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alant

Show us your scratchbuilt building

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Ah, so when is a scratchbuilt model not a scratchbuilt model. Scalescenes is one product that in my mind crosses over. All the design has been done for you, but you dont get a kit of parts, just templates to help guide you. So, is it a kit or is it a scratchbuild? I am doing everything a scratchbuilder would do other than researching/measuring and drawing the shapes on a peice of card/styrene. Everything after that is done in the same way. I add different windows, guttering, relief, roof tiles, weathering etc to customise it so its different, but is it still just a kit?

 

Scratchbuilders often use pre-manufactured parts to put on their models. I dont see many manufacturing their own card, foam-board, styrene sheet, mdf/Ply etc. Many use pre-made windows, chimney pots, doors, etc so again, its really an assembly of many parts, just sourced from different origins. The main difference being that a scratchbuilder is doing the research and design and transferring it onto the medium before cutting out and assembling them.

 

So, whats the diffrence with using advanced technology such as CAD/Laser cutters. If Brushtype4 designed, fabricated and made this protoype item, I think it qualifies. However, anyone else purchasing the kit and building it would in my mind be a kit builder.

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That weighbridge office is a beautiful model, that's for sure.

 

It illustrates the accuracy of computer-aided design and other modern technologies. There's no doubt that there are new skill sets required for these technologies.

 

I'd be happy to have a model building of that quality on my layout.

 

But, I have to say it, I'd be much, much happier if I had built it using slightly more 'raw' materials, such as sheets of plasticard, scribing my own bricks (OK, fair enough, I'll give in on that one, let's say using Slaters embossed bricks) and all done from a scale drawing.

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That weighbridge office is a beautiful model, that's for sure.

 

It illustrates the accuracy of computer-aided design and other modern technologies. There's no doubt that there are new skill sets required for these technologies.

 

I'd be happy to have a model building of that quality on my layout.

 

But, I have to say it, I'd be much, much happier if I had built it using slightly more 'raw' materials, such as sheets of plasticard, scribing my own bricks (OK, fair enough, I'll give in on that one, let's say using Slaters embossed bricks) and all done from a scale drawing.

 

Ah, but should you then be making your own plastic / card/  paper & ink, rather than relying on bought-in items...  Using embossed plasticard is just cutting corners.

Oh, and you'll need to grow your own weeds and moss, none of this using static grasses malarkey.

 

 

At the end of the day it's a fine model, which is exactly what this hobby is all about.

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Interesting divergence of definitions. How about the Ouse Valley Viaduct in 4mm by Re6/6 and 10800? Magnificent in scope and detail, but including multiple copies of parts commercially produced to their design. Is anyone really going to say this isn’t a scratchbuild?

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Lets take the superb layout Lime Street Station by Les Green. They design and have parts laser cut/etched/3-D printed, then assemble them into magnificent, superbly detailed models of real structures. Amazing modelling and the top skill level of the hobby. When you look at the model of the Hotel and the station canopy they built, who is going to tell them that their model doesnt qualify to be on this page as they are really just kit builders!

Edited by ianLMS

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Some of my post on this topic seem to have disappeared to I'd better tread carefully lest the authorities are watching.

 

Anyway, please look on the website linked to the original posting on this subject. There you will see a kit available to all and sundry at a price of £45. 

The photographs provided look remarkably like the original building, which is not surprising considering the kit is marketed as being of that original.

 

The kit manufacturer was not the person who built the kit.

 

The model is very beautiful and I would be very proud of it on my layout. However, can anyone justify a description other than a kit built model?   

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Some of my post on this topic seem to have disappeared to I'd better tread carefully lest the authorities are watching.

 

Anyway, please look on the website linked to the original posting on this subject. There you will see a kit available to all and sundry at a price of £45. 

The photographs provided look remarkably like the original building, which is not surprising considering the kit is marketed as being of that original.

 

The kit manufacturer was not the person who built the kit.

 

The model is very beautiful and I would be very proud of it on my layout. However, can anyone justify a description other than a kit built model?

 

If it's the prototype to a kit what's the problem. Anyway what's wrong with showing any well built building whether adapted from a kit, scratch built or a prototype for a kit.

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If it's the prototype to a kit what's the problem. Anyway what's wrong with showing any well built building whether adapted from a kit, scratch built or a prototype for a kit.

Read the title of the topic. That might give you a clue.

Edited by RBAGE

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Ah, but should you then be making your own plastic / card/  paper & ink, rather than relying on bought-in items...  Using embossed plasticard is just cutting corners.

Oh, and you'll need to grow your own weeds and moss, none of this using static grasses malarkey.

I'm sorry, I haven't got time to give this comment the response it deserves, as I'm off to somewhere in the Gulf to drill for my own oil, then going down the town planners to discuss the plans for the Kernow Refinery, so that I can then visit the architects next week to look at their latest plans for the Kernow Plastic Factory.

 

Got plenty of my own home-grown weeds and moss in the garden, mind.

 

At the end of the day it's a fine model, which is exactly what this hobby is all about.

On that point, I am prepared to confirm and not deny that you are entirely right, correct and not in error with the general tone and specific direction of that comment.

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I'm sorry, I haven't got time to give this comment the response it deserves, as I'm off to somewhere in the Gulf to drill for my own oil, then going down the town planners to discuss the plans for the Kernow Refinery, so that I can then visit the architects next week to look at their latest plans for the Kernow Plastic Factory.

 

Got plenty of my own home-grown weeds and moss in the garden, mind.

 

On that point, I am prepared to confirm and not deny that you are entirely right, correct and not in error with the general tone and specific direction of that comment.

At last, a brand of sanity I can identify with.

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I will just say this and with total respect for whatever means you go about your modelling, I have a friend, she cant build models for toffee, nor can she cut card or plastic and make a building.

What she can do is use a computer and produce any building in the world, she is not a scratch builder in my opinion but a kit design manufacturer. 

To add to that, any one who puts a kit together is a kit builder like folks that build kits, for themselves or professionally.

Pete A L.

Edited by Gravy Train
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Carrog station building in 7mm scale...

attachicon.gifWEB Station up 30C.jpg

 

Coachmann, you have bravely brought us back to the point of this thread. Thankyou. Your building challenged me to take a very close second look as it is convincing. 

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Carrog station building in 7mm scale...

attachicon.gifWEB Station up 30C.jpg

 

Wow! that looks fantastic. I'm just experimenting with laser cut stone for a LSWR based set of North Cornwell buildings.

 

post-1485-0-71329400-1535732961_thumb.jpeg

 

These are all bespoke one off's. 

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A semi-derilict barn made from business card, balsawood, vacuum formed corrugated sheeting and a lot of patience.....

 

post-8925-0-33884800-1535734429_thumb.jpg

 

 

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A couple of pictures of Biggleswade Weighbridge Office and weighbridge built and painted by David Illingworth from a laser kit that I designed and cutout.

 

attachicon.gifBW 32.jpg

 

attachicon.gifBW 25.jpg

 

The real building for comparison.

 

attachicon.gif34 Weighbridge.jpg

That's a damn fine replication my friend. Love the finish on those yellow bricks.

Top hole as they say.

Phil

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A scratch footy (or any other sport) team is made up of players that are not necessarily those that would normally play. Are we saying that we need to become The Creator to produce a scratch 'built' team?

S.K. Eleton

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A bit belated, as the layout they are on was retired from the exhibition circuit eighteen months ago, but here are my contributions.

 

post-730-0-06067300-1535897270_thumb.jpg

Based on the Goods shed at Sulby Glen, Manx Northern Railway.

 

 

 

post-730-0-36055700-1535897653.jpg

Based on a prototype near Llandewi Brefi.  If the place sounds vaguely familiar it's where Dafydd, the only gay in the village, lived in Little Britain.

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I suppose it's too much to hope you add a small round-faced man in some leather hot-pants and a PVC t-shirt ...                 

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A new commission I have recently finished - Gauge1 Goods Shed.

 

post-9443-0-85988900-1537121785_thumb.jpg

 

post-9443-0-77502400-1537121799_thumb.jpg

 

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And now for something completely different!   

 

If you are familiar with the Jacques Tati film 'Mon Oncle' you will recognise this house:

 

43074212540_11ec505243_c.jpg

 

It was just a film set, built in the square of a small French town and then taken down again afterwards. Our hero, Monsieur Hulot, lives in the top part on the left and can be seen unlocking his front door.

 

43074211240_70bb5034d9.jpg

 

This is what it looks like in 16mm scale (1/19th). The model is 600mm long and a maximum of 300mm wide and will stand against the wall. The limiting factor was the maximum height of 550mm, which means that the roof and chimneys have had to be truncated. 

 

31013237808_1736506444_c.jpg

 

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44835764782_4c31778b50_c.jpg

 

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31013247288_7ab41b4f20_c.jpg

 

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Now all I've got to do is get it to France where the owner lives!

Peter

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What a great subject for a model - and very nicely done.

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And now for something completely different!   

 

 

 

Now all I've got to do is get it to France where the owner lives!

 

Peter

 

Hopefully not on the car roof !!

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