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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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1 hour ago, Ian Morgan said:

Still busy doing electrics and electronics for club and friends layouts, but I try to spend one evening per week on things for 'Freshwater'. I saw a nice photo of an engineering train on the Isle of Wight in an rmweb thread about Wight Freight, but the photos disappeared before I saved copies. The picture showed lengths of rail on a train of short wheelbase single bolster wagons.

 

I picked up some old S/H brass etches of unknown origin at a meeting a while back, so I thought I might reproduce this for 'Freshwater'. The etches perpetuated the old Tri-Ang trait of brake shoes in line with the W irons, so these were removed and parts of an old Association brass etch of brake gear was pressed into service. The wagon wheelbase is shorter than any of the brake gear on the etch, so it needed some modification. Association etched nickel silver axleboxes and springs, and cast buffers were added. Some square brass tube will form the bolsters, and small T-section brass, filed down to even smaller, added to the body ends to replace the rather poor stanchions on the etch.

 

Because of the required modifications, and lack of locating aids in the etch, each one is taking 4 or 5 evenings to complete to this stage, so it is a long, slow process. Still, 3 down and 3 to go...

 

 

 

Ian,

 

They look very much like the shot-down Jidenco etches that BH Enterprises were selling (and indeed still have a few of some types). I think the wagons you have are the GWR single bolsters/match wagons.

 

The Isle of Wight Steam Railway saved a number of the ex-LBSCR single bolster wagons that were used on the island and have restored some of them;

 

http://www.ws.rhrp.org.uk/ws/WagonInfo.asp?Ref=7969

 

Andy

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4 hours ago, Ian Morgan said:

Still busy doing electrics and electronics for club and friends layouts, but I try to spend one evening per week on things for 'Freshwater'. I saw a nice photo of an engineering train on the Isle of Wight in an rmweb thread about Wight Freight, but the photos disappeared before I saved copies. The picture showed lengths of rail on a train of short wheelbase single bolster wagons.

 

I picked up some old S/H brass etches of unknown origin at a meeting a while back, so I thought I might reproduce this for 'Freshwater'. The etches perpetuated the old Tri-Ang trait of brake shoes in line with the W irons, so these were removed and parts of an old Association brass etch of brake gear was pressed into service. The wagon wheelbase is shorter than any of the brake gear on the etch, so it needed some modification. Association etched nickel silver axleboxes and springs, and cast buffers were added. Some square brass tube will form the bolsters, and small T-section brass, filed down to even smaller, added to the body ends to replace the rather poor stanchions on the etch.

 

Because of the required modifications, and lack of locating aids in the etch, each one is taking 4 or 5 evenings to complete to this stage, so it is a long, slow process. Still, 3 down and 3 to go...

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_04/3bolsters.jpg.8e547169787da0880ace67f0376265cb.jpg

 

 

Ian,

 

Following on from Andy's comments I'm attaching some photos that I took on a visit to the Island five years ago when they were in the newly erected stock shed.

047.JPG.5e8330c55c9a0fc7c406caaefd05708e.JPG

 

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050.JPG.e4f1b3092b79ff1556d06f03ba2831a7.JPG

 

051.JPG.1525e493f70ee901a3451edc8ccde354.JPG

 

052.JPG.36d7cb0e1c8578ed81a43da65e21179b.JPG

 

056.JPG.093663e4e30d34a91aec4cc08f6471ee.JPG

 

053.JPG.db94efdc97894bfd4a461f671468a3db.JPG

 

Never miss an opportunity to take photos of wagons!

 

David

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Made a start on the roof last night. As the building is low relief, I have compressed the depth of the building to bring the ridge into the build. I think I can get another layer of card on those chimneys though, toward the rear.

A0DAE678-13DA-489A-AAF9-4DE2EF6699D8.jpeg

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A Clacton Electric AM9/class 309 25Kv EMU undergoing initial painting. Only taken 5 years to get to this stage.........but it does now run!    Whooosh........

 

1394273707_RMweb03.jpg.f8b78f0a96117599dd7ff50962cfe51f.jpg

 

Izzy

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gosh that looks like a Farish  power unit  :o  what bogie side frames are you using ?

 

I know use them myself in similar applications 

 

lovely roove details

 

Nick

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, nick_bastable said:

gosh that looks like a Farish  power unit  https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_ohmy.png  what bogie side frames are you using ?

I know use them myself in similar applications 

Nick

 

You’re not wrong, it’s out of one of those Farish 101 parcels dmu’s that had two motor units. One was used in a Cravens 105 build and the other here. 

 

This 309 EMU uses Farish 7mm coach wheels in commonwealth bogies. They came from Farish Pullman coaches* along with the roofs. I grafted one set of frames onto the power bogie outer clip frame. 

 

* should add I also used the underframes and corridor connections, basically just throwing the actual bodies away. Seeing what the current prices are now I think perhaps today I would try another less expensive route......at the time (2014) they were obtained from Hattons @£12 each......

 

Izzy

Edited by Izzy
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3 hours ago, Atso said:

Following some advice from Paul Cheffus and Chris Higgs about how to fit smaller, non-Farish, N gauge wheels to the Association's conversion axles, I made a start on the LNER/GER Mac K wagon etches yesterday. However, I got a bit carried away and finished it!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_04/734140319_2mmAssociationEx-GEMACK.jpg.578ff437c9953e80c8a6ef9e8c0904c3.jpg

 

It now takes its place among my growing collection of wagons awaiting painting.

 

Can we have a photo of the underside showing the wheels?

 

Chris

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3 hours ago, Chris Higgs said:

 

Can we have a photo of the underside showing the wheels?

 

Chris

 

No problem Chris

 

20190418_183946.jpg.ff3e6cca12b4f598b781994c8834c4f5.jpg

 

While the wheels look to be a very tight fit, the wagon rolls freely and has passed a test using a multimeter. However, I think that I'll be getting some slightly smaller wheels in the future, just to be on the safe side.

 

I also spent a little time on the ex-GCR bogie fish van today. I purchased some etched bogie stretchers a few weeks ago and modified these so that the overlays (cut from the original bogies) could be used. I then soldered together some of the axle box etches and added these to the bogies. As I've not fitted any retaining nuts (I'm out of stock), the roof is only placed on top of the body at the moment. I'll add the buffers once I've finished adding all the overlays to the body. I also need to fabricate some truss bars in the future.

 

20190418_184058.jpg.262446d811e4cea455ad4544135773bf.jpg

 

  

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Posted (edited)

Inspired by David Searle's article in the 2mm Magazine a few months back, but lacking a milling machine, I've 3D printed a little jig to use with the new single piece etched chair plates.

 

It took a little adjustment (grooves 1.1mm wide rather than 1mm) but it works really nicely. I think one of the articles suggested grinding down a small screwdriver into a flat triangle shape as a pusher, but I found a simple push pin, with a few strokes of a file to blunt it and flatten off the sides, did the job really well.

 

What took ages and was a right pain before is the work of moments!

 

IMG_20190419_231742.jpg.0215d033dddfeba98a4805ec109c133d.jpg

 

Justin

 

EDIT - just to say I'm very happy to share the STL file with anyone else who wants to make one!

Edited by justin1985
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I've just finished the ex-GCR Mac N etched kit. While it was certainly a challenge, it was an enjoyable one. I stole the buffers from a spare Farish loco body as they were pretty close to those shown in the drawings.

 

114800348_Ex-GCRMacN.jpg.dc407780cdf2cbbedded81a9ca3430b6.jpg

 

No wheels have been fitted yet as I need to get some more N gauge 5.1mm wheelsets.

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Mass Halfords grey primer spray session. Catching up with all the stock that was in the painting queue. The first recent day on this (North East Essex) coast when a bitting wind didn't keep the undercurrent temperature down.  Living quite near the seafront we are always amused by weather references to 'a slight onshore breeze keeping things cooler'.........

 

So, half a dozen BR fitted van chassis, the Cowans Sheldon crane + lowfit runner, Cravens 105 DMU bodies, and the 309 EMU bodies. Give them a day or so to harden off, then decide what colours to apply......

1258815150_RMweb04.jpg.fc485ee40b73056e8178ddb49ab24bac.jpg

 

Always find this stage useful for revealing anything that has been missed. In this case the door hinges on the 105. So out with the Slaters plastic rodding again as it looks okay to me on the 309 bodies and sits nicely into the etched grooves.

 

143809597_RMweb05.jpg.7c173fc9e3c0c151311ead55544cccb6.jpg

 

582393942_RMweb06.jpg.50b80a7114897d1f6c8c377fbc4ddeac.jpg

 

All I need now is another warm day sometime next week, then I will have to choose the colours. Probably maroon for the 309 because I just haven't the skill for the later BR Blue/grey, but probably plain BR blue for the 105 as I can manage that.

 

Izzy

 

 

 

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Drawing the thread over a candle (or other wax object) can take the 'hairiness' out of it.

 

Jim

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13 minutes ago, Jan W said:

 

That stuff looks interesting Jan. How stiff is it, would it hang naturally which is always the problem I have - (no cheap jokes please!)

 

Jerry

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16 minutes ago, queensquare said:

 

How stiff is it, would it hang naturally

 

Jerry

 

Spock.gif.e2853eef2130a19f8975ec45bcb102a1.gif

 

(Sorry :D )

 

Tom.  

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It is extremely supple compared to normal fishing line.

I never used this very thin line so I'm afraid I don't know how that behaves.

 

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Thanks for all the thoughts over the 'hairy wire', and the likes for the crane. I have been taking another look at the thread that I used, which doesn't look quite so bad at normal close-up viewing distance, i.e. what I can see though my glasses at around the minimum distance of about 9", but does appear a bit over-heavy. I measure it at just over 0.2mm. This is multistrand 100% polyester by Gutermann and is supposed to be coated and less hairy than others, which it does seem to be. Just not smooth enough for this small scale. I did think about coating it somehow but worried that it might appear even thicker and/or get stiff and un-workable.

 

I've also looked again at the nylon thread by Korbond. This measures about 0.15 ( 38swg) but appears much finer/thinner because it is monofilament and has a reflectance about it.

 

 

2118129178_RMwebCS06.jpg.deba6e53d5b19bfb9a93f988f9a4464b.jpg

 

When I can I think I might try using this again, if I can work out how to get it to stay in place. The issue is time. Not that I don't have it at present, but it took several hours work to string the crane with the 'will do as it's told' polyester, and I can't really face spending that amount again for a while as It was very tiring work eye wise even under a good LED magnifying lamp. Plus I worry about any damage I might cause stripping the bits out of the crane to do it. We shall see....

 

regards to all

 

Izzy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I concur with your thoughts Izzy, I don't think many would have batted an eye lid at the wire if you had not mentioned it. As you say it looks pretty good even in the photos with a plain white background. Sometimes the risk for damage trying to undo something is not worth the correction. :-)

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Much better.  The small scale ship modellers use something for rigging but I’d need to find out what. 

 

Tim

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On my bench is more electronics.  I was asked by the loco's owner to add stay-alive bits to a class 08, chassis from Association kit, body from Farish.   The decoder is a Lenz Silver Mini, and was installed before the loco came to me.  

 

I've added a Zimo SACC16 stay-alive regulator (right hand end at top) and two 220uF tantalum capacitors below it (they'll sit behind the radiator in the 08).  The SACC16 has been reduced to its minimum size, and then wires are added to reach the two capacitors which hang below the circuit main. 

 

Of note are the positive and ground pads on the Lenz decoder, which is where any stay-alive circuit starts.  Simple to solder to, and recorded in the Lenz manuals for adding SUSI secondary decoder devices.  There are four pads, the positive is to the top (red wire) on the upper photo, and the ground to the bottom of the four pads (black wire).  The other two pads are for the SUSI signals and not needed for this use. 

 

484598121_class08fromaboveMay2019.jpg.f2701d5e9b329c6065d317349be30793.jpg1113200811_class08fromsideMay2019.jpg.9e24a0db1950455a264b1f757306af85.jpg

 

 

There is space for more capacitors - at least three could be fitted above the worm housing and motor drive coupling.  But, I found that 440uF was enough for 1/6th of a wheel revolution at low speeds without power, and that should be enough to deal with odd hesitations. 

 

Before the body goes back on, I'll be adding some thin insulation around the various devices to give extra protection against accidental short circuits. 

 

When there is space, I'm now using the SACC16 device, rather than simpler and smaller home-brew charging devices.  This is in part because its quicker to use an off-the-shelf item, and because the SACC16 is claimed to be more robust against over-voltage.  

 

 

Nigel

 

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I finished up my single slip - I missed a joggle and/or set in the stock rails, and the switchblades on the K crossing are a little short - but it technically does function.  I'm going to leave this as part of a diorama/photoplank I think:
 0R3SxGC.jpg

 

The body isn't perfect on this LMS cattle wagon, but I'm really pleased at how the underframe has come together - everything lines up and looks decent. It's in the paint shop now to come out in LMS light grey (D1840?):

 

aclzLlP.jpg

 

Unfortunately despite some assistance from @justin1985 and @queensquare my Jinty chassis just won't work. I've got a replacement etch so that's probably next in the shop, if I can stomach it :)

 

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1 hour ago, Lacathedrale said:

I finished up my single slip - I missed a joggle and/or set in the stock rails, and the switchblades on the K crossing are a little short - but it technically does function.  I'm going to leave this as part of a diorama/photoplank I think:
 

 

The body isn't perfect on this LMS cattle wagon, but I'm really pleased at how the underframe has come together - everything lines up and looks decent. It's in the paint shop now to come out in LMS light grey (D1840?):

 

 

 

Unfortunately despite some assistance from @justin1985 and @queensquare my Jinty chassis just won't work. I've got a replacement etch so that's probably next in the shop, if I can stomach it :)

 

 

Thats all looking good, if you can make a functioning double slip, you can make a working loco chassis. If you can make it to Railex, Aylesbury in a couple of weeks I will be there with my 2mm demo. Bring the Jinty along and we can have a look at it,

 

jerry

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