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German TT - Kirchheim


rekoboy
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18 hours ago, rekoboy said:

There has been some activity at Kirchheim of late - note the new platform roof in one of my following photos. more on that later. The big news is that Kirchheim has just received a new loco - the BR 58 (ex Prussian G 12) from Hornby-Arnold. The long wait has been worth it! The loco is fantastic - one of the smoothest and quietest runners that I have encountered, and the detail and paint scheme are of the highest standard. The only negative for me is the poor quality of the loco crew figures - but they can be changed easily, I think. See what you think!

Hornby BR58 1.jpg

Hornby BR58 2.jpg

 

Lovely looking model and one of my favourite locomotives

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On 15/10/2021 at 09:58, Hobby said:

If they do i hope that they'll choose the right scale and not Triang's hybrid version. There's no excuse to build to a larger scale these days unless to appease a small home market.

Hornby markets its TT, which is to European 1:120 scale, of course, through its German ? Chinese? Arnold subsidiary. So far the selection is small but of admirable quality - two steam locos, the BR 95 and the BR 58, one electric, a Reichsbahn CoCo Class E(2)51and numerous versions of the Köf shunting tractor. There are few Arnold TT dealers in the UK, but Hornby's own mail order service is great.

Edited by rekoboy
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  • 5 weeks later...

Sadly, I have been diverted yet again from work on the layout by the lure of road transport in 1:120! While tidying up I found a box with some broken toy cars from the GDR which had once belonged to my son. Anyone else would have taken the junk briskly to the bin. Not Rekoboy. Some time ago an acquaintance had passed on to me the attached photo of a French Willeme tractor unit with a swan's neck (goose neck?) low loader which I thought would be a good modelling project. I had a couple of crane jibs in my SES vehicle parts bag and a spare MK/Klose/Schirmer MAN tractor unit - and now I had plenty of moulded plastic wheels, metal axles and chassis parts from the broken toy cars, plus diverse bits left over from other projects. The perfect basis for a new heavy truck! The low loader is now nearly complete - a few more details and some weathering and rust are needed.

Schwanenhals-Basis.jpg

Schwanenhals im Bau.jpg

Schwanenhals fast fertig.jpg

willeme_prp.jpg

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You will be relieved to learn that some work has taken place on the layout - Bahnhof Kirchheim is almost complete, although a good number of figures need to be added and more detailing and signage completed. As you can see, some of the station staff are amazed that further work has been done! The platform is lit under the canopy with LEDs from a cheap strip intended for USB power. They are hooked up 'invisibly' to the power supply with fine copper wire recovered from a VW relay!  I am very pleased with the station signs which were produced with Word on my PC, employing the font 'Preussische IV 44 Ausgabe 3' which is available free on the internet if you search. See illustration. I experimented with various fonts and this clearly looked the part. The signs were printed on glossy photo paper and stuck with liquid cement on to poly sheet strips.

PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3.jpg

Bewunderung der neuen Schilder.jpg

Bewunderung der neuen Schilder 2.jpg

Edited by rekoboy
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  • 4 weeks later...
On 23/11/2021 at 13:13, rekoboy said:

You will be relieved to learn that some work has taken place on the layout - Bahnhof Kirchheim is almost complete, although a good number of figures need to be added and more detailing and signage completed. As you can see, some of the station staff are amazed that further work has been done! The platform is lit under the canopy with LEDs from a cheap strip intended for USB power. They are hooked up 'invisibly' to the power supply with fine copper wire recovered from a VW relay!  I am very pleased with the station signs which were produced with Word on my PC, employing the font 'Preussische IV 44 Ausgabe 3' which is available free on the internet if you search. See illustration. I experimented with various fonts and this clearly looked the part. The signs were printed on glossy photo paper and stuck with liquid cement on to poly sheet strips.

PreussischeIV44Ausgabe3.jpg

Bewunderung der neuen Schilder.jpg

Bewunderung der neuen Schilder 2.jpg

This is very handy, I was wondering what would be the right font to make station signs 

 

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I have managed to find time during the festivities to complete the last building (well, probably the last!!) for Konradsweiler. All the members of my family like to see themselves rendered immortal as the owner of a shop or business on my layout - you will remember from my previous articles that my friend Günther is the owner of the butcher's, my daughter a cafe proprietor, my son a bookseller, my sisters in law a bakery and a bed and breakfast establishment! This time it is the turn of our niece Elke who, with her husband, has a bike shop in Köthen/Anhalt. The building owes a little to Pola, a bit more to Auhagen and a lot to my well-stocked bits boxes. I find it difficult to throw anything away. The signs were produced on the PC, the blue enamel advertising sign for MIFA bikes came as a photo from a nostalgia website and was suitably reduced. Tomorrow I shall add the gutters and downpipes and a few more small details.

Zweirad 1.jpg

Zweirad 2.jpg

Zweirad 3.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I have now directed my efforts to getting the tram route running. I have simplified the track layout at the depot - photos will follow - and at last I have got trams that run adequately. For a long time the only powered vehicle that would run properly on the tram route was the remotored Köf which has turned out to be a fantastic test machine. Quite a while ago I bought second-hand a Gotha tram with trailer cars by the Thuringian firm of Karsei. It looks the part - but was a dreadful runner. I invested then in a couple of Kato N chassis from Plaza Japan (www.plazajapan.com) which turned out to be useless , too, because their high gearing made them unsuitable. I have still not got the little electric loco to run properly, either, although it will be worked on soon. Just as I was planning to make the tram route and depot a static feature a German acquaintance who models trams in TTm told me that Kato had re-designed the 4-wheel N chassis with a flywheel and coreless motor. I ordered two in November directly from Plaza Japan, and they were here remarkably quickly at a very decent price. What a pleasant surprise they turned out to be! The running characteristics are absolutely first-rate - and with the flywheel they will coast over dead frogs with no problem. I wish some of my mainline TT locos would run as well! The first rebuild has been the Karsei tram. To get the Japanese mechanism to fit it had to be shortened (no problem with a sharp knife or razor saw) and then altered in shape using poly sheet and profiles to match the existing chassis. The photos explain this. The second Kato chassis has gone into a tram body which I bought from Shapeways. It is a model of one of the trams which ran on the Lockwitztalbahn in the suburbs of Dresden which was abandoned in 1977. This tram survived, though, and is still in occasional use on the Kirnitzschtalbahn in Bad Schandau.

http://www.tram-und-bahnbilder.de/details.php?image_id=153&mode=search

The quality of the bodyshell is not brilliant and a lot of strengthening has been needed where the pantograph by Sommerfeld is screwed on, but the chassis fitted perfectly into the bodyshell with very little alteration apart from the removal of the end hand-rails and the coupler boxes. Painting and glazing will follow soon!

Kato 11-110.jpg

Abgesägt.jpg

Umgebautes Fahrwerk.jpg

Der Boden.jpg

Zwei Fahrwerke.jpg

Strab Fertig.jpg

Lockwitztal.jpg

Lockwitztal und TWB.jpg

Edited by rekoboy
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More exciting progress on the VEB Straßen- und Überlandbahn Kirchheim-Annaberg - on the tram route in other words! I have finally achieved success with the little B-B electric locomotive, the 'pocket crocodile'. As you might have read in earlier posts, the original Japanese body kit proved impossible to glue together, so it was junked, except for the buffer beams and the bogie sideframes. You will remember that I sourced a very nice bodyshell from Shapeways, for which I had to build a new chassis while retaining the two Japanese power bogies. So far so good. But then the almost complete loco turned out to be a very poor runner, indeed - mostly, I discovered, because the two traction motors were not synchronized. I put the electric loco aside for quite a while and pondered a good deal, before I plucked up courage, seized the soldering iron and rejigged the wiring of the loco. I was very concerned that damage could result from my activities but the use of a fine-tipped USB soldering iron (which does get pretty hot) and low-melt solder enabled me to wire the two motors in parallel and improve the power pick-up on all eight wheels. My plan worked!! The 'pocket croc' runs beautifully, the pulling power is not fantastic, although I have put little lead blocks on board, but the croc will only need to pull or push a couple of track maintenance wagons - see photo. She has been painted with Revell acrylic colours. The pantograph is one of my collection of elderly TT? N scale? ones from my friend Hartmut in Brandenburg. The loco is nearly finished - she still needs couplings, lamp jewels, hand rails, brake hoses and a crew. Now I have started on a production line for TTm wagons having discovered that the SES W50 truck body (of which I have a bag full) is a perfect fit for the Peco N gauge goods wagon chassis. You can see the prototype as the rear wagon in the photo - I have disguised its origins a bit with brake wheels and steps! Both of the goods wagons are fitted with Bachmann N scale metal wheelsets with pinpoint bearings - they are astonishingly free-running!

Westentasche-Krokodil im Bau.jpg

Westentasche-Krokodil Fahrmotoren.jpg

Westentasche-Krokodil.jpg

Westentasche-Krok mit Loren.jpg

Edited by rekoboy
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Here are some panorama pictures of the layout as it stands. Progress has been made , but there is still some way to go! But is a layout ever finished?? The 'town centre' of Konradsweiler is provisionally in place, mostly to test the lighting. When I start the installation of the overhead lines for the tram (soon??) the town centre module will just be unhooked from the power supply and lifted out. It will then have more details and road surfaces added before it returns to the layout.

Panorama 01.22 a.jpg

Panorama 01.22 b.jpg

Panorama 01.22 c.jpg

Panorama 01.22 d.jpg

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I have been following your layout build and expanding MPD with interest for some years now.

 

Your Marke "Eigenbau" BR 58 made from BTTB donors was particularly interesting, back in the dark ages this was the only way of getting alternatives to the limited and eintönig BTTB offering and DDR modellers were very creative. I was lucky to pick up a few examples very cheaply in the 1990's before the TT renaissance pushed prices up;

 

Br24.JPG.92f17aa2e4d1805cbff52ca66123eaaa.JPG

 

A very nicely done Br 24 2-6-0

 

Br50.JPG.34c4c827e616ed0b2eeaacb323e52e48.JPG


A Br 50 2-10-0 consisting of a Br 35 body and tender on a chassis made from two Br 56 joined together

 

Br65.JPG.56c45b735c8d83c2a314c93132b00538.JPG

 

A Frankenstein Br 65 2-8-4T cobbled together from all sorts of bits! (Still needs work as the front footplate isn't right for the DR version)

 

Br94.JPG.bc9853473fbee276d11f47efe3594863.JPG


And a Br 94 0-10-0T consisting of two Br 92 bodies and chassis chopped in half and spliced together.

 

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Wow, TT Pete, what an evocative set of photos! Brilliant. The average TT modeller in GDR times would probably have sold his soul - if a good, atheistic GDR citizen had one - to get his or her hands on those locos! My own BR 50 was an officially produced version on a lengthened BR 56 /86 chassis - in the GDR it was only available in limited numbers to the members of the official national model railway society DMV (Deutscher Modelleisenbahnverband der DDR). As I think I mentioned in an earlier post, the BR 50 was sold in the UK in standard BTTB packaging by, among others, Mays Models in South London.

BR50.40 V1.jpg

Edited by rekoboy
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