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Very useful, not egg sucking at all- the guy who supplied it advised to use a metal drill bit and drill slowly

 

I think if I take both approaches I should be OK!

 

Another tip is to dimple the acrylic with the drill bit.

Get a piece of scrap wood and drill through it with the same size drill.

With the drill bit still in the scrap wood place the point over the dimple in the acrylic and clamp the wood, acrylic and a peice of scrap wood under the acrylic to make a sandwich.

The top peice of wood acts as a guide to keep the drill steady and the bottom piece of wood prevents the drill suddenly breaking through and snatching.

 

One day I will tell you how to drill perfectly clean holes in 0.002" thick aluminium without any burrs. :boast:

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thanks David, lovely to hear from you - how's yours going? I've not had a look for a while as I've been busy with work 

 

ATB

 

Peter

 

Hi Peter

 

Like wise nice to hear from you as well, Haymarket 64B is progressing slowly at the moment as I wanted to completely redecorate the room the layout is located in.

 

My darling wife insisted I redecorated the lounge and kitchen first, thats all completed and apart from new LED lighting and carpet so is my model layout room as well.

 

While this has been going on I have been completing many of the out building located around Haymarket MPD and Norman Saunders (Just Tracks Ltd) has been building quite a few of the hand built pointwork required.

 

I have also increased the Haymarket loco fleet as well by adding some new locomotives.

 

Also I have been working on a long term joint project with Gareth who runs Replica Railways in Swindon, we are making up Five Bachmann A2/3 conversions using Graeme King's resin and etched parts, although Gareth has done the majority of the conversion works I have now finished of the two A2/3 loco bodies and tenders which are destined for Haymarket, the chassis still need to be completed.

 

I took some photos of them today while the sun was shining, I will post them on my thread later.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

Regards

 

David

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A sad day, but that's life.

 

As my many friends from this and other fora, know I've been suffering for the last 25 years with a lung condition with a long latin name which means I've become very sensitive to wood dust, and possibly other forms of dust as well. I've done pretty well, having been admitted to the Brompton in 1993 with less than a quarter of my lungs working.

 

Since then I managed to get back up to 96% efficiency after three years of massive steroids. However, since then the condition has steadily fought back with a series of relapses, and on my last visit to the hospital a couple of weeks ago, I was told my lung capacity is now down by about a third, and, in the consultant's words, " need to accept hat one will face a steadily declining quality of life."

 

Not good news, and despite many years of denial, while SWMBO and I were doing some gardening last weekend she pointed out that my lack of breath caused by even minor exertion, had gone too far. It wasn't long from that acceptance for us to agree that we really needed to take a long hard think about the future.

 

We all think we're going to last forever, even though we accept that we may creak bit as we age, but being told you will at some unspecified point be unable to even take the dog ror a walk is a bit of an embuggerance.

 

So at the weekend we jointly decided to look for a smaller place, not so far away from the family and closer to facilities, such as a hospital, Sainsbury's, theatre etc. This will allow us to focus on things that will give us pleasure and also means we don't get to an uncomfortable position of being forced to move when I'm really not up to it.

 

Of course this is a bit of a show stopper, but it's also an opportunity - we've got the oomph left for one last home build project, so we have decided to go for it now while we still do have that, rather than in a few years time when we don't.

 

All of which means that the time has come to stop building Waverley East, and start to take it up.

 

It's a bit of a big exercise, and as we plan to get the house on the market rapidly it needs to be undertaken quickly, but having let the thing grow like topsy, I did decide to be logical about the breakdown.

 

To start with, I'm cataloguing all the stock - well locos and coaching stock at least,

post-10395-0-79151300-1509448663_thumb.jpg

 

I'm also  very glad that I kept all the boxes - at least I can ensure that stock won't be damaged from being packed away until we land somewhere that a railway can be reconstructed.

post-10395-0-00542100-1509448678_thumb.jpg

 

So lessons learned...

 

1) A railway is never 'finished' This must be the fifth large railway I've built over the years, and in every case there were chunks  that hadn't been wired up or scenically finished before it was time to move on.

 

2) There's more to life than modelling. It's too easy to take your health for granted, and when it is threatened you realise that you need to focus on things that give pleasure, but not all of them need to be done at 4mm to the foot!

 

As an example, I'm halfway through doing my IAM Masters on this beast - it's the closest thing a civilian can get to a Police Class 1 licence and teaches you a lot about when to hurry on and when not.

post-10395-0-42214700-1509450326_thumb.jpg

 

3) You really can have too much stock! Unfortunately it's too easy to be tempted by the offers that come in from messrs. Hatton, Rails, Kernow and co, not to mention the odd exhibition where the bargains are just too tempting, but as a result of this I found that I now own:

 

* 92 assorted steam and diesel locos, including, 5 A1's. 5 A2's, and no fewer than 7 A3's!

* 193 different coacjhes, ranging from Ian Kirk Gresleys to Bachmann Mk 1 sleepers

* 78 different Peco points - with enough motors to power all of them

* Around 200 metres of code 75  track and half of that in well worn code 100

* Loads of different buildings in various states of repair

* Close to 70 1:76 model vehicles, with a frightening preponderance of buses and HGVs

 

4) Base boards that are simply put together are far easier to take apart. Also building on a constant gradient means you can never run round a train as it will run away down the siding when you unhitch the loco.

 

5) Lifting/ removable sections are a blooming nightmare - the track never aligns perfectly and always takes much care to ensure trans don't spectacularly fly off at speed!

 

6) Railways where trains go from somewhere to somewhere else, and then do some shunting/ looping to get back again are more operationally interesting

 

7) Having a big space means you can run proper long trains, but from 25' away you struggle to make out any detail

 

8) The number of rivets on each loco really isn't important

 

9) A decent beer fridge in the loft really is a great asset, especially when friends drop by.

 

10) Railways, like so much else, are always better when built with friends, as one of my oldest co-conspirators and I reminisced on his 61st birthday a few days back.

 

One abiding memory for me of Waverley East will always be its ability to handle scale length trains, at scale speed, and despite the lack of scenery, I will enjoy watching these two videos..

 

 

 

As to the future? Well who knows? However, it would be a cold day in a very hot place if we were to move somewhere without space for a decent railway room, or maybe even a purpose built shed...

Edited by bigwordsmith
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Crikey Smithy, that's a bit of a kick in the guts (the latest health news).

 

Moving closer to family will be exciting tho' and even if there's no room for "the big layout" that you have been enjoying, a little 'un  can be just as much fun !

 

P.S. I love the Bimmer, at 50 I'm starting to think that I might be ready for a proper grown up's bike instead of the "back breaker" Japper and a BMW looks like it's a good option for Oz, something that is able to eat up those miles in relative comfort but still has an adequate reserve of Oomph!

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Last week locally there was an accident at a roundabout between a Bimmer and a JAP SUV Police and ambulance in attendants. Surprisingly bike on side rider talking to the boys in blue and the driver of the suv in the ambulance! . The bike had protection bars guarding the cylinders.

 

Keith

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I'm slowly working my way through the various threads on here and just stumbled onto this one. Firstly, I hope your move goes well and your health keeps to a manageable level, I'm waiting for some minor surgery and know all too well about the vagaries of potential long term health issues.

Modeling, along with some light gardening and fishing keeps me out of mischief. Keep well.

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Peter, so sorry to hear your news. I wish you all the very best for the future and hope to see maybe a scaled-down version of Waverley East in the future sometime? It'll be sad not to be able to pop by your thread and catch up on your latest developments with Waverley East, but you obviously have the right attitude to life, not to mention modelling, and I look forward to hearing of your future exploits as and when the opportunity arises.

 

With best wishes,
David

 

PS Don't forget the station area of Waverley West is only about a metre wide and 2 metres long, so lack of space is no obstacle!

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Go for it Smiffy. My attitude is all things are planned out and so what you are doing is going to be good. Get down to the sea and sun (I hear that the south east Devon Coast is Good and perhaps Weymouth and area is even better).

All the very best my friend and I look forward to seeing your new layout thread once things have moved on. 

 

Sincerely,

Phil

Edited by Mallard60022
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Crikey Smithy, that's a bit of a kick in the guts (the latest health news).

 

Moving closer to family will be exciting tho' and even if there's no room for "the big layout" that you have been enjoying, a little 'un  can be just as much fun !

 

P.S. I love the Bimmer, at 50 I'm starting to think that I might be ready for a proper grown up's bike instead of the "back breaker" Japper and a BMW looks like it's a good option for Oz, something that is able to eat up those miles in relative comfort but still has an adequate reserve of Oomph!

 

 

Thanks Mate, we always work on the basis that things will work out - yes the BM is a great mile muncher, although I have put on a better seat - Four hours in the saddle yesterday on an observed ride but OK when getting home - not bad for the fat bloke!

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Last week locally there was an accident at a roundabout between a Bimmer and a JAP SUV Police and ambulance in attendants. Surprisingly bike on side rider talking to the boys in blue and the driver of the suv in the ambulance! . The bike had protection bars guarding the cylinders.

 

Keith

 

I forked out for those after toppling my last one three times - mostly in slow speed stuff. They weren't much use when I got head-on'ed last year by a Polish truck driver on my side of the road, although the Halvarsoons gear and body armour played their part superbly!

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Peter, so sorry to hear your news. I wish you all the very best for the future and hope to see maybe a scaled-down version of Waverley East in the future sometime? It'll be sad not to be able to pop by your thread and catch up on your latest developments with Waverley East, but you obviously have the right attitude to life, not to mention modelling, and I look forward to hearing of your future exploits as and when the opportunity arises.

 

With best wishes,

David

 

PS Don't forget the station area of Waverley West is only about a metre wide and 2 metres long, so lack of space is no obstacle!

 

Thanks David - that's very kind. I must be honest WW was one of my inspirations, and I'm sure it will be revisited at some time. I'min the middle of lifting track and amazing how something that took weeks to lay, can be lifted in a couple of hours!

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Go for it Smiffy. My attitude is all things are planned out and so what you are doing is going to be good. Get down to the sea and sun (I hear that the south east Devon Coast is Good and perhaps Weymouth and area is even better).

All the very best my friend and I look forward to seeing your new layout thread once things have moved on. 

 

Sincerely,

Phil

 

Thanks Phil - your kindness and friendship are much appreciated. Have no fear, all will work out!

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I'm slowly working my way through the various threads on here and just stumbled onto this one. Firstly, I hope your move goes well and your health keeps to a manageable level, I'm waiting for some minor surgery and know all too well about the vagaries of potential long term health issues.

Modeling, along with some light gardening and fishing keeps me out of mischief. Keep well.

 

 

Many thanks for your kind thoughts - I plan to be around for a while, so as David says there will be updates - hopefully soon!

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Sorry to hear things are not quite as good but revel in the new challenges. No looking back its all forward to something that may even be better. Looking forward to seeing future updates and plans.

 

Keith

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Sorry to hear things are not quite as good but revel in the new challenges. No looking back its all forward to something that may even be better. Looking forward to seeing future updates and plans.

 

Keith

 

 

Thanks Keith - as you say it's all forward, just perhaps in a different direction!

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Hi Peter

 

I echo what has already been said by other members, so sorry to hear about your illness, I truly wish you and your family all the very best for the future.

 

I am also sorry to hear you have decided to call a halt on your layout as well but I do hope you continue to chat on the RM Website I have enjoyed our communications regarding both of our layouts.

 

Take care and as I have already said I really do wish you all the very best for the future.

 

Best Regards

 

David

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G'Day All

 

All the best on your move, I hope your health improves, even a little bit, I suffer from Emphysema, (smoked for 39 years) so I do know what it's like to do something trivial and then your gasping for breath, and you've only turned over in bed. !!

 

manna

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Hi Peter

 

I echo what has already been said by other members, so sorry to hear about your illness, I truly wish you and your family all the very best for the future.

 

I am also sorry to hear you have decided to call a halt on your layout as well but I do hope you continue to chat on the RM Website I have enjoyed our communications regarding both of our layouts.

 

Take care and as I have already said I really do wish you all the very best for the future.

 

Best Regards

 

David

 

 

Thanks David,

 

I'm not being carried off in a box quite yet, well hopefully, so I do expect to have at least one more layout in me!

 

The shed will survive, so that at least might actually et finished in the meantime, and I will of course keep active on the fora.

 

ATB

 

Peter

G'Day All

 

All the best on your move, I hope your health improves, even a little bit, I suffer from Emphysema, (smoked for 39 years) so I do know what it's like to do something trivial and then your gasping for breath, and you've only turned over in bed. !!

 

manna

 

Man I know that one from my time in the RBH - I really do feel for you, and thank you for your support

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SO even though we have only just put the house on the market, and haven't yet found a place to roost, my thoughts are already turning to what to do next!

 

Watching the comings and goings over at SOS junction, coupled with he rapidity with which Waverley East was dismantled due to its lack of ballast, scenery etc. made me realise that overambition in a model railway is not a good thing.

 

Our esteemed friend Gilbert ( Great Northern of this parish)  did mention this to me one one or two occasions, yet even after simplifying my design  and pulling back the number of popints/ sidings/ platforms, I would find myself staring at the beast I had created and wondering How I would ever get round to completing the wiring, let alone the ballasting and scenery.

 

So again working on the basis that I have to accept a potential future limit to my abilities and that in the meantime I plan to make as much of them as possible, I have started to think about not having a station, or schedules or any of that , but focusing back on the engine shed for the movements and shunting, and perhaps setting up a couple of loops with a fiddle yard.

 

This would allow me to run a procession of trains of reasonable length down the back of the shed - which will  have to be extended, onto the existing viaduct and then off scene  to loop around the other side of whatever room/ shed I sendup with

 

It would give me the fun of seeing long trains sweeping or trundling by, and could even be ripe for some clever automation.

 

post-10395-0-65647300-1510065656.jpg

 

As for finding a destination for locos, these  could be sent 'off site' and make their way round a return loop, allowing them to go away for a while and return after a notional days work, before  being turned, fortified and sent off again a while later.

 

Apart from the main line extension to pick up for each end of the existing viaduct, which has been retained along with the main shed,  this ideas has the other benefit of not needing any ballast or scenery, but I do suspect DCC may be involved!

 

 

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Good luck with the move and I hope health probs don't get to much in the way perhaps a move beside the sea would help a little ,like the idea for the new masterpiece  please keep posting with updates .regards Chris

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Good luck with the move and I hope health probs don't get to much in the way perhaps a move beside the sea would help a little ,like the idea for the new masterpiece  please keep posting with updates .regards Chris

 

 

Thanks Chris - we have our eye on one particular village  that is just slightly inland and hs good access to seaside walks as well as a road to the top of the South Downs way avoiding the hard climb to the summit!

 

It's also close to family and not too built up. The challenge is finding a house there as the oe we fancy went under offer - mind you lots of deals fail over these days so we're still positive!

 

Of course it would help if we sold our own house as well!

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I'm a bit taken aback by that.

 

I think all I can do is wish you good health and happy modelling.

 

Build something you'll enjoy.

 

Alan

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I'm a bit taken aback by that.

 

I think all I can do is wish you good health and happy modelling.

 

Build something you'll enjoy.

 

Alan

 

 

Thanks Alan - IT probably sounds worse than it is, although if I think about it, maybe it is as bad as it sounds, but I've found throughout the last 60+ years that taking an 'Oh well WTF' attitude tends to get me through.

 

As it happens I'm having aa very inspiring time at work interviewing entrants for a new awards scheme for the transport industry. Today, my daughter and granddaughter can around and I spent an interesting afternoon writing up interviews about interesting new innovations in transport, while the background music was supplied by CBeebies, keeping my eight month old granddaughter amused in the next room.

 

When life is as surreal as that, taking it too seriously is impossible!

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Right enough doom and gloom - I'm off to hospital tomorrow for the first of three massive steroid infusions followed by a three month course, which should ( hopefully) help to regain some of the lost lung function.

 

This added to the fact that we seem to be having less than zero interest from potential house buyers,means that the move may not happen quite so promptly after all. In fact SWMBO and I decided earlier today that if it doesn't happen by Easter, then we'll take the house off the market and look again in 2-3 years' time.

 

All of which makes me think, perhaps I reacted rather hastily in dismantling Waverley East, but then I was beginning to wonder how on earth I'd cope with such a massive layout one handed.

 

So as a compromise, it struck me that perhaps this design could be the answer...

 

post-10395-0-74291900-1512062511_thumb.jpg

 

The idea would be to build sectional baseboards, mounted on easily demountable trestles in 6' lengths so that if we do get a sale, it can be very easily dismounted and relocated.

 

The design allows for a fiddle yard with 5 roads in one direction and six in 't'other, each of which could hoid up to 16 carriages plus two locos. This would allow me to store 2 DMUs and a local, one long express, plus a DMU or a very chunky goods train in each loop. Potentially that would give me 20 different trains to pass by!

 

The idea is that they would literally pass by - so no station, or stopping, just a steady succession of main line traffic.

 

The shed will have an entry and exit road- each of which could hold heaven knows how many locos ( I have over 100) so you could send a loco off to do its duty, it meanders its way around the loop in a long line of locos, and eventually returns to the shed to be serviced stored etc. 

 

I'll need to find a way to automate all the movements outside the shed, so I'm beginning to think I may just have to bite the DCC bullet, especially if I decided to work a coal train in to replenish the coal tower!

 

The other thought is a possible extension to the shed - I have about 4' of dead space that could be filled, possibly a round house?

 

All thoughts welcome...

 

 

post-10395-0-32551800-1512062191_thumb.jpg

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Go for it Smiffy. All the very best with the Hostipple stuff. Spring is a better time to push the sale of the house. Winter is carp for selling, better for a decent Brandy or Malt and plenty of mince things.

Phil

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