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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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Whilst browsing GWR.org.uk the other day I found an article on milk churns. I threw together some quick CAD with the dimensions given to make a load for a six wheeled siphon. It's bothered me for some time that the few I built are vacant. I only have access to a FDM type printer but okay for a prototype,  I thought.

 

20200222_101750.jpg.31c920258390894d16726d89b290bef7.jpg

 

Bit wobbly in places because of the type of printer and quality not set to maximum. The 'brim' around the bottom helps the print stay stuck to the build plate and is easily trimmed, even with scissors. 

 

One of my siphons has a 'loose' roof. This wasn't intentional; the glue didn't take all the way and I've never got around to fixing it fully. I carefully separated it from the body with a scalpel at the two corners that had glued. I had to trim the back of the door handles for the load to fit past. 

 

20200222_101823.jpg.dff226dc88e26b0fcc29cdbc23d3969e.jpg

 

They're really not that visible since the slats block much of the light and shape but they are much improved compared to seeing straight through and the resolution and silver  colour filament are close enough to look acceptable for how visible they are. 

 

I will try better settings just to see how different the results are. 

 

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Wouldn’t want to be the chap who had to clean out the inside of this churns, Rich!

 

Tim

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5 hours ago, CF MRC said:

Wouldn’t want to be the chap who had to clean out the inside of this churns, Rich!

 

Tim

Fortunately they're solid (or they're meant to be) Tim.

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16 hours ago, Atso said:

I've been playing around with creating 'teak' using oil paints and tinted varnish. Here is the result having been weathered down using some powders.

 

51364038_GresleyBrakeComp.jpg.b8122d8087a33662f1b9a7051acf5b50.jpg

 

Next is my 3D printed Howlden Lav Comp. I've only done this side so far and it'll need to be varnished before I can do the other side.

 

1700247871_HowldenLavComp.jpg.836bfe03615bcf302b5789743556f191.jpg

 

Very impressive Steve! That Howlden, especially, looks spot on!

 

What base colour did you start with? I've currently got some NPCS sat in a rather lurid shade of orange, which MikeTrice recommended in his thread on simulating teak. The sole bar on your Howlden suggests you used something more akin to the traditional Phoenix "teak base" tan colour?

 

J

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17 minutes ago, justin1985 said:

 

Very impressive Steve! That Howlden, especially, looks spot on!

 

What base colour did you start with? I've currently got some NPCS sat in a rather lurid shade of orange, which MikeTrice recommended in his thread on simulating teak. The sole bar on your Howlden suggests you used something more akin to the traditional Phoenix "teak base" tan colour?

 

J

Thanks Justin,

 

The Howlden's base coat is Vallejo's 'Wood' colour, while the Minitrix was left in its plastic state. I've also tried Humbrol Natural Wood and tan colours which work as well. Mike's method differs from my own in that I'm using a mix of Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, Yellow Ochre and White oils in tiny quantities on the panels to build up the 'grain' effect. The final colour hue comes from the red tinted acrylic varnish - trying to replicate how the real effect was achieved. The lovely thing about oils is that they can be blended together and have a long working time.

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4 minutes ago, Atso said:

Mike's method differs from my own in that I'm using a mix of Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, Yellow Ochre and White oils in tiny quantities on the panels to build up the 'grain' effect. The final colour hue comes from the red tinted acrylic varnish - trying to replicate how the real effect was achieved. The lovely thing about oils is that they can be blended together and have a long working time.

 

I think white might be the missing ingredient from my previous attempts! As per Mike's method, I started off trying to blend in the red parts on a Dapol Gresley (as Mike was doing on the equivalent Hornby models) and then I had been trying to effectively match the Dapol finish on other models. I'll still try to match that on the NGS Gresley full brake - but previous experiments on smaller pre-group NPCS (horse box, prize cattle vans etc.) ended up looking much too saturated and vivid when I used the same formula as the Gresley. 

 

The tone and saturation on the Howlden seems to have that slightly less vivid look that seems to suit pre-group stock a little better than the bright rich teak on preserved Gresley stock (e.g. NYMR). I'd love to see a step by step, if you get the chance when doing the other side, maybe? especially before and after the varnish.

 

When you say you're mixing and building up the effect - do you mean you're building up layers of multiple different blends of the colours (and presumably allowing to dry between)? Or are you working with all of the colours still 'wet'? 

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Posted (edited)

The Howlden is too light at the moment and needs to be darkened down somewhat. However, it is about right for the hue of an unvarnished version. GNR/LNER teak seems to be a orange/red/brown colour which I assume is down to the varnish. Mike's method creates this using an orange base coat that shows through the oil layer. My own does this using a tinted varnish and is a bit more time consuming.

 

Regarding a step by step.

 

20200303_165541-1.jpg.fd1c2a41307ff67e46f97459fd00428b.jpg

 

Here are the oils I use along with a Dapol Gresley that has been given a base coat of Tamiya 'Wooden Deck Tan'. The brush is a 2/0 Daler & Rowney sable while the oils are Windsor and Newton (which I find work best).

 

20200303_165624-1.jpg.6fa1e86642bf4a849b95ed396a1bfa29.jpg

 

Stage one is to take a little paint (in this case Burnt Umber) and put it on the model. Wipe the brush on the paper towel to remove any excess paint.

 

20200303_165659-1.jpg.89bac3982461f92fd12d946c62c06eff.jpg

 

Next brush out the paint, taking off any excess.

 

20200303_165756-1.jpg.5628d951ce7a3014bd118d4d431cd8e2.jpg

 

Then add in small amounts of the other colours and blend in using the brush.

 

20200303_165926.jpg.5a33308a4a96dce9263f4b5bfa7c8427.jpg

 

Add further colour variations if necessary.

 

20200303_165926-1.jpg.2ceee15176cbe0dce987a8c953917b37.jpg

 

Brush these out, forming patterns by changing the direction of the brush.

 

20200303_170034-1.jpg.f4de636771ddb252d01c6aef9fad63e7.jpg

Edited by Atso
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Posted (edited)

Continue working a panel at a time.

 

20200303_174142-1.jpg.8ccc62dd4b9aa1635847bec53846054c.jpg

 

I use an even mix of Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna and Yellow Ochre to go around the outside of the panels and cornices. The side needs to be left for at least 24 hours before sealing it with acrylic varnish and repeating for the other side.

 

As for the difference the varnish makes, the coach behind the Howlden in my original post has reached that stage and is awaiting lining out.

 

 

Edited by Atso
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That's a masterpiece Steve! Absolutely beautiful work!

 

I'll try the two NPCS that I've stripped down with different base coats (one orange, one deck tan) and see how I get on.

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Lovely bit of work rather reminds me of seeing my Grandfather using scumbling to create an Oak effect on a pair of French Windows. Needs a touch of the Artist to get right I suspect.

 

Don

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On my workbench at the moment, 46210's body has had the last few details added and finally made the transition from the North Somerset Light Railway livery to Works Grey (well, etching primer).

She'll be coming with me to Missenden Abbey this weekend, where I'm hoping to learn more about the dark arts of applying a proper livery. I really need to progress beyond unlined black!

 

IMG_0312.JPG.c3417152277127e7b487344e2f4e4285.JPG

 

Meanwhile, the other end of my workbench is starting to take on the air of Barry Scrapyard, with lines of incomplete locomotives awaiting the loving attention of somebody with plenty of time and optimism... The combined age of the projects on display is approaching 30 years. My goal is to complete them all before their combined age exceeds mine!

 

IMG_0311.JPG.6da52cc24ee12c4182e6a6b69ef65ab6.JPG

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On 04/03/2020 at 23:07, Nick Mitchell said:

On my workbench at the moment, 46210's body has had the last few details added and finally made the transition from the North Somerset Light Railway livery to Works Grey (well, etching primer).

She'll be coming with me to Missenden Abbey this weekend, where I'm hoping to learn more about the dark arts of applying a proper livery. I really need to progress beyond unlined black!

 

IMG_0312.JPG.c3417152277127e7b487344e2f4e4285.JPG

 

That’s great to have a proper 2mm modeller at Missenden this weekend!

 

Tim

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I might not be having much luck with locos at the moment, but I have been having fun finishing off some wagons!

 

IMG_20200307_183759__01.jpg.7a8a67bea73a64f5fba071bd33777e1e.jpg

 

The GER 10t brake van is built from a David Eveleigh etch; the GER open wagon is one of my 3D prints; GER sand wagon is a resin casting from a scratch built master that I did a while back, and the GER butter wagons are more 3D prints. The sand wagon livery is wrong, according to the Basilica Fields blog, but I like it! I did also do decals for the correct version, so I'll try and finish a second wagon in that version.

 

While I had been talking about commissioning some GER wagon decals, in the end I decided to bite the (very expensive) bullet and buy a "Ghost" white toner for my HP laser printer. The decider was the fact I also want to try doing plenty of private owner wagon liveries, for different size wagons etc, so the ability to do one off prints is really appealing!

 

IMG_20200307_183738__01.jpg.b1e1ac7020028adf075e14bef51a53ce.jpg

 

I think the white decals turned out really well! The decal film Ghost supply is really thin, and it works really well with Microsol. 

 

Here's a test print I did on black paper. I think I'll space the elements out a bit more in subsequent versions though - tricky scalpel work here!

 

IMG_20200228_162344.jpg.41c463c0103247334d297571478b1b39.jpg

 

I'm happy to supply the GER decals to other 2mm members now I've got the system sorted.

 

I've also got LOTS of the GER open wagon prints from experiments with the printer settings. Happy to supply the not quite perfect ones to anyone who wants them - otherwise they're going in the bin.

 

J

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Those wagons look excellent Justin.

 

 

How long did the GER opens last?

 

Simon

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I'll certainly be after some decals, your butter ones were excellent and I really must do a sand wagon :) 

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3 hours ago, justin1985 said:

 

I've also got LOTS of the GER open wagon prints from experiments with the printer settings. Happy to supply the not quite perfect ones to anyone who wants them

 

Do we want not quite perfect ones?

 

That's a serious question. 

 

If so would they come with transfers? 

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30 minutes ago, richbrummitt said:

 

Do we want not quite perfect ones?

 

That's a serious question. 

 

If so would they come with transfers? 

 

Sorry should have been clearer - I meant happy to give the not quite perfect ones away for free.

 

The only issue with them is visible layer banding on the ends and the floor inside - the sides are pretty well as per the photos above. Basically I'd been fiddling with print settings after starting to use a different resin, but I hadn't noticed that anti-aliasing had defaulted back to 4x rather than 8x - so I did a lot of prints at that setting without realising what was causing the banding on the ends. As with a Shapeways print, you can file the banding and/or coat generously with primer.

 

IMG_20200308_005411__01.jpg.ae0fe4ae54e3dc76dfc8858025edc46b.jpg

 

IMG_20200308_005539__01.jpg.f18c196dbe22f271b738c1293ffdeb71.jpg

 

Print with 8x Anti-aliasing on the left, and one of the test prints with slightly more visible banding on the right. Both with a light blast of Halfords primer. The trade off with the anti-aliasing is that it softens the definition of details, so in some respects the test prints are a bit sharper. 

 

Transfers I'd have to charge for. I'd be happy to do fresh prints of the wagons using the perfected settings, but I'd probably have to charge for them to cover more time and resin.

 

@richbrummitt I've still not got around to trying your GWR bogie mink again since upgrading the printer. Will try to do that this week and will let you know how it turns out.

 

3 hours ago, 65179 said:

How long did the GER opens last?

 

According to Tatlow this design was built from 1907 and still being built in 1923/4. He says numbers "fell off dramatically by nationalisation", but I don't know when the last went.

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Id like some transfers please Justin, enough to do a handful of wagons. The GE is the really useful bit, being a peasant I'm not bothered about correct numbers etc - it is 2mm after all! Im pretty sure you gave me one of the opens when I last saw you - I know I have a van but I will happily take another imperfect open or two if they are spare, they are perfect for putting a tarp over a load which can be arranged to hide any iffy bits!

 

Your GE wagons look superb.

 

Jerry

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Justin,

 

I'll happily take a not quite perfect open off you if they've not all been snapped up. They're certainly a bit different compared with run of the mill 5 and 6 planks.

 

Many thanks,

 

Simon

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Excellent work Justin! I'm really interested to see how you've gotten on with printing white decals, they look excellent.

 

Interesting to see the sand wagon. I've done one too, made up from a much butchered farish item.

 

 

20200214_174939 (2).jpg

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