects of layout constructions as you go along. 

 

Good to see more progress.

I don't think there is a right or a wrong way to make a model railway.

Personally I prefer the organic approach, it works for me as it allows more creativity.

I also like the challenge of finding a solution to each new obstacle that arises.

This makes the construction process more realistic.

While your playing trains, I'm playing Isambard Kingdom Brunel :)

Edited by StuartM
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I don't think there is a right or a wrong way to make a model railway.

Personally I prefer the organic approach, it works for me as it allows more creativity.

Sorry to be dense but what is meant by "organic" in this context?

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Sorry to be dense but what is meant by "organic" in this context?

Its a posh word that means I make it up as I go along rather than working rigidly to a plan

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Its a posh word that means I make it up as I go along rather than working rigidly to a plan

Aaah! Thanks Stuart.

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The term organic is used when ideas seem to grow from the ones before. Each addtition may throw off new ideas. Stuart example is a good case of the effectiveness of this approach.

Don

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Before I could turn my attention to the top track I needed to complete the bridge, but before I could do this I needed to find away of cleaning the track as I wanted the bridge to be permanently fixed in place and not removable as this would put an ugly line across the trackwork.

5 minutes work with some brass, a mini drill and some super glue and I now have myself an under pass track cleaner.

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Not much has happened in the last week or two, so I shot a short video of the layout in action.

I still need to tweak some of the couplings and the shunter needs some attention, but its all moving in the right direction

 

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Finally finished laying the top track

It looks a lot flatter in real life

The use of a telescopic lens forces the perspective and makes the track look more undulating that it really is.

All track now sprayed and resprayed.

Now for the joy that is ballasting

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Stuart if you look along full size trackwork you can often see wiggles in the rails. Looks good to me.

Don

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Stuart if you look along full size trackwork you can often see wiggles in the rails. Looks good to me.

Don

Sometimes perfectly straight track can look toy-like and unrealistic, something that isn't happening here.

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One of the benefits of taking photos of your work as you go along is that the photos often show up flaws, in this case the undulating track.

Now I know it's there everytime I take another photo or place a train on that section of track, it will annoy me, so Yesterday was spent removing the internal supports from underneath the trackbed and replacing them with new ones using a meter long straight edge on the track to make sure that the rail is now level.

 

In the first photo you can see the Mk1 version hanging on the wall, waiting for me to finish the MK2 version so I can eventually return to working on the MK1

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Tonight I filled the embankment with expanding foam to make the whole structure ridged.

 

Then I started playing around with cardboard mock ups of buildings to try and get an idea of what will work and what won't.

On the far side of the layout between the East and West platforms there is a large space of baseboard as yet unfilled and I'm not sure what to do with it, I did think about a car park, but then I thought about an engineers yard with some sections of nguage track to give me an idea of how that might look.

 

Any suggestions welcome

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