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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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Wonderful work John! I do love the look that an etched model of a Gresley teak coach has. Steel panelled stock always looks wrong to me until painted - I guess it is the plain sides that does it. What livery will these little gems end up in?

 

Thanks Steve.

 

Livery will be either crimson or maroon.   The layout they are being built for has a time period that can't be earlier than 1956 due to the inclusion of one particular, very prominent, building.   The Diag 299 picture I mentioned is, almost certainly, unlined maroon.   I know some teak stock survived long enough to receive an overhaul and repaint in the late 50s and the steel stock also.   I will be studying Hugh Longworth's book on pre-nationalisation stock and deciding which livery on the basis of withdrawal dates and, thus, the likelihood of late 50s overhaul and trawling every source I can think of for photographic evidence.

 

John

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Hi John,

 

The coaches look great! Are the hinges included with the sides or do you gave to make your own?

 

Thanks

Simon

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Hi John,

 

The coaches look great! Are the hinges included with the sides or do you gave to make your own?

 

Thanks

Simon

 

Hi Simon

 

Thanks for the kind words - each one turns out better than the last, as I would hope!

 

In answer to your question, unfortunately the hinges are not included, either as etch detail or as separate fittings (as I believe is the case with some 4mm offerings) and it's a case of finding a way to do it that suits my skills.   A couple of years ago there was a two part article in Model Railway Journal on 2mm coach building by John Aldrick that taught me most of what I know.    I can't, off hand, remember which issues as I tend to remove pieces that interest me to file in a box file before losing the rest of the mag, before I'm accused of cluttering the place up even more, but I'm sure someone on here can come to my aid.   Needless to say, those articles haven't yet made it to the box file!   John describes his method a using thin strips of etch waste, of which we all have plenty, soldering it to the etch door shut lines and trimming to length.    This, I felt, was beyond my soldering skills - as soon as I tried to clean it up it would fall off!   I much prefer some way of locating things in a hole or slot, it gives me more chance of things being in line and staying put.

 

Luckily, the etch designer has included a number of small, useful, parts as infill in parts of the etch that would otherwise be empty space and one of these is a number of representations of the jumper cables on the coach ends.    These are also half etched on the end overlays and I'm not going to file away detail just to replace it with the same thing, but with my dodgy soldering.   So, I reasoned that using these cut in half, drilling a 0.35mm hole in the right place and soldering from the back of the side I would have a reasonable chance of achieving the goal, in line and staying put when I clean it up!   This is OK if I'm only going to fit hinges to flush sided stock, i.e. Gresley steel panelled and Thompson, and not bother on teak stock where possibly only the bottom hinge is noticeable as there are a total of 16 of these jumpers on most etches which, by using the ones from the teak stock to supplement, is sufficient - an 8 compartment full third would need 48 halves, 24 each side.   If I decide to do panelled stock as well there will not be enough and something else will be needed.   There are also 72 door handles on the etch and I am assessing the possibility of using these.

 

Sorry for the meandering reply, but, hopefully it's of use.   Next time I see my bench (i.e. tidied it up a bit!) I'll try and get a couple of pictures of what I mean.

 

Regards

 

John

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It's a six coupled loco of some description. Probably a tank, judging by the guard irons for and aft. :-)

 

Jim

Edited by Caley Jim

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Coach Building in 2mm FS, John Aldrick. MRJ Issue 249, 2016. 

 

I think this is the article that you need, a very useful and informative article well worth searching out.

Edited by jollysmart

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Well Justin’s trials, and developments at work, have convinced me to acquire a 3D printer as well. Something I have always stood back from them as producing a ‘blurry photo’ rather than a crisp model. However I am truly impressed with the Anycubic Photon and I feel sure that growing numbers of people will acquire similar technologies in the next year or so.

As a first project I have made a L&Y ‘pitch’ wagon, here is a picture of the first one, painted. Chassis to come next, not printed but etched, although I may look at the axle boxes too.

The 3D model was produced using Sketchup.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif071CB63D-12CE-40C1-8002-D45F37F5ACFB.jpeg

Wow, that is stunning! The Anycubic Photon is the first 3D printer that has looked worth investing in. The wagon looks like what I would like to make in 3.5mm. I figure I could print the bodies and cast the chassis components in whitemetal off a 3D printed master.

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G6

Well, I would expect you to recognise your own etch. The wheels for this G6, and an O2, finally turned up just before Christmas, so I just had to start up yet another UFO.  The O2 is still awaiting the N Brass body etch to appear.

 

Two Terriers is enough for me.

Edited by Ian Morgan

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Impressive work on the lining too!

 

Tom.  

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Here are some pics of a chassis for the GEM L & Y saddle tank. It went together ok, just a couple of tweaks to the artwork needed. The motor is a Nigel Lawton 12V 10mm diameter midi, and it runs a bit fast, but I hope that a decoder can tame it.

 

[...]

 

attachicon.gifL & Y saddle tank #3.jpg

 

It didn't take too long to build the chassis.

 

Nig H

 

Is the GEM L&Y Saddle Tank body still available?

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Is the GEM L&Y Saddle Tank body still available?

Hi,

 

Yes, I have some in stock. I can send you the instructions if you want to see what is involved.

 

Nig H

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Hi,

 

Yes, I have some in stock. I can send you the instructions if you want to see what is involved.

 

Nig H

 

Thanks, Nigel. I thought the body has to be purchased separately, from another source. I will send you a private message with my email address so you can send me the instructions.

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Thanks, Nigel. I thought the body has to be purchased separately, from another source. I will send you a private message with my email address so you can send me the instructions.

Sorry,

 

I meant the chassis, not the body.

 

Nig H

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Just rolling off my workbench and onto the track at Modbury are 3 more wagons in readiness for this weekends Chiltern Model Railway Exhibition at Stevenage.

 

post-12089-0-73030400-1546891675_thumb.jpg

 

post-12089-0-49043600-1546891687_thumb.jpg

 

The 3 new additions are an outside framed brake van and two 3 plank wagons.  The brake van has been built up from one of David Eveleigh's etches by John Russell, and kindly provided to bolster my own meagre selection of rolling stock.  John assembled the main elements of the van but left me to add handrails, brake standard, and generally finish the model.  

 

One thing that struck me immediately was that the roof was slightly too short and slightly too narrow.  Additionally, the stove pipe is in completely the wrong position being centrally positioned on the roof rather than central to just the enclosed part of the van.  To rectify these issues (rather than make a new roof), I elected to remove the stove pipe that John had soldered in place, and file off the raised surround. The resulting hole was backed with a scrap of etch and the hole filled with solder, and sanded to make good.  A new stove pipe hole was drilled in the correct place, and the stove pipe reinstated (a washer of 5 thou plasticard was added around the stove pipe prior to priming).  To resolve the issue of the roof being too narrow, I soldered some straight 0.010" nickel silver wire along each edge of the roof, and decided that I would live with the roof having next to no overhang at the ends - because John had rolled the roof I thought it would be too difficult to extend the roof by the same ruse.

The handrails are more 0.010" nickel silver wire, bent into very wide staple shape that sits in holes in the framing at each end - I fitted a continuous handrail the length of the body as it isn't that noticeable that there are no breaks at the door (although now that I've told you I can imagine you all looking again at the photos above)  :sungum:

A brake standard was turned up on the lathe, and the top sawn across with a (very) fine piercing saw blade to accept a handle bent up from more 0.010" wire (which was soldered in place).  A bench was added across the end of the verandah in plasticard, with a hole drilled for the standard.

 

The model has been finished in 1904 livery and branded "Laira".

 

The two 3 plank wagons started life as Association GWR diagram O3 5 plank wagons.  The diagonal strapping on the sides being scraped away, as indeed was the raised part of the L angle on each side of the door (what was left of the L angle was also narrowed).  The top 2 planks were cut off / filed away and the strip of floor on the inside of the sides was also removed so that the resulting wagon would be the same width as the O5 4 plank wagon (the O3 being a wider wagon).

 

One of the 3 plank wagons has been modelled with rounded ends for variety.  Because the donor is a wider wagon, it was necessary to narrow the ends slightly (by the amount of the floor strip removed from the sides).  The amount removed being the chamfer on each side where the corner strapping is.  The chamfer then needs to be reinstated so that the sides and ends can be joined properly around the floor.  What this means of course is that the corner plate on the ends is slightly too narrow (compared with that seen on the sides), I ignored this - you've gone back to those photos again to check again haven't you?  :sungum:

Both wagons have been finished in the pre 1904 red livery, lettering on all three wagons has been done with Fox transfers (with the exception of the "Laira" branding which are old Woodhead transfers).

 

So there we are, as ready as I'm going to be for this weekends Stevenage exhibition.

 

Ian 

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I've just finished another of my CR 7T mineral 'bogie' kits and am about to give it a spray with CIF and a scrub to clean it up.  It will then get its wheels put back in temporarily and join a spindle buffered Dia 22 mineral in the queue for the paint shop.

Jim

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I have been playing around with this over the last month, as a change from sticking versaline chairplates onto sleepers.....        Quite a few 4mm modellers have improved the Hornby version in recent times with etched and resin parts to help out, and with fond memories of playing with my original Triang version as a child I decided to try my hand at a 2mm version to make up an enginners train with a bogie flat loaded with signal posts I have. It took a fair while to gather the info together with what drawings could be sourced, so it's been in the works for a while, about 18months, although actual constuction started in late December.

 

This is the 'kit of parts' that now exists. It's all hit the buffers (!) until the weather warms and I can get out to the shed and apply some primer. Then the bits can be assembled, and hopefully it will all work out. The idea is that the jib can be raised/lowered along with the hook just to be able to say it does, but it won't normally be used...!!!  Just a bit of fun challenge really.

 

post-12706-0-75319700-1547126297.jpg

 

post-12706-0-33842600-1547126305_thumb.jpg

 

post-12706-0-79133900-1547126311.jpg

 

The runner is a BR lowfit using a 4-shoe fitted chassis. Like the crane the body is just bits of brass shim & plasticard.

 

Izzy

 

 

*** So sorry. Should have said this is meant to represent a Cowans Sheldon 6.5T hand crane. They were produced between 1941-1944 in 6.5T & 10T versions.

Edited by Izzy
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This is my first ever tandem turnout. I am very pleased with the result; apart from a couple of obtuse crossing angles which are not very sharp, I wouldn't change anything - if you think otherwise, please do tell. A wagon runs perfectly under its own weight on all three ways.

 

gallery_11426_1974_1258650.jpg

 

gallery_11426_1974_1615770.jpg

 

The next step is to gap the timbers.

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Lovely work, Valentin. Only complaint is that it's not on interlaced timbers! :-)

 

Jim

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Thanks, Jim.

 

And here it is finished; with such gaps, I'd say no one can argue about electrical insulation...

 

gallery_11426_1974_348646.jpg

Edited by Valentin
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Hi Valentin

 

Excellent work. 

 

I have only built a few standard turnouts myself, so can only guess at how much more complicated a 3-way one is. 

 

I do have a query for you - how did you strip the copper to give your gapping on the sleepers.  I have used a file on edge to give a narrow gap, but it has given me grief on a number of occasions with shorts

Malcolm

 

.   

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Hi Malcolm,

 

Thank you for your kind words. A 3-way, tandem turnout is not much more complicated than a standard, 2-way turnout. Like you, during my "2mm" modelling activities I have built probably just over a dozen turnouts.

 

To strip the copper I used a chisel blade fitted in a modeller knife and a soldering iron (temperature controlled, set at 300° C). I did experiment on some scrap PCB timbers.

 

gallery_11426_1974_111479.jpg

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