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Chubber

A free-lance GWR themed terminal station building for Bear's End

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Always a pleasure to see you buildings. Lovely station with a lot of details.

Still learning from the way you do it.

Did you make the chair your self or did you buy it somewhere.

 

Regards,

Job

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Lovely jubbley.  Love the blue brick reveals around doors, windows and quoins.  Fantastic internal detail to boot.  What was the build time on this?

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Always a pleasure to see you buildings. Lovely station with a lot of details.

Still learning from the way you do it.

Did you make the chair your self or did you buy it somewhere.

 

Regards,

Job

 

Hi, Job,

 

Thank you for your kind remarks, the chair is folded up from a thick writing paper 'square' shape and twisted then coated with shellac and painted.

 

 

Lovely jubbley.  Love the blue brick reveals around doors, windows and quoins.  Fantastic internal detail to boot.  What was the build time on this?

 

Thanks, PR,

 

I can't really estimate the hours, just a 1" strip of blue brick corner takes about  92 separate 1mm cuts, then you slip and have to start again!

 

Doug

Edited by Chubber
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Brilliant work Chubber, very neat and crisp. Great details too, especially the brick work, and I like the idea of bracing the cardboard shell with stripwood.

This is just the sort of structure I'd like to be building one day.

 

One question though - what scale is this? - looks like 7mm?

 

Steve R

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One question though - what scale is this? - looks like 7mm?

 

Steve R

 

 

Thank you Steve, that's very flattering, it's 4mm/1ft, the building is about 10"/250mm long.

 

Doug

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Hi Doug, that really is lovely.

 

One question though, what glue do you use to glue your walls and triangular tabs together? If it's water-based, do you have any problems with warping?

 

cheers

 

Jason

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Bear's End [formerly Bear's Vale] was a through station until 1868 when the Langport Earthquake  both damaged the western tunnel bore and flooded the valuable seams of Cornish Pasty fillings mined at Wheal Gravy, further west.

Good to see a man who takes historical research seriously. This is why your models are so good: They are based on a real context and it shows.

 

:locomotive:

 

Like Job I was also captivated by the chair. It's just one very small detail in your superb station, but it simply has just the right character of, well, a chair!

 

The canopy is brilliant. I hope to use your glazing technique next time I'm doing something like this. You have really proven its worth.

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Thank you  to every one who has taken the time to post a 'like', thank you Mikkel, from a modeller of your diameter, er, calibre that is praise indeed!

 

Jason, I use a water-resistant P.V.A. like 'Evostik Resin W' for most of my builds, and have no warping problems. Having said that most models have more than one layer of card and plenty of bracing, both card and wood-strip. The triangular webs shouldn't be there really, I had to add them to support the L.E.D.s when I discovered the perspex under-canopy leached light all round.

 

Doug

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Thanks Doug, I'll have a look out for an equivalent over here. Elmer's is not so great.

 

Your interiors really are fantastic.

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Hi, Dottore and JCL,

 

My interiors walls, dado rails table, chair are self made on the pooter, with bits from Scalescenes models. The doors are home made printer jobs too, the tiled floors are from the interior of bank etc envelopes, just anything that looks right really!

 

Doug

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Some stonkingly good modelling there Chubber, and yet another excellent thread that I've only just come accross.

What is the origin of the brickwork?  I can't tell if its a high quality brickpaper, or have you produced it yourself?

many thanks,

Dave.T

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Doug will reply, but I can tell you that the brickwork is from scalescenes, scratchbilders yard.

 

And he has also correctly used English bond for the main walls and stretcher bond for the chimney stacks.

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I love that Andy fellow............he's going to expect another fiver in the post now, 10/10 and a red star!

 

Doug

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Hi chubber,

there are some really great models here, there is certainly nothing wrong with card modelling, these look excellent and I think its about 'uniformity' when it comes to sighting buildings on a layout made with the same materials, and you have that right, sometimes it can look wrong were you have a card building then a plastic buiding next to each other.

I take it you use card for the most part in your modelling?

greast stuff

cheers

Peter

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Thank you, Peter,

 

I too believe there  is nothing wrong with card and paper as a modelling material, it pre-dates plastic by many years. I have long admired your work, signal boxes especially as they are quite 'bijou' and fiddly to make in the smaller sizes. here is a box I've built  based on Isfield, designed by Alan Mansfield of ABM models, who now caters for many Southern/LBSCR enthusiasts. The curve window tops and round-ended lights above are a difficult subject to model cleanly.

 

post-106-0-61185200-1375875156_thumb.jpg

 

 

Card lends itself to the rural vernacular especially, the temptation to 'over distress' is huge as it can be so easily bent or deformed, I'm still in two minds as to whether or not I have overdone the slope/collapse on the lean-to on this cottage group, for example. Save the florists wire down pipes, [scrounged] the glazing [ex-packaging] scraped cocktail sticks and BBQ skewers for guttering the whole is card, Scalescenes paper, and cost less than, say, £3.00p?

 

post-106-0-97077100-1375874979_thumb.jpg

 

Occasionally I look admiringly at models on RMWeb, then tot up the costs of a large factory, in etched window frames and plasticard and reckon it represents the best part of several bottles of Scottish Laughing Water, which is fine for professional modellers who see some return on their efforts!

 

It may even deter beginners and drive them into the arms of the 'PlonkCraft' manufacturers on the premise that if they must spend £30 on bits and pieces before attempting such a model, they might as well buy it ready-made for near the same price and have spare time to watch all the repeats of Michael Portillo's Great British Railway Journeys.

 

Card modelling also does its bit for recycling, you are constantly on the look-out for materials....Now where did that box go to? The one the wife's new bra came in? There must be a terminus station or a at least an MPD in that card...

 

 

Best wishes,

 

 

Doug

Edited by Chubber
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Doug, that signal box is formidable. If anyone has proven the value of card modelling it's you! In my opinion your work is some of the best on here, and I honestly don't think of it as "card" - I just see world class modelling.

 

Plus, you get the scottish laughing water! :declare:

Edited by Mikkel

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Chubbs, that cottage group is absolutely stunning, you deserve an extra bottle of the smooth and peaty...

All the best, Dave.

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...My interiors walls, dado rails table, chair are self made on the pooter, with bits from Scalescenes models. The doors are home made printer jobs too,

You wouldn't consider sharing the artwork (I have some interiors I can exchange with you)? Not the scalescenes stuff, obviously (although a listing of what you used would be helpful

 

iD

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Doug,

On the cottages, Have you used the Scalescenes Iron for the roof's?

If so. how does it look in the flesh?

I like texture, but accept the reality is that brickwork at 1/76 is, in reality, going to look flat, but I am a bit more concerned with the way GI looks.

Are you happy with it, if it is SC?

 

Khris

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Hullo, All,

 

My apologies for seemingly ignoring you, ID, I haven't come back to this thread for a while.

 

For the wall interiors I just print a strip of two colours with a double black/dark line to imitate a dado rail, the doors I adapt from door company catalogues, and all the fancy stuff comes from S'Scenes models, like the Timbered pub, which contains all sorts of stuff, the Terrace Backs, ditto, and general 'interesting paper' like envelope interiors. Some doors I design my self.

 

John Wiffen did a free download for an entrance ramp and steps for his large station which will yield all sorts of interesting textures...see.

 

http://www.scalescenes.com/R005steps/R005.html

 

The furniture and lineside junk download http://scalescenes.com/products/T004-Furniture-and-Lineside-Junk is useful for book cases etc but for settees I prefer to use balsa wood of the appropriate thickness rather than cut out lots of little layers.

 

Khris, I am happy with the S'Scenes plain corrugated, I chose to scribe down the lines of a lot of it, your mind then fools you into thinking it's all textured. Terminate the backing just before the edge of the 'corrugated' and that way you don't get a 1" thick edge to the roof. Brickwork need not be 'flat', I have filed down a 2" nail so that the end is brick sized, and use this to press in a few 'bricks' around windows or doors where your eyes are naturally drawn, again, it can fool the mind.

 

Remember, if you are using stone SC paper, get it the right way up!

 

The red tiles I print onto slightly textured A4 paper sourced at an art shop [i had to buy it, insert shuddering smiley] The right-hand roof isTX29 Aged CI, the left-had isTX30 Painted, which I am not quite so happy about.

 

Herewith, one or two of my thingies,

 

post-106-0-69542900-1376564243_thumb.jpg

 

post-106-0-79122900-1376564248_thumb.jpg

 

post-106-0-69006300-1376564250_thumb.jpg

 

post-106-0-67177400-1376564254_thumb.jpg

 

post-106-0-83993100-1376564259_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Best wishes,

 

Doug

Edited by Chubber
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Thanks for the response Doug.

Excellent and much appreciated as are the downloads.

 

Khris

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Thanks for the reply, link and nice pictures Doug. They will come in very handy. I'm not sure what my next building project will be after the OBL, but I'm sure you'll see some of your artwork (hem-hem) "recycled".

 

Regards

 

iD

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You're welcome. I print the glazed stuff onto self-adhesive A4 paper, stick them to acrylic then cut out the panes, then onto packeto-cornoflako.

 

D

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