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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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One thing that can make a lot of difference is having a rest for your hand. Some people make up an L shaped one of a suitable thickness to suit the scale you are working in. Also be wary of honing the tips on a bow pen to a very fine point ensure the edge is not sharp or you can mark the surface. Advice given to me by an expert at lining models. 

 

Don

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Thanks Marshlane.

I looked into the easi-liner pens at little while back but decided not to purchase as I like the of a bow/ruling/draftsman pen's ability to adjust the width of the line. I started out working with a cheap pen (£6!) sourced from an art shop by a friend. It wasn't a pen bad, but nor was it great. I still have it, but generally only use it to paint handrails on the occasions I fit them after the rest of the painting/lining is done.

My current pens are a Kern (found new on eBay) and a Haff Bow Compass that I purchased directly from Haff. My Kern pen's blades are really slightly too long and it is very easy for them to flex (despite my best attempts to put not additional pressure on the pen!) which can make getting a consistent line difficult. The Haff on the other hand is a thing of beauty, its just a shame I don't have a pen grip for it. However, I get around this by closing up the compass and turning the removable blade attachment around by 180 degrees - slightly clunky but usable.

 

I have some nerve damage in my left arm/wrist which causes occasional trembling (I'm left handed). Therefore a rest for my wrist is essential (a fact I usually remember after I start lining) and I use nothing more complicated than an old Farish or Dapol stock box or the high lip on my painting tray (when I clear it off to gain sufficient space!).

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Very nicely done.

 

Don

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7 hours ago, Izzy said:

...Also ballasted the track and added gound signals as well as fitting the platforms. All slowly coming together now.

 

 

Rodding too! Looking tidy. 

 

Do you have a thread for this? I could have read it or missed it completely thus far.

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Finally finished off more of the "big four" wagons from Association kits that have been sat on my workbench for ages.

 

The interiors are just Tamiya "deck tan" with varied amounts of thinned down dirty mixes of acrylics. I think the GW open on the right looks best - this one has the strongest coat of deck tan and thinnest wash. Guess I need to think about loads for them now!

 

IMG_20190728_163326__01.jpg.83be72f02e5abb618745c4f8a6b87b35.jpg

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18 hours ago, Donw said:

Very nicely done.

 

Don

 

11 hours ago, richbrummitt said:

 

Rodding too! Looking tidy. 

 

Do you have a thread for this? I could have read it or missed it completely thus far.

 

Thanks both. Haven’t got a separate thread, just made the odd post. Have considered whether it would be of interest since it’s yet another of my almost totally ‘cardboard’ layouts at just 60”x10” with a folding sector plate fiddle board.

 

Izzy

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15 hours ago, justin1985 said:

Finally finished off more of the "big four" wagons from Association kits that have been sat on my workbench for ages.

 

The interiors are just Tamiya "deck tan" with varied amounts of thinned down dirty mixes of acrylics. I think the GW open on the right looks best - this one has the strongest coat of deck tan and thinnest wash. Guess I need to think about loads for them now!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_07/IMG_20190728_163326__01.jpg.83be72f02e5abb618745c4f8a6b87b35.jpg

 

Justin,

 

For me it's the LMS one. Finished wood seems to grey with age once any exterior treatment has gone. Though the GW wagon looks pretty new on the inside so it depends what you're going for. 

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On 29/07/2019 at 08:00, Izzy said:

 

 

Thanks both. Haven’t got a separate thread, just made the odd post. Have considered whether it would be of interest since it’s yet another of my almost totally ‘cardboard’ layouts at just 60”x10” with a folding sector plate fiddle board.

 

Izzy

Yes please, be interesting for us more recent arrivals!

 

cheers

 

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On 29/07/2019 at 08:00, Izzy said:

 

 

Thanks both. Haven’t got a separate thread, just made the odd post. Have considered whether it would be of interest since it’s yet another of my almost totally ‘cardboard’ layouts at just 60”x10” with a folding sector plate fiddle board.

 

Izzy

 

Well worth putting in its own thread I'd say, lovely stuff.

 

Jerry

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3 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

This Cornish cottage is nearing completion and is in situ for this photo. The chimneys need a bit more weathering, more flower gardens and a clothes line will be inserted in this scene eventually. This is my model of Harry Galls cottage which stood opposite St Erth Station entrance. With so many changes happening on the real St Erth these days it is great to be restoring the old order, albeit in model form.

 

 

That's exquisite, the weathering on the roof is particularly effective.

 

Jerry

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I am sure that's the real one so I look forward to seeing the model.

 

Such stunning work

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Looks damp enough for Cornwall!

 

Tim

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7 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

This Cornish cottage is nearing completion and is in situ for this photo. The chimneys need a bit more weathering, more flower gardens and a clothes line will be inserted in this scene eventually. This is my model of Harry Galls cottage which stood opposite St Erth Station entrance. With so many changes happening on the real St Erth these days it is great to be restoring the old order, albeit in model form.

 

Really wish we had a 'wow' button for things like this!  Can only echo Jerry's comments - amazing work.

 

Rich

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10 hours ago, queensquare said:

 

That's exquisite, the weathering on the roof is particularly effective.

 

Jerry

Hi Jerry - thanks for the compliment. For a long time I've wanted to have a go at this lichen/moss that is common on slate roofs in the St Erth area.           I used Tamiya Matt Yellow and Humbrol leather 62 combined with talcum powder to make a semi gunky mix that I then dabbed onto the roof. I think I can improve this technique more. - Steve

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3 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

Hi Jerry - thanks for the compliment. For a long time I've wanted to have a go at this lichen/moss that is common on slate roofs in the St Erth area.           I used Tamiya Matt Yellow and Humbrol leather 62 combined with talcum powder to make a semi gunky mix that I then dabbed onto the roof. I think I can improve this technique more. - Steve

 

You really need to do a step-by-step on how you've done that for us lesser mortals that want to copy, I mean replicate it :) 

 

Rich

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On 04/08/2019 at 10:12, MarshLane said:

 

You really need to do a step-by-step on how you've done that for us lesser mortals that want to copy, I mean replicate it https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_smile3.gif 

 

Rich

 

Hi Rich - Do you mean a step by step for the roof construction and painting or just painting?

 

Steve

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5 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

 

Hi Rich - Do you mean a step by step for the roof construction and painting or just painting?

 

Steve

Hi Steve,

I am tempted to say the former as I am sure it would useful to many of us, but I was meaning the latter!!

 

Really is a great effect and very realistic.

 

Rich

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12 hours ago, MarshLane said:

Hi Steve,

I am tempted to say the former as I am sure it would useful to many of us, but I was meaning the latter!!

 

Really is a great effect and very realistic.

 

Rich

 

Hi Rich and all,

 

I'm happy to share some notes.

Question - would it be more appropriate to answer your query in the "Any Questions Answered"  folder?

I don't want to break protocols 

 

Steve

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2 hours ago, 2mmKiwi said:

 

Hi Rich and all,

 

I'm happy to share some notes.

Question - would it be more appropriate to answer your query in the "Any Questions Answered"  folder?

I don't want to break protocols 

 

Steve

A separate thread would probably make it easier to find at a later date.

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4 hours ago, garethashenden said:

A separate thread would probably make it easier to find at a later date.

And I'm sure Anthony would welcome an article for the magazine which would disseminate it to the wider association membership. 

 

Jim 

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Posted (edited)

A little bit of a heads-up if I may for anyone like me who uses Nigel Lawton's drive belt system in locos. My CL 15 uses this and has run without issue since being completed in 2013.  However, the other day when I went to use it for track testing on Priory Road after ballasting and then weathering it struggled to move and mostly just sat there with the motor wirring away.

 

Eventually I discovered the drive belt had failed, split on it's outer face. Here's a shot.

 

311692366_RMwebCL1503.jpg.58faf02626dacabccd2a8f5dc933225e.jpg

 

Although they are supposed to be resistant to taking up a set, given the reduction used (3.6 -1) and the difference in size between the small and large pulleys it's probably not at all surprising, especially given the minimal running it has had of late while layout building has taken place.

 

Anyway, as luck would have it as part of the fairly crude and basic chassis construction I arranged things so that it screwed together and that the layshaft could be 'dropped out' by sliding the rubber tube couplings around - all that actually hold the layshaft in place - and a new belt fitted.

 

 

1719807986_NGF07.jpg.22f9f63c96a6e3b1f92a71130529d975.jpg

 

1873152658_NGF02.jpg.22c38ed93e54fc8bf01f6575ca7e5dc8.jpg

 

Some replacement belts came very quickly from Nigel Lawton, and I got enough to probably ensure they will see me out......once every 6 years doesn't seem too bad!  But I would advise that if you use the system, which I have found works very well, it might be a good idea to have some way of taking things apart to replace the belts.

 

Izzy

 

 

 

 

Edited by Izzy
spelling!
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All very new to 2mm Finescale, so thought I'd throw this out there, as its on my 'Digital Workbench'.

 

I have recently acquired a Class 24 model, which will be rewheeled with 2mm Association drop in wheels so that there is a reliable locomotive for testing my new 2mm FS trackwork, once the various pieces arrive from Shop 1.  However, I quite enjoy CAD, and one of the models that I want to be able to run on my future layout is an A4.  Having searched rmWeb and the web in general I found no reference to anyone who had done it before, although I severely doubt I'm the first!  The guys over at MRC/Copenhagen Fields must have done it for their Silver Link model for one.  So I decided to jump in at the deep end, rightly or wrongly.

 

Having studied a few kit built threads and watched Nick's Jubilee construction video several times, I managed to acquire a copy of the Doncaster Works drawings from 1933.  From this, I have taken all the measurements and resized down to 2mm, before transferring them to CAD.  My plan is to use Association bearings, axles, gears and wheels (pony, driving and trailing).  Yet to quite work out how the Cartazzi truck will work, but I suspect Dapol used a triangle frame approach with a pivot on the centre top point aligned with the middle of the chassis, which seems a sensible way of doing things.  

 

932861271_Screenshot2019-08-09at20_55_22.png.87a8d65d2cdfe4c5ca8fd3b7e767329f.png

 

Obviously this is only one side and shows the right hand side main and front bogie frames from the smokebox end.  Tabs to solder onto the PCB spacers are not yet shown.  I'd be interested to hear people's views on whether its best to use the Association motors or get a spare from Dapol?  Space I am guessing will dictate whether its in the tender or firebox.  It will also have a Zimo DCC coder fitted in somehwere, along with a small stay-alive.

 

Open to any comments/suggestions.  If im making any glaring errors, please do tell me, open to constructive criticism!

 

Rich

 

 

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