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Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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Thanks chaps,

this is the prototype Andy - I didn't want to give Julia anything too easy!! You can see why I'm so pleased.

 

post-1074-0-80160800-1358380494_thumb.jpg

 

post-1074-0-28355200-1358380531_thumb.jpg

 

Jerry

 

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Something a bit "left field" has been on my workbench - some etched kits for German metre gauge stock from Roy Bergauer.

 

First an Offener Güterwagen Ow 10.839p, etched body on a lightly modified Marklin Z gauge wagon chassis.

post-7249-0-31023700-1358447945_thumb.jpg

The etched design is clever but somewhat ambitious as the internal detail (comprising floor, sides & ends) is assembled as one box and the external detail is designed to be a fractionally larger box. Unfortunately, the tolerances are such that this doesn't quite happen, so I cut the external sides & ends up and applied them seperately, filling any gaps at the corners with 5 amp fusewire filed square when in situ. Thankfully, the etch is in nickel-silver so soldering was easier. Brass would have been tricky due to its higher heat conductivity.

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Next an Offener Güterwagen "Bettgestellwagen" (bedstead wagon) Same type of design as before but a more complex build due to the steps & brakeman's seat. I would not like to travel on one of these in the depths of winter! This one sits on a shortened Marklin chassis. I used solder for the details and solder paint when laminating the sides & ends.

post-7249-0-17916500-1358448573_thumb.jpg

This is a Fakultativwagen which I think translates as "facility wagon". These were convertible for passenger and freight use, hopefully only occasionally for the former. This was an easier build as there is no internal detail to worry about. The etch comes with a basic chassis which is designed to allow the axle pinpoints to run in etched dimples. I replaced this with 2mm Association top-hat bearings and the chassis rolls nicely.

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Above is a steam tram G.M.W.E. No.5 (Gera-Meuselwitz-Wuitzer Eisenbahn). Again a slightly tricky assembly which is designed to wrap around a floor & roof. The sides * ends did not quite meet, so again the fusewire technique was called into action. The body hides the Marklin mech quite well, with a cosmetic boiler covering a lot and motor hidden behind side panels, leaving a reasonably clear cab. This is still to be finished as some of the inside needs painting before the roof is fixed on. The horizontal plates are not steps, they are lamp brackets for some quite sizeable oil lamps.

 

It's been interesting to see a slightly different approach to kit design The kits are not as sophisticated as some 2mm scale etching but the end results are quite effective.

 

Apologies for the heavy Marklin Z gauge track, I didn't have any proper narrow gauge track handy.

 

Mark.

Edited by 2mmMark
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I do like these Mark, the steam tram is particularly attractive. Presumably it will have skirts which cover the Marklin wheels.

 

Jerry

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No, in this instance, there are no skirts in the kit(which presumably makes it a steam trollope rather than a steam tram). The wikipedia entry for this loco shows a different outline

http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:GMWE_Nr5.jpg&filetimestamp=20061122204320

and I think the loco was later rebuilt and used in Alsace on the Erstein-Oberehnheim-Ottrotter railway.

 

I seem to be acquiring a somewhat eclectic range of narrow gauge models. Perhaps I'll need to build a 2mm narrow gauge equivalent of the Madder Valley in order to accomodate them.

 

Mark

Edited by 2mmMark
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Seven wagon under frames for Great Western wagons, all different, all from the same etch...

 

post-8031-0-26791000-1358521430_thumb.jpg

 

I think I've covered all the main variants that you could make with minimal hacking and extra pieces. The plan is to write up for the magazine, but the project has been neglected since last March!

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No, in this instance, there are no skirts in the kit(which presumably makes it a steam trollope rather than a steam tram). 

Mark

 

Mark, I'm disappointed that you are not making working Heusinger or outside Stephensons valve gear for this engine!

 

Tim

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For a while now I have been promising myself I would have a go at getting something converted to 2FS for use when out and about at exhibitions, so after an order to shop 3 for some drop in wheelsets, here it is:


post-1467-0-27837300-1358608452.jpg

 

This has also been a test bed for weathering and using several methods from various sources including in this thread (thanks Stuart), whilst not exactly Mercig standard, i'm quite pleased with how this has turned out. Hopefully I can finish the other coach before Southampton!

 

Sorry about the quality of the photo, it was a quick one grabbed on the iphone whilst the model was posed on the 'plank of many uses'

 

Tom.

Edited by TomE
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Seven wagon under frames for Great Western wagons, all different, all from the same etch...

 

I think I've covered all the main variants that you could make with minimal hacking and extra pieces. The plan is to write up for the magazine, but the project has been neglected since last March!

 

Looking again I realised there is a mistake in here and I need an eighth.  :blush:

Edited by richbrummitt

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Are those made from your own etches, Richard?

 

Any article that explains the various forms of DC brakegear would be good - it's a minefield to us non-GW types!

 

Andy

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Are those made from your own etches, Richard?

 

Any article that explains the various forms of DC brakegear would be good - it's a minefield to us non-GW types!

 

Andy

 

Looks like the Association etch to me. The one that is top right looks interesting.

 

Chris

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.

Looks like the Association etch to me. The one that is top right looks interesting.

They are all from your etch Chris: shop item 2-361. The one top right is DC1 as modified (cheaply) around 1930 to comply with RCH requirements by the fitting of a separate short brake cross shaft and lever brake on the previously unbraked side.

Any article that explains the various forms of DC brakegear would be good - it's a minefield to us non-GW types!

The instructions are actually pretty good but a a few photographs would help immeasurably to show exactly where the pieces should go along with a list of the which types would be suited to the bodies and body kits available taking timeframe into consideration.
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Thanks Steve!

 

Now finished the decking and added the smaller platforms on each post. There is alot squeezed into a small space on this signal! Just the finials to make up now and it's finished.


post-1467-0-33756300-1358796806.jpg

 

Tom.

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Not sure if this still qualifies for this thread but since it is still actually ON my workbench, here's the St Ruth departure starter again - finials, paint, servos, lights and all.

 

Not as neat as Tom's though

 

I've spent the whole of this evening reassembling it after painting and sorting out various bits of stickiness that had crept in. After finally congratulating myself for having it fully working the lights dimmed and went out :angry: :angry:. That flippin 0.4mm PCB again.

 

In desparation I unsoldered the ladder from the platform and retested the lights - they came back on again. After cleaning up the joint and resoldering it all seems fine... anyway I took a photo of the lights just in case they never work again :O

 

Actually there is still a bit of retouching a few bits of paintwork that got damaged during assembly so it's not quite 'finished'... but I think I am.

 

post-9623-0-81914500-1358808612_thumb.jpgpost-9623-0-42939600-1358808801_thumb.jpgpost-9623-0-69203000-1358808671_thumb.jpg

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Hi Andy.

 

That signal looks excellent to me! Top work, although I think you had it easier when it comes to finials :P

 

Apologies if you've mentioned already, but how are you controlling yours?

 

Tom.

Edited by TomE
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Are those made from your own etches, Richard?

 

Any article that explains the various forms of DC brakegear would be good - it's a minefield to us non-GW types!

 

Andy

 

Try the PDF attached to post 32 of this thread:

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/65307-dc-2-brakegear-as-fitted-to-4w-wagons/page-2

 

Go down to page 32 onwards to see the drawings.

 

I presume everyone expects a 48 page instruction book for a wagon underframe etch!

 

Chris

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Not sure if this still qualifies for this thread but since it is still actually ON my workbench, here's the St Ruth departure starter again - finials, paint, servos, lights and all.

 

More than qualifies that looks excellent ,  you boys and girls are making me think its time to set up Knitting :scared:

 

Still only lost one hand rail knob to the carpet monster last night out of the eight I fitted

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A little more progress on my GWR 1854 class Saddle Tank.

 

The front of the saddle has now been araldited into position, and shaped to the profile of the previously ground, filed and sanded saddle.

New firebox sides have been added.

The footplate valances have been filed back slightly to make them square to the footplate (they were somewhat rounded anyway), and to slightly reduce the width of the footplate as it's a little too wide - but I can in all honesty live with that!

The front buffer beam has been removed and the footplate filed back so that the length will be correct for an 1854.

I then filed back the front and rear of the footplate valances to "let in" some 0.0010" sheet to give the characteristic shaping to the footplate valances.

 

Finally, I have been putting my recently acquired lathe to work turning up some new buffers and associated housings in the "tapered then parallel" Dean style. These were fabricated onto a new buffer beam which in turn was araldited in place.

 

The images below show how she's looking now.

 

6

7

8

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Try the PDF attached to post 32 of this thread:

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/65307-dc-2-brakegear-as-fitted-to-4w-wagons/page-2

 

Go down to page 32 onwards to see the drawings.

 

I presume everyone expects a 48 page instruction book for a wagon underframe etch!

 

Chris

Thanks Chris,

 

The two pages showing the DC brakegear variants are very useful.

 

I think 48 pages is a bit extreme for a wagon underframe - the usual 2mm instructions with an exploded diagram are more than adequate.

 

Andy

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Thanks Steve!

 

Now finished the decking and added the smaller platforms on each post. There is alot squeezed into a small space on this signal! Just the finials to make up now and it's finished.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gifsig8.jpg

 

Tom.

 

 

Stunning work Tom! Looking forward to seeing it in place on the layout. I may have missed this earlier on in the thread, but will the signal be operated electrically?

Best regards,

Jeremy

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That signal looks excellent to me! Top work, although I think you had it easier when it comes to finials https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_blum3.gif

 

Apologies if you've mentioned already, but how are you controlling yours?

 

Yes, I don't envy you when it comes to making finials. Mine are turned up from Plastruct 1.5mm rod in the mini drill. I've also made some spares because they do get knocked off now and again.

 

Controls are based on the same servos that everyone else seems to use but are still 'under development' and we've used several variations already. I've included a couple of 'on off' photos showing the arrangement under the latest signal.

 

Servo glitches are not unheard of so I think that we need some mechanical protection between the servo and the delicate bits of the signal. The first approach was very simple - an omega loop plus a pin to fit into the servo arm but this didn't allow the use of much servo travel and the omega loop needed regular adjustment (especially after a servo glitch) and was a pig to get at. This version uses a sprung lever to reduce the servo movement and a pivoted spring clip to grip the signal wire. This is much easier to adjust but the grip on the wire isn't as strong as I would like so it does sometimes slip when I don't want it to. Having a plain wire below the board also has the advantage of allowing the bracket assembly to be removed from the post because the wires can be withdrawn from inside the post.

 

It's not perfect. The whole thing is still on the borderline between working and not working - small amounts of bend or twist in the wire can tip it over into not working. Hopefully once things are installed on the layout and working then they will stay that way.

 

The whole thing is hooked up to a MERG board and some switches on my workbench but John intends to build our own controller for the layout because the way that the MERG board uses switches is not a good match for our control panel. He's also intending to allow direct adjustment of the servo travel without needing to plug in a laptop.

 

Finally... a couple of questions for you... how do you do your painting? - what paint do you use and do you take the signal to bits for painting or leave it all in one piece?

 

post-9623-0-85112200-1358860717_thumb.jpgpost-9623-0-25844400-1358860780_thumb.jpg

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Try the PDF attached to post 32 of this thread:

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/65307-dc-2-brakegear-as-fitted-to-4w-wagons/page-2

 

Go down to page 32 onwards to see the drawings.

 

I presume everyone expects a 48 page instruction book for a wagon underframe etch!

 

Chris

 

I have seen this already. I think it a very useful document to anyone who doesn't want to buy the GWR wagon bible, which is horribly out of print, for details of underframes. 

 

What I haven't found yet is a picture of the DC2 brake with the linkage behind the solebar rather than the middle of the wagon (although it is virtually invisible unless you can see where it fits to either of the cross shafts) or the single sided brakes with the very short cross shaft and single vertical support like with DC1 as shown. I don't doubt the author since he appears to have spent 5 years focussing on this and must have checked a lot more photographs than I but I suspect that anything that was not vacuum braked was DC1 until DC3 appeared just several years later so they were incredibly rare even before they were altered/upgraded/scrapped.

 

Thanks Chris,

 

The two pages showing the DC brakegear variants are very useful.

 

I think 48 pages is a bit extreme for a wagon underframe - the usual 2mm instructions with an exploded diagram are more than adequate.

 

Andy

 

My idea was to focus on what you might build from the parts the association can provide and pictures of how the parts go. I'm not finding it easy to keep focus on parts and not sidetrack into prototype history.

Edited by richbrummitt
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