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StuartM

An Asymetrical double outside slip MK2

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What ever structures you envisage to fill the gap do ensure you don't hide or block any public view of the complex turnouts. With the trouble you have gone to in the project as much open trackwork as possible should be arranged to show off finescale wheels to advantage. Years ago I dropped a clanger with my own layout  which I had tended to build from the operator's side. At Chatham Exhibition, with a colleague on the controller at the rear, I first viewed it in use from the front, I realized nearly 3/4 of the length track view of wheels was hidden ( by platform or cutting sides)

 

Also I recommend easy access to tiebars be maintained for a soldering iron possibly by making buildings removable plug-ins. All solder joints may be fine just now but, take it from many a layout owner, joint failure will occur - probably at an exhibition.

 

I too used the expanding foam years ago as a filler and strengthener. I obviously applied too much because the form-work was blown out of shape overnight. If any members use this I recommend little squirts at a time (and I mean little in proportion) allowing it to go off and then adding a bit more at a later session.

As far as dips and kinks in the track go, you possibly couldn't find a suitable make-up mirror which would have highlighted any misalignment?

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Well this layout is for personal use and is never going to be exhibited, so no problem there.

However I have been constructing the layout from one side, as per the first photo, but having now taken the layout outside to spray and having looked at it from the the other side (second photo) I'm thinking that perhaps I might keep it this way round and view from this side, although that will mean duplicating the point rods and uncoupling switches.

 

I'd already though about tie bars, or in this case 0.45 wire droppers soldered to the end of the switch blades, they are what I would consider to be a weak mechanical point.

 

Regards the expanding foam, I cut holes in the side of the embankment which acted both as an access point through which to squirt the foam and also as an escape for access foam as it expanded, hence the large balls of foam on the outside of the embankment in the photos which have now been cut away.

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I've finally finished the high level ballasting (photos to follow) and have now turned my attention to grassing the embankment.

I've never used static grass before, but the results appear to be stunning, however the cost of an applicator requires commitment before shelling out £100+, so to start with I've cobbled together this effort out of a £5 fly zapper from Maplins and a £3 tea strainer from the local hardware shop.

Not sure about the results yet, perhaps some trial and error and practice are required first.

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I don't know why but I thought static grass was going to be simple and easy, ie: just shake some on your layout and hey-presto, nice scenic landscape, however like most things that are worth having it turns out it's not so simple after-all, in fact it requires some practice and a lot of different types and lengths of grass plus scatter material and hedging etc all of which have to be built up level by level.

The photos below are of my test pieces, designed with the angle of an embankment.

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Following on from the above post, here are two photos of another test piece laid up against the embankment to see if it will work. The test piece is rather busy scenic wise and in practice I think a more spread out approach will work better, however looking at photos of real embankments, its amazing just how overgrown and abundant they seem to be

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Stuart,

Looks as if it has great potential. I haven't yet tried it but I thought you needed a nail, metal plate or something to generate the static charge from the fibres in the tea-strainer to the workpiece. What did you use?

John

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Stuart,

Looks as if it has great potential. I haven't yet tried it but I thought you needed a nail, metal plate or something to generate the static charge from the fibres in the tea-strainer to the workpiece. What did you use?

John

I just painted the boards with diluted pva and then clipped the crocodile clip onto the board.

 

I've started to grass the embankment now and stick a scriber into the embankment and clip the croc clip to the scriber.

I make sure to stick the scriber into a piece of board that is wet with pva.

I've also taken to wearing a rubber glove on my free hand as the home-made applicator likes to bite if I get the tea strainer and the croc clip to close together

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PVA is very definitely conductive when wet.  How do I know this?  I glued some track down with PVA which had bare dropper wires soldered to it and then spent hours trying to find the short circuit.  I was using a multimeter with a buzzer and it was sensitive enough see the conductivity of the PVA. The short circuit didn't really exist!

 

Luckily I didn't remove too much wiring before the penny dropped...

 

A simple bulb & battery combination would have saved me a lot of time.

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Following on from the above post, here are two photos of another test piece laid up against the embankment to see if it will work. The test piece is rather busy scenic wise and in practice I think a more spread out approach will work better, however looking at photos of real embankments, its amazing just how overgrown and abundant they seem to be

 

Amount of vegetation on embankments depends on the period and also the locality.   BR days things are often overgrown.  Earlier can be different.  

 

 

- Nigel

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This is my first attempt at scenic work,

I was aiming for industrial grime but seems to have ended up with summertime in the country

Still it looks quite nice and perhaps once the buildings and fine detail have been added it will look more neglected

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A couple of close up shots of the shunters huts

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Looks fine to me Stuart. Perhaps a bit to weathering to dirty it down just shade. It is surprising in Industrial areas how nature can make the most of any bits not being used.

Don

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A class 31 trundles down from the capital on the afternoon vans

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A class 47 heads west with a short rake of oil tankers

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A Hymek heads east towards the capital with the mid morning vans

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A 3 car dmu on a local service is overtaken by a class 47 on a west bound express

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The underpass/bridge, and a couple of shots showing the trackwork

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Looking very nice!

 

Reminds me very much of the South Shields layout that featured in MRJ many years ago - though you don't have a station, or buildings along the background..

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Really starting to look very good. Could do with removing that horrible coupling off the DMU :-)

 

Jerry

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I'm new(ish) to this thread and skipped quite a bit.

It's only that DMU coupling that told me what scale this is!

 

Well done Stuart.

 

 

Kev.

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Stuart,

Looking very good indeed - seems almost finished except for a bit of weathering. It is only when you get some of the ground texturing done that it starts to make sense to scale. I particularly like the detailed shots of the bridge abutment curves (post #86) - massive; they ain't going nowhere.

Excellent stuff.

John

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Stuart,

Looking very good indeed - seems almost finished except for a bit of weathering. It is only when you get some of the ground texturing done that it starts to make sense to scale. I particularly like the detailed shots of the bridge abutment curves (post #86) - massive; they ain't going nowhere.

Excellent stuff.

John

Thanks,

There's still quite a way to go, I still have all the buildings to make and the fine detail to add, so another 3months at least I would have thought.

The bridge and its brickwork took me several weeks to make and I'm not sure how well it shows up, but the wall on the right of the bridge not only curves round but also leans back into the embankment, which took about 4 attempts to get right, so its nice when someone appreciates it, thanks.

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The final two photos from this session

Both show the benefits of shooting in real sunlight, ie: the colouring and shadow.

The final photo would be not far off perfect if Dapol had used a different shade of blue for the Hymek, whereas I think Bachman have got the colour on the GUV absolutely spot on, although perhaps the Hymek would benefit from heavier weathering

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Hi Stuart,

 

This is absolutely fantastic modelling.  Really like the scenic work that you have added, it works just right with the variation in colours and textures.

 

May I ask what material you have used for the brickwork on the bridge abutments?  It looks very good indeed :good:

 

It's alway nice to see BR blue running up and down :yes:

 

Cheers

Lee

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Awesome! If I manage anything even vaguely close to what you've achieved, I'll be a very happy man indeed.

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