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Nameplates, how original are they?


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In a similar vain to nameplates, i was looking at a scrap 08 in bescot the other day and thinking about flamecut numbers, with the amount of repaints and liveries these days would privitisation era 'flamecuts' be as collectable now as they are for locos scrapped in the 80s, i mean the ews livery 08 had its current number on the fuel tank side whereas originally it would have been on the cabside, locos scrapped back in BR blue days at the likes of gic berry tended to have numbers in the same place most of of their BR blue lives which to me makes them more 'authentic' as it were, ive certainly seen flamecuts with previous numbers still visible below the last one

 

 

Even 'flamecuts' can be replicated - I know of at least one chap who will make you up full-size replica comprising a steel panel in your required colour (green or blue) with authentic style numbers, data panel and depot sticker. They do look very smart indeed - I'm rather tempted to get a couple of my fave locos (20005, 20145, 45041) done to decorate the walls. And while he doesn't sear the edges with an oxy torch, I guess it could be done.

 

Another couple of chaps do very nice lasercut nameplates (usually in mdf) which look spot on, but are much lighter and much, much cheaper than metal originals or replicas.

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I'd have thought that the definition of a genuine nameplate would be one carried by the loco during its WORKING life, before it was preserved (if ever). In theory, there would only ever be two original plates therefore they are extremely rare and collectable. Hence the stupidly high price they go for. If a loco has carried multiple copies of said nameplates, Then they should reduce in value as they are not quite as rare. There would be some exceptions for famous locos of course. Also I believe the market for names off extant locos is nowhere near as boyant as most people consider the right place for them is on the loco they belong to.

Edited by Chameleon
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Also I believe the market for names off extant locos is nowhere near as boyant as most people consider the right place for them is on the loco they belong to.

No, its the same as every other antique, just because everybody knows where it came from doesn't mean there is no market for it.  Ask the Art & Antiques unit at the Met if you don't believe me, they've dealt with some relatively well known stolen railwayana in the past, just because you can't put it in an auction doesn't mean people won't trade in it.

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  • 4 years later...

Just came across this thread while browsing

 

As i understand it the A4 and A3 nameplates with the red backgrounds were for Sir Nigel's "favourite" locomotives. His choice.  No9 has always had a red background (and also while masquerading as Osprey, but there are pictures of her as Osprey with a black background). The Red background for FS was Alan Peglar's prerogative

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On 06/02/2013 at 15:24, jwealleans said:

The lettering on the A3 plates was changed during the lifetime of the LNER and the plates replaced so those on 4472 aren't the originals.  I believe the ones she carries in service are replicas but the originals are held by the NRM.

 

The nameplates on 4498 were not replicas, at least not into the 1980s.  They spent two years under my parents bed while the loco was overhauled at Carnforth.

The early A1/A3 plates cracked and the LNER had to recast them in 1926 with bigger flanges and ribs were cast and fitted in replacement. The number of fixing boltswas increased from 4 to 11 and the splasher top plate thickness also altered.

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Re the Merchant Navy "coffee tables", there will be a photo of the one for 21C1 in the next HMRS book when it is published (in proof but the printer is currently closed). It looks to me like a transfer on the table, rather than anything 3-dimensional.

The book: "Southern Style - Southern Railway" by John Harvey.

Jonathan

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