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nick_bastable

Whats on your 2mm Work bench

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4 minutes ago, nick_bastable said:

very nice and a improvement however  I believe the rods would be polished pre 1917

 

Nick

Reminds me of a now deceased colleague who used to tell the tale of how, as a young naval recruit on his first voyage, polished the ships bell to a super sparkling finish in order to gain approval, only to be given a right royal b£*(“ing for making the vessel more visible to enemy aircraft....

 

John

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I've done a quick reworking of the N1 chassis, it now has a Lawton 8mm motor driving via a 45:1 reduction (0.2MOD). This should give a maximum speed of around 65mph.

 

1991845632_N1ChassisAssembly5.jpg.90bf65aa43d082fb1f88ff02978e089d.jpg

 

1242304851_N1ChassisAssembly6.jpg.36eaf8aef0fd32ba05fc172403078a2e.jpg

 

I've also added some very basic representations of the coupling rods and hex nuts. Unsurprisingly, these revealed some clearance issues around the running plate which have now been resolved (in theory anyway!).

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Nick,

Thanks for that; I agree that the bright work would normally have been polished, at least up to 1915 so I have burnished the rods a little more. They now look quite "bright steely" but I need to play down their impact somewhat compared to the OOTB appearance.

Best wishes

John

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A bit of a diversion into real life modelling to give me a break from designing the N1.

 

Worsley_Works_51ft_Third.jpg.003c8dfccece28576c1ca6cf5011df65.jpg

 

It's the Worsley Works etch (that I started at the beginning of the year!) which needs bogies, roof, etc to complete. I think I'll have another go at sorting out the bufferbeam but I'm quite happy with how my first attempt at building an etched coach is going. I think the biggest challenge is going to be keeping the weight down!

Edited by Atso
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I reckon for your needs Steve, it's better to  have the coaches as free running as possible.  Weight is secondary to that. The main consideration is to get all the stock in the train to a consistent weight per item.

 

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On 19/09/2019 at 08:52, 2mmMark said:

I reckon for your needs Steve, it's better to  have the coaches as free running as possible.  Weight is secondary to that. The main consideration is to get all the stock in the train to a consistent weight per item.

 

 

Thanks Mark. I'll be using 2mm Association Gresley bogies so, based on past experience, I'm sure that they'll be free running.

 

I've now put together the brake third body.

 

469140888_WorsleyWorks51ftBrakeThird.jpg.5064dd5a18862921a32bb3e2e518ac74.jpg

 

There are a few construction wobbles on this one, but I hope that a bit of work with the soldering iron tomorrow morning will put these right.

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14 hours ago, Atso said:

 

Thanks Mark. I'll be using 2mm Association Gresley bogies so, based on past experience, I'm sure that they'll be free running.

 

I've now put together the brake third body.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/469140888_WorsleyWorks51ftBrakeThird.jpg.5064dd5a18862921a32bb3e2e518ac74.jpg

 

There are a few construction wobbles on this one, but I hope that a bit of work with the soldering iron tomorrow morning will put these right.

 

Are you going to use an etched roof on this? With almost any other type (plastic, resin, 3D-printed) that middle partition is going to get in the way.

 

Chris

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With advice from the VAG (use Tacky Wax), I managed to fix the Caledonian Express headboard to City of Birmingham, on loan to Camden shed from Crewe North for a few weeks (in my modeller's world). 

 

1891670242_CoB11.jpg.3459cf96b89049e1a1aaf3a21de3210d.jpg

 

335583248_CoB10.jpg.2d744eb75d857c9fe46325595d2d9654.jpg

 

 

692068709_CoB9.jpg.48eb8db3c19dffb006baf4e109e1a7b4.jpg

 

I think I'll see about colouring the border of the headboard.

 

Nig H

 

 

Edited by Nig H
pic remove
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6 hours ago, Chris Higgs said:

 

Are you going to use an etched roof on this? With almost any other type (plastic, resin, 3D-printed) that middle partition is going to get in the way.

 

Chris

 

Thanks Chris, I hadn't thought of that. I think some careful surgery is in order... 

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Further to Chris pointing out about the issue with using a 3D printed roof, I've removed the roof profile from the center partition.

 

20190922_092307.jpg.04dc2f267268dc51fb6d4f63f5811c27.jpg

 

Having already soldered some strengthening pieces in place, I took a pair of etch scissors to the offending section and snipped it out. I then used a marker pen to cover the tops of the surfaces so that I could see where I was filing and filed the remains flush with the top of the coach sides.

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A bit more progress with the Grampus (planked floor now in, but it would have been better to have checked before assembling the body and scribed the planks in), and a chassis for a clasp braked mineral. 

 

After finally finding a decent block of time for modelling, I’m starting to adapt to the size of things and work out ways of making jobs a bit less fiddly! I wish I’d started in earnest ten years ago though, my eyes aren’t what they were.

 

 

E2D6B8BC-1E26-40D9-ABA3-AFEEC77441AD.jpeg

8E674238-DFED-4FA8-8321-CC97A8466481.jpeg

E4D0FCFF-9FEE-462E-AA17-B3C54190F22E.jpeg

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The 8'6 Gresley bogies arrived on Saturday and so I built and fitted the first pair today.

 

20190923_151243.jpg.f75d84f032ba5eb9a4fc6b1499738646.jpg

 

20190923_194500.jpg.70deadd0085d688c795c94c24657de64.jpg

 

I've still got the footboards to make up and fit, but they can wait until another day.

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Here are a couple of pics of a Fowler 2-6-4 T chassis I've been working on. If it's any consolation to William, getting this chassis to run smoothly has been hard work, though mainly getting the valve gear to function without catching. The problem areas included the combination levers catching the bottom front and rear edges of the valve spindle guide box, the front crankpins catching the inside face of the crosshead and possibly the connecting rods glancing the rear ends of the slide bars. There seemed there were so many things going wrong it was hard to decide what really needed correcting. After several hours fettling I think I've sorted it all out and got a reasonably smooth-running chassis. The pics show a temporary motor arrangement I rigged up to run the chassis in Jif. I didn't want to use the intended Faulhaber motor for this so I used one of the Chinese ones I bought on eBay. I rinsed the chassi twice in my sonic cleaner to remove all the Jif.

 

1301683934_Fowler2-6-4Tlimochassis.JPG.905d6292049fe25277434e363f394df8.JPG

 

1432788175_Fowler2-6-4Tlimochassis(3).JPG.08dd1cb09c3b2ccb84a77dab6c8f94e1.JPG

 

 

I've still to add the rear crankpin washers and finish off the brake gear.

 

Nig H

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Over the last couple of days I've been picking up some of my unfinished wagons with a view to increasing my stock levels in readiness for Modbury's Warley appearance.  Along with 3, 4, and 5 plank wagons and a couple of outside framed vans, I thought it might be a good idea to add a couple more cattle wagons to the roster.

 

The cattle wagons will be of diagram W1/W5, and are the last of my 3D printed bodies.  For a change from the normal lever hand brake, I decided that one at least should be fitted with the DCI type of brake that some of the wagons were fitted with in the early 1900's.  With this in mind I had purchased one of the Association's 2-363 GWR 11'6" DC Cattle Wagon Underframe etches.  The wheelbase is wrong for these early cattle wagons being 11'6" rather than the 11'0" of the prototype but I decided that I could live with that slight discrepancy.

 

The immediate problem I discovered when I looked at the etch is that it doesn't actually cater for the DCI type brake at all!  The later DCII and DCIII can probably be from the etch (as it's designed for later versions of cattle wagons), however that isn't much help to me :huh:.  Because my 3D bodies include the solebars and headstocks, the only parts used from the etch were the central floor and some of the brake gear.  The axle box/spring assemblies being made up from the Association's GWR Oil Axlebox/Spring multi-layer etch (2-311).  The floor part had various unwanted appendages removed (one of the V hangers, brake lever hangers from one end, etc), and was folded up and the bearings soldered in place.  I prefer to glue the axle box/springs in place, so the bearing cups the protrude outside the W irons were filed flush.  One half of the brake assembly was used for the single sided brakes that these wagons were originally fitted with, this being soldered in place on the side with the remaining V hanger.  Missing from the underframe etch were the parts I required to fashion the DCI brake, namely the swan-neck push rod and the ratchet quadrant with drop link (to the swan-neck push rod).  The push rod was simply bent to shape from a narrow piece of waste etch, with a .3mm hole drilled at the V hanger end.  The ratchet quadrant and drop link were filed up from a further piece of waste etch, only being separated and given final shaping after the relevant holes had been drilled and filed.

 

The photo below shows the results of my labours, and in reality probably would have been as easy to do without using the Cattle Wagon underframe etch, hey ho!

940193932_IMG_3563copy.JPG.f49ff6ec84ed90beac56b89ae3e47baf.JPG

 

Ian

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I've just finished writing up a blog entry on this forum for my alterations to the N scale twin pack of LMS vans to get their width closer to that of the 2mm scale versions.   It took quite a bit of planning but actually going about removing roughly 1.5mm from the width was not as hard as I thought it might be.

 

Finished result (the 2 vans on the right) can be seen below (the left hand van is from the 2mm Association kit).

 

P1010035.JPG.c3b4242955fbab9b70b41754355f0686.JPG

Edited by John Brenchley
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That is beautiful work on the shop!

 

best wishes,

 

Alastair M

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On 26/09/2019 at 10:32, Ian Smith said:

Over the last couple of days I've been picking up some of my unfinished wagons with a view to increasing my stock levels in readiness for Modbury's Warley appearance.  Along with 3, 4, and 5 plank wagons and a couple of outside framed vans, I thought it might be a good idea to add a couple more cattle wagons to the roster.

 

The cattle wagons will be of diagram W1/W5, and are the last of my 3D printed bodies.  For a change from the normal lever hand brake, I decided that one at least should be fitted with the DCI type of brake that some of the wagons were fitted with in the early 1900's.  With this in mind I had purchased one of the Association's 2-363 GWR 11'6" DC Cattle Wagon Underframe etches.  The wheelbase is wrong for these early cattle wagons being 11'6" rather than the 11'0" of the prototype but I decided that I could live with that slight discrepancy.

 

The immediate problem I discovered when I looked at the etch is that it doesn't actually cater for the DCI type brake at all!  The later DCII and DCIII can probably be from the etch (as it's designed for later versions of cattle wagons), however that isn't much help to me https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_huh.png.  Because my 3D bodies include the solebars and headstocks, the only parts used from the etch were the central floor and some of the brake gear.  The axle box/spring assemblies being made up from the Association's GWR Oil Axlebox/Spring multi-layer etch (2-311).  The floor part had various unwanted appendages removed (one of the V hangers, brake lever hangers from one end, etc), and was folded up and the bearings soldered in place.  I prefer to glue the axle box/springs in place, so the bearing cups the protrude outside the W irons were filed flush.  One half of the brake assembly was used for the single sided brakes that these wagons were originally fitted with, this being soldered in place on the side with the remaining V hanger.  Missing from the underframe etch were the parts I required to fashion the DCI brake, namely the swan-neck push rod and the ratchet quadrant with drop link (to the swan-neck push rod).  The push rod was simply bent to shape from a narrow piece of waste etch, with a .3mm hole drilled at the V hanger end.  The ratchet quadrant and drop link were filed up from a further piece of waste etch, only being separated and given final shaping after the relevant holes had been drilled and filed.

 

The photo below shows the results of my labours, and in reality probably would have been as easy to do without using the Cattle Wagon underframe etch, hey ho!

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_09/940193932_IMG_3563copy.JPG.f49ff6ec84ed90beac56b89ae3e47baf.JPG

 

Ian

 

Do you have pictures or lot numbers for W1 fitted with DC1 brakes? All I have seen were for lever brakes and then DCIII brakes.

 

Chris

 

Edited by Chris Higgs

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8 hours ago, Chris Higgs said:

 

Do you have pictures or lot numbers for W1 fitted with DC1 brakes? All I have seen were for lever brakes and then DCIII brakes.

 

Chris

 

Chris, there is a photo in the GWR Wagons bible of no. 68409 of lot L441 built in 1904 which has DCI brakes. To quote Atkins, when detailing the W1 diagram "from 1894 to 1911, many more wagons were built, at first with a lever brake on one side only, then DCI, but the last 350 with DCIII. ... DCIII conversions included 125 wagons originally built with DCI." According to the listing earlier in the book, L441 was for 50 wagons so at least a further 75 wagons with DCI brakes were presumably built on other lots.

Ian

Edited by Ian Smith
Corrected date in quote
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This morning I added in the stone wall which has been white washed. I now need to find a domestic gate to fill the gateway.

Does any know a good range of etched gates available in 2mm?

After I get the gate in there is another sign to go on the wall - keeping up the intense advertising :-)

fullsizeoutput_b29.jpeg

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9 minutes ago, nick_bastable said:

excellent how did you manage the weathering moss etc on the roof ?

 

Nick

HI Nick - The moss is made simply from mixing matt yellow and Humbrol Matt 63 leather to a suitable shade and then combing with talcum powder. Then it's a process of carefully daubing it on the roof with a stiff brush a little at a time, building up the effect. I advise following a photo to get an idea of the typical places and ways it form up. The talcum powder is quite important because it stops the fluid affect of the paint. Maybe some kind of sponge material could do a similar effect

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A bunch of 0-8-0s by Lone Star Treble O Trains for me... kitbashing e'm into replicas of the Treble O Lectric 0-8-0s but using the original coupling rods. (Since I don't have the best budget)

7B1BEF44-123B-40DB-A4F3-9CBF0A64FD4F.jpeg

9205A022-06A1-42C7-8F4E-1E2F07F94E55.jpeg

Edited by Max's Model Railway
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For 2mm Kiwi:

 

You could try: https://www.yorkmodelrail.com/n-scale/n-scale-1

 

They have an interesting range of gates, fencing etc and lots more besides..... If this link doesn't work for you, Google York Modelmakers or York Model Rail

 

best wishes,

 

Alastair M

Edited by A Murphy
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I have been waiting to finish off my Fence Houses Black 5 for ages. The main issue was what to do about the BR mixed traffic lining. When Fox brought out a transfer pack for this I thought the problem was solved. I've just applied the transfers and the pics below show the results. Most of the loco lining has been done using the specific lining pack but the valances on the left hand side have been done with the Fox general BR mixed traffic pack. I could have used the specific pack but I thought it would be useful to see how I got on with the general pack. For the latter, you have to apply a red/grey line first then once fully dried apply a black line down the middle of the red and grey lines. The specific pack includes a clear gap between the red and grey lines.

 

64839998_MyBlack530.jpg.f475f5f3e8d7fd33e5ce43e5ad474e53.jpg

 

 

1489455885_MyBlack532.jpg.776a2a86db0c5c55ac1221c5c3e38513.jpg

 

The pics above look OK ish to me apart from one or two specific areas. The pics below show these in closeup.

 

476539715_MyBlack530a.jpg.c25667cf6a669a4ca2f1e41c93aad07b.jpg

 

The valance  uses the general lining pack, and the radii available for the red/grey are too tight for the radius of the valance so to line up the ends of the transfer, the middle of the curve has dropped over the edge of the valance.

 

2060965969_MyBlack530b.jpg.ddcaeb895e0f89d7c2962473c7aa93fe.jpg

 

Getting the black in the middle of the grey/red on the curve was a struggle for me. I think you can tell that the lining fills almost the entire depth of the valance, which is 4" or 0.667mm in 2mmm scale. I think that at some points the transfer, even though there is only a very thin transparent edge to it, has ridden up over the edge of the footplate too.

 

589688599_MyBlack532a.jpg.9898289f5ed55ad733012491fb5a1d57.jpg

 

As far as I can tell, the specific lining pack doesn't have an item for the sharp curve in the valance just to the right of the cabside number, so I used the general lining pack for the red/grey, then tried applying a seperate black line on top of it. Apart from struggling with the radius of the black line, you can see that the line is wider than the gap between red and grey from the specific set.

 

For the tender I cut the lining panel into four quadrants and applied each separately. I did this as I considered the panel to be too big in width and height for the 2mm tender. And what fun it was getting the individual sections straight and in line, and the correct distance from the footplate, upper tender edge, and front and rear handrails. If anyone does use the transfers, for the tender I'd recommend viewing from a distance to check all the lines are straight and or perfectly vertical. Viewing up close (with a magnifying lamp in my case) helped get overlapping joins lined up but doesn't help with the other aspect so well.

 

The cab numbers are Modelmaster sets.

 

Having looked at the results of all my work, I'm very disappointed with the results. I'm sure many modellers would have made a better job of applying the transfers than me but I think that it's maybe expecting too much to get transfers that are close to scale and useable for this application. Next step will be to remove the transfers and restore the paintwork.

 

Nig H

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