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DOCJACOB

LNER GRAIN WAGON

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As a newcomer and currently battling with a NBR 0-4-2 kit in 7mm i  mentioned that I may get to Ludborough (weather permitting) today to play with some full size bits. There are 3 of these wagons at Ludborough and there removal from an isolated stretch of track near Louth North signal box is documented on a website: just "google" Daves Railpics of Lincolnshire.

 

I also understand they are unique and the only surviving examples. For the record they are 203834, 187994 and 203814 though dont ask which is which!

 

I think one was chosen for preservation work by the Tuesday working party and very gradually over many years things progressed. I volunteered back in 2011 and fortunate to be allowed to do some work on the wagon while on warfarin for my DVT. Things have progressed further and bits were removed, taken to my garage, cleaned up, painted and returned. I regretably dont have images of all of the breakgear laid out on my garage floor! Currently we await the frame for the door hatch and then it really is pretty much the final leg. I'll try and post some more recent images when I visit

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Edited by DOCJACOB
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A slightly more up to date image. Today was to be a door frame measuring day but my triathlete friend who was supposed to be helping me doing this had a slight cycling accident.

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At last a good clear day. My triathlete mate made the frame and initial fit last week width was out by 1/4 inch, rest was perfect.  Returned it to him and shaved 1/8th off each side. Got busy with the paint brush and transported the frame to Ludborough this AM. Initial trial fit was perfect. Rustled up a couple of helpers and it was out with the drills, spanners and some rather large bolts. To hold hinges, frame and steel section on wagon needed 4 1/2 inch bolts, I plan to replace them with 5 inch bolts ASAP. 3 1/2 inch coach bolts to hold door frame to wagon. 

 

first image shows frame positioned and lightly secured at the top with a large piece of wood underneath to wedge it safely in position initially. Last two show the door in position on the wagon. 

 

And before anyone comments I know the lower strap is missing a bolt, for reasons i cant remember its in my tool bag instead of on the wagon. God knows why. 

 

Next job is door fixings to keep it shut. 

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Good to see you're progressing well with this unusual wagon!  I remember seeing them in BR service at various places in the Eastern Counties, along with the more familiar steel grain hoppers - they seemed to survive a long time for pre-Nationalisation wagons.

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Good to see you're progressing well with this unusual wagon!  I remember seeing them in BR service at various places in the Eastern Counties, along with the more familiar steel grain hoppers - they seemed to survive a long time for pre-Nationalisation wagons.

Glad to see one's survived; I remember seeing one in the Bristol area as late as 1973 or'74. Am I correct in thinking the wooden-bodied Great Western one was very similar?

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As far as I'm aware (and I do not consider myself a GWR expert) the nearest GWR type may be number 42239 a Dia V20 Lot 1006 convertable van at Didcot. I say nearest as the 3 at Ludborough are non-convertible from 1937. Strangely I understand the LNER persisted in building wooden bodied grain wagons. As regards seeing one in Bristol a bit of the beaten track but a 3 were in Grimsby area in 1972 not impossible I suspect.   

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Been a bit busy decorating a room at home so today was first chance to get back to the grain wagon. Arrived to find we had squatters in the shape of a pair of swallows. They had chosen the to enter via the ventilator hood so were rather surprised when the door swung open. This meant I was limited in what I could do so stuck to outside jobs; mainly putting on both the handles for the corner steps. I then headed off to see the other 2 wagons in the hope of finding some fittings to use to secure the door shut. As you can see on wagon 1 they may well beyond saving, wagon 2 completely AWOL including all the door and frame. By now had been working for about 5 hours so as the rail was starting headed home 

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I find wagon bodies on farms a good source for small fittings like that, often the owners are quite happy to part with them for one of the lower value beer vouchers.  You might not get the exact right fitting, buts its better than something from B&Q!

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Not much to report on but I did go on a scrounge and confirmed a rumour that in the dim amd distant past some replacement steps had been laser cut. I found 10 with backing plates. I also found a support block for the handle at the wagon end. It appears on closer visual inspection someone (not me) had bolted the handle in place but omitted to place the mounting block. I have a funny feeling they didnt bolt it in place on the roof either. At least I know about it now rather than finding myself swinging off it later!

 

I then gave myself a real treat and did some oiling of the axleboxes of some wagons that had already been moved from the headshunt. If we had thought a bit more maybe the order of events was wrong? 3 wagons 15 litres of oil! I enclose images of the one of the CCT axleboxes. This one was in a reasonable state to start with!

 

Image 4 shows the state of the pad and wick on removal. 6 and 7 show topping up the reservoir after first fill and replacement of the front cover. A truely vile afternoons work!

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DOCJACOB

It`s a treat to hear from somebody who`s actually doing some preservation. Keep up the good work with the Grain vans

Lochty

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Finally got to Ludborough this weekend as I had been busy helping my youngest daughter organise herself for her Duke of Edinburgh overnight hike. 

 

Arrived to find she had moved onto the main line while some major shunting was undertaken for the the new carriage shed. This was a big bonus as the end I got to work on is normally tight against a BR GUV and it is a real juggling act to to do any work. The other bonus was we were much nearer some electrical power. The side you see today is normally facing away from the public and is usually awkward to get at, having to clamber over bits of track, brambles and nettles. 

 

Firstly an urgent job as I had to point out the hand rail was only held in with 2 bottom bolts (not me honestly) and a heavy shunt could have some unpleasant consequences. Then as the chaps had a sedate lunch it was a chance to crack on with the steps. 

 

Not sure 100% on the positions as the published line drawings I've seen differ from the real thing on another siding. However passing comments were favourable so must have got it pretty much right. 

 

Each step has a metal support plate on the inside and the steps on the outside are held in place with x3 M12 bolts 60mm long.  

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Too hot to do lots today. Put the 4 steps on at the other end and then out with the primer. All 4 wheels wire brushed and painted. Fortunately no remedial repair jobs following her outing onto the main line the week before

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Proper job - keep up the good work - thanks to you future generations will have an LNER grain van to look at

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I've been doing something a bit different this week. Firstly the ex LMS Tube wagon from 1938 (492136 allegedly) was missing the top plant to the door. This wasn't pleasing to the eye so time to source a plank to fit. Nothing remotely likely to suit so during the week visited our local architectural salvage yard. Found an 8 foot length of teak, 2 inches thick and 8 inches wide. It then just got a whole lot better as the asking price was 3 ice creams for his grandchildren when they next visit the railway! Needless to say it was rapidly stuffed in the car and taken home. The door is 57 inches wide so a bit of sawing and painting and Saturdays main job was sorted. A bit of fettling was needed so had to climb on and off the wagon quite a few times, pretty unpleasant as currently its a mobile coal store. No power that far down the siding so had to carry it back and forward for drilling. Despite my best efforts and a prolonged search in the stores coach the bolts currently fitted are not 100% satisfactory.

 

A quick cuppa and out with the paint brush so the Grain wagon now has black wheels. 

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You seem to be doing a good job there, keep it up. It's nice to see someone taking an interest in wagon preservation. all too often we see lines of wagons on heritage lines all looking un-loved and untidy!

 

Using metric bolts....aaaaaaagh! But need must! I try to use original thread bolts when I'm doing bus restoration (my full-time job).

 

Could I suggest you oil the springs? If the wagon's likely to be shunted around a bit of oil won't go amiss.

 

Well done.

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Totally agree Roy regarding the metric issue and unloved wagons but as you say needs must. The bolts for the steps were a special order and when I went in the first question was what's it for? Once they saw what i was doing they were really helpful. The grain wagons arrived at Ludborough 15 years ago in the state of disrepair seen earlier. I got involved by default and its sad to say 2 wheels were primered a number of years ago. So long ago in fact it was better just starting from scratch again and do all 4 

 

I think we have already opened a discussion on which is the biggest problem facing preservation; money, volunteers, time etc. 

 

Finally on the spring issue one of my helpers hoped that all the trouble we are going to re-hanging a door wont go to waste. Sad to say that she may after a few days in the limelight join the line of rusting wagons and possibly come out for the rare photographic event only.  She however will start from a better state than the others. 

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I know the feeling, I've got a shed full of old buses to be getting on with!

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Not much to report due to holidays. A rather nice cruise round the Baltic to be exact. I have been thinking about the next job though and have a possible solution.

 

The roof is currently covered in some sort of bitumen felt, but it is black when ideally it needs to be white. 

 

I recently had to paint some Schreiber fitted wardrobes, and was advised that Zinbin shellac based primer adheres to most things. Well nothing ventured means nothing gained so out with a trial piece of roof. Amazingly it seems to look acceptable.

 

The enclosed image top-bottom is: raw roofing felt, primer only and finally primer and a generous coating of undercoat. 

 

I think the rollers will be out next weekend? 

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Dojacob

I gather from your last post that your feeling a little bit disallusioned, dont be, most  preservation society`s members dont give a S**t  about railway wagons my first project was a Place wagon ( which turned out to be the last one in existance ) I cleaned it up, painted it black only to discover it should have been painted olive green, so I can understand your frustration. Most railway society`s have this attitude, dont worry about this the work you are doing on your wagons is nationaly important - no body else is doing this - as far as I can see there is only you and I actually doing preservation on  this forum.

Sometimes it`s hard to motivate yourself, but there are out there people who apreciate your endevours - more power to your elbow!

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Thanks for the comment, I sort of drifted into "wagons" and yes I look at the siding and sometimes feel sad. Realistically I recon I'll save 2 grain wagons out of the 3 and on the +ve side its better than none!

 

Hope to get cracking on the roof and then god knows which one. I have a few ideas for quick fixes and at least they would be presentable to the public and not some escapees from a scrap yard!

 

By the way signals look great, we have a few GNR Somersaults at Ludborough and they look good to, though one has been placed incorrectly I think (I'll send an image)

 

I also put a link to your work on the North British Railway Study Group Forum for you

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An early start.

 

Firstly an image for Lochty of the starter at the south end of the platform at Ludborough. Its not got its arm yet as some major track works are planned here and if it was fitted now it would take anything off at coach cant rail height. One of 3 somersaults at LWR.

 

I did mention I was unhappy with the bolts on the wagon plank and I changed them next (honest; a subtle difference as the are bigger)

 

Finally as the rain started it was plan B. Ended up warming up, oiling round, coaling and generally giving TLC to Spitfire the Barclay 0-4-0 tank in preparation for the running day tomorrow.  Here she is going to bed. 

 

Finally been advised masonry paint will be another solution for the roof, as its much cheaper and water based so easier to roller guess whats going on the roof next! 

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DOCJACOB

I agree with you on the signals position, could this be one of the rare occasions where the S&T department get there bit done before the Permenent way department alter the trackwork?, as it stands anybody puting there head out of a window on the road to the left of the signal would be at risk of getting slapped in the coupon with a signal arm. The promenent signal No,track circuit diamond and ladder hoop are all comprimises Health & Safety legislation ect, at least with my NBR signals there is no ladder to put a hoop on.

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Finally after a number of personal commitments got back to this project. First two images are before and after of my start to attempt at un-doing a peeling problem with the initial "primer-undercoat" used many years ago. 

 

I suppose after all these years of continual preservation confronting the same job twice was to be expected!

 

Next we headed up the ladder to the roof and its a bit worse than I expected. There are no hinges for the hatches and one hatch cover is definitely not original. The good news is that Joe Public doesn't get to see this area closely so a bit of "fiddling" can be excused. Brushed the masonry paint as I may get away with just one coat, I've had a further look and unfortunately another visit will be required! 

 

I think the health and safety issues of clambering on top of the van roof with a pot of paint, brushes and no safety rope are best forgotten. ( no comments/hints please ) 

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DOCJACOB

You have not posted for a while, are these grain vans going to restore themself - probably not, now the following excuses are acceptable to RMwebbers:

Excuse 1 ; I am dead, and cannot restore LNER grain vans

Excuse 2:: My hand is trapped in the Corn Flakes packet and I am awaiting rescue from the fire brigade

If your excuse is none of the above, then get yourself down to Ludborough and sort it out

P.S. Pete Westwater got an advanced copy of a new book ( he had contributed photo`s ) The Leven & East of Fife Railway - there is a cracking photo of LNER grain vans at Cameronbridge Station and a good chance your grain vans were once in Kirkland yard ( where trains for Cameronbridge were marshalled ).

Regards Lochty no more

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