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The diagram there shows tying to a ring; the next diagram shows tying to a cleat, neither illustrate the rosettes, which are the fittings in question. Those BR documents generally are invaluable - although dating from the 1950s/60s, I think one can take them as exemplifying best practice for at least the preceding half-century if not longer. If following the link, scroll right down the page to the end of the section headed "Freight Vehicles and OPeration". Credit to the Barrowmore Model Railway Group for making these generally available. 

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OK, I have a slightly different question about LB&SCR wagons. Specifically the Stroudley 8-ton vans.  A lot of them (but not all!) have two characteristic bulges on the bottom of the sides, just outboard of the doors. Does anyone know what they are? 

lbsc_box_14aug04_0014h.jpg
Image from https://www.bluebell-railway.co.uk/bluebell/pic2/wagons/lbsc_box.html

The bulges are on the bottom plank of the bodyside, just underneath the level of the bottom door hinges. There doesn't seem to be a hole in the woodwork behind, so are they door bangers, or what? I've not been able to find references to what they are anywhere...

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On 01/07/2020 at 02:39, Northroader said:

Just off the top of my head I’d suggest on the viaduct just west of Gloucester station? Certainly not Swindon.

After a while I found my way back to the photo on the internet and the caption on the website says its outside Swindon, I'm guessing on a bridge somewhere. That doesn't help me much as there's quiet a lot of railway in Swindon!

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46 minutes ago, Lacathedrale said:

What did engineering sidings look like in the pre-group era? Was it how we imagine them with bolster trucks, open wagons, ballast brakes, cranes, snowplows, etc. ?

 

Here's a small-scale installation: Ballast Pit Sidings, at Kings Heath on the Midland's Camp Hill line in Birmingham, c. 1890. Just a pair of sidings alongside the running lines and a handful of decrepit huts, with the ballast being extracted on site. Is that a crushing machine between the huts? Note the Engineer's Department wagons - dropside wagons, usually thought of as ballast wagons, but here apparently being used for other items, and the 6-wheel (pre-diagram) rail wagon - probably 24ft rails at this date.

 

Larger cranes - steam cranes in particular - would belong to the Locomotive Department, along with their attendant tool and mess vans, also snowploughs, and so would live at locomotive running sheds. The Engineer's Department would borrow such cranes for large jobs but would have smaller hand cranes of 5 ton or 10 ton capacity. Here's the match wagon for one, though lacking its jib rest.

 

 

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On 09/05/2020 at 22:14, Skinnylinny said:

OK, I have a slightly different question about LB&SCR wagons. Specifically the Stroudley 8-ton vans.  A lot of them (but not all!) have two characteristic bulges on the bottom of the sides, just outboard of the doors. Does anyone know what they are? 

Hello SL,

 

Thanks for the pic, I found a drawing of this on the GANSG site: https://www.igg.org.uk/gansg/00-app2/sr/lbsc.htm

 

The pic explains what the drawing doesn't, the bulges. I'll convert the drawing to a 7mm cardboard kit and make it my next van build.

 

Cheers and thanks again - Jim

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