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A Nod To Brent - Fun , friendly, frivolity and happy days in the South Hams 1947.


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2 hours ago, gwrrob said:

For those with deeper pockets Polak do some rather nice gorse bushes, for a price. I decided to redo mine myself using a base of dyed Woodland Scenic poly fibre. Here I soaked it overnight in a raw umber acrylic paint mix. When dry I stretched it out and fixed it to the layout with neat pva, again leaving to dry. Then a 50/50 water pva solution was applied and the dark green Noch leaves were generously added and again left to dry. The final touch is to add the yellow flowering foliage from WS to the top. Gorse generally flowers all year round and is more profuse than you'd think.

 

1403683211_DSCN6792(2).JPG.884644ae73c8305a707d28f44778a812.JPGDSCN6793_(2).JPG.d9ce07c9342c66ebaebbca44b7d0b472.JPG

 

I think you're going to have a visit from this chap overnight to take samples...

 

et.jpg.052827ac12ffe11a6ed0ed3e3a0cce96.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, gwrrob said:

For those with deeper pockets Polak do some rather nice gorse bushes, for a price. I decided to redo mine myself using a base of dyed Woodland Scenic poly fibre. Here I soaked it overnight in a raw umber acrylic paint mix. When dry I stretched it out and fixed it to the layout with neat pva, again leaving to dry. Then a 50/50 water pva solution was applied and the dark green Noch leaves were generously added and again left to dry. The final touch is to add the yellow flowering foliage from WS to the top. Gorse generally flowers all year round and is more profuse than you'd think.

 

1403683211_DSCN6792(2).JPG.884644ae73c8305a707d28f44778a812.JPGDSCN6793_(2).JPG.d9ce07c9342c66ebaebbca44b7d0b472.JPG

Scenically, that's a nice effect, Robin, but would the PW Department of the Great Western Railway have allowed such growth in such proximity to the main line?

 

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2 hours ago, gwrrob said:

Gorse generally flowers all year round and is more profuse than you'd think.

 

I rather think that its a bit too profuse even for Brent although I suppose it makes a difference where you are.  We have a lot around here but its more individual bushes.  Perhaps its a US variety, though it sure looks the same:unsure:

      Brian.

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2 hours ago, gwrrob said:

In other news and it's great to see 5239 Goliath back in service in South Devon, my kids favourite, it's been a long time, getting ready for the PDSR reopening next week. Seen here in the new bay platform at Paignton.

 

goliath.jpg.1981bbeef67c61df2abcdf01af978482.jpg

 

Where is the new platform situated, please?  I don't remember much space there!

   Brian.

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1 minute ago, brianusa said:

 

Where is the new platform situated, please?  I don't remember much space there!

   Brian.

 

If you wait a couple of weeks I'll take some photos Brian but it's further down from the station building side.;)

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On 30/06/2020 at 08:48, gwrrob said:

What a glorious photo for lots of reasons.

 

Nice telegraph wires...

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Today I'm having a go at making brambles [ horsehair etc] and plan to use them on open ground. Those against a wall look fine as you can judge height comparison and they would be cut back but how high do they grow in the open when left. I want them to enhance and not dominate. Feedback welcome.

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All shaping up very nicely.....

Height of brambles - now there's a question, my own ones are no more than 6ft as my concept was any taller they looked overbearing and they could also start loose stability as they couldn't support themselves and fall over.

However if they are in a a large group against a wall/building etc then they can grow very tall.

I have seen brambles growing up tree trunks and low branches.

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Posted (edited)

8-10 feet would be a rough guide for a free standing bush I guess.

 

Edited by Tim Dubya
Cairn Terrier called Bobby
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10 minutes ago, Captain Kernow said:

Of gorse you do.

 

 

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A good height for unsupported brambles is 6ft.  Any taller and the weight of the upper growth causes it to collapse in on itself.  I used to go brambling with friends when I was a child down a green lane and they looked enormous, but when I went back to the spot many years later, after moving away, they were only up to the top of my head.

 

Roja

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8 hours ago, KNP said:

All shaping up very nicely.....

Height of brambles - now there's a question, my own ones are no more than 6ft as my concept was any taller they looked overbearing and they could also start loose stability as they couldn't support themselves and fall over.

However if they are in a a large group against a wall/building etc then they can grow very tall.

I have seen brambles growing up tree trunks and low branches.

 

When I moved to the Manor House, there were several brambles that grew up the side of the garage, and carried on up the sloping roof.  the bottom end of them was approaching the size of a sapling.

 

Adrian

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Fascinating plants, brambles!  As I stated in my previous reply, they very rarely grow above 6ft if unsupported, but with their curved thorns acting like grappling hooks, the can ramble over and up walls, trees etc.  They also spread by suckers growing at points where their stems, especially near the tips,  touch the ground!  They are one of natures' survivors and difficult to remove if they are somewhere unwanted, but they are a haven for wildlife, offering food and shelter.  Oh, and there's around 330 different species in Britain!

 

Roja

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36 minutes ago, A Murphy said:

Have I blundered into GQT by mistake???

 

I might have said before but I was into gardening long before I took up railway modelling.

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On 30/06/2020 at 17:18, gwrrob said:

Gorse generally flowers all year round

My dad used to quote: "Kissing's in season when the gorse is in bloom."

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Posted (edited)

'ere don't Wills do sheets of slates? they even incorporate the odd slipped one too ;)

Edited by Tim Dubya
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You need a night on the tiles chum.:D Seriously, who me :rolleyes:,  that's superb craftsmanship my old fruit.

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