Jump to content

Sasquatch

Lets see your teak coaches.

Recommended Posts

Don`t be shy and post up any repaints or finish on Gresley or Thompson stock. Any scale from Z to 1:1. 

It is a subject gone over many times and one which Hornby have gone great lengths to achieve.

No doubt some RMwebers are much more learned than I on the subject. 

To start off we have the Hornby version.

post-8964-0-19550200-1380926290_thumb.jpg

 

 

My age old Humbrol 143 and gloss tan plain teak on a Kirk kit. 

post-8964-0-31978400-1380926351_thumb.jpg

 

 

Prscision paints weathered teak paint on a Chivers pigeon.

post-8964-0-04773700-1380926521_thumb.jpg

 

Plain  wartime brown on a ply BG.

post-8964-0-72295400-1380926617_thumb.jpg

 

Hornbys Thompson fake teak paint finish.

post-8964-0-59692200-1380926694_thumb.jpg

 

And my effort on a mailcoach composite.

post-8964-0-78738000-1380926754_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple more from my stock gallery.

Plain brown again this time precision paints on 52' 6'' BG kirk kit

post-8964-0-87324000-1381002529_thumb.jpg

 

Weathered matchboard Thompson (can you tell I like my parcels trains) :D 

post-8964-0-64618700-1381002559_thumb.jpg

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

 

Thanks to Jonathan Weallans for prodding me in this direction, I've finally got around to a few snaps of my teak coaches.  In the past I modelled LNER lines in the 1930s, but more recently have changed direction to BR(E) of circa 1960.  However I dug a few LNER coaches out to pose with my Bachmann / Locomotion GN Atlantic, and thought I'd take a few pictures while I had them out.

 

First up, an ex-GNR 6-wheeled passenger brake van, built from drawings in the first edition of 'Historic Carriage Drawings' (Jenkinson/Campling).  It's coupled to an ex-GNR Covered Carriage Truck; the drawings for this were first published in 'Modeller's Backtrack', but I think have since been reproduced in the more recent version of 'Historic Carriage Drawings' (volume 3).

 

post-31-0-56296300-1428405971.jpg

 

Next, a corridor articulated twin.  I think these were among the first articulated coaches, converted from some of the earliest ECJS corridor coaches.  They seem to have been used in semi fasts from King's Cross in the 1930s (Outer Suburban in today's language), which is why I built them, using an Isinglass drawing I seem to recall.  The bogies are MJT, with the middle one slightly modified to accommodate the articulation.  The articulated bearing is as per the type used in the Ian Kirk kits, which itself is along the lines of the prototype.

 

post-31-0-21641600-1428406230.jpg

 

This clerestory gangwayed Passenger Brake was made from drawings in the 'Model Railway Constructor', which had a long running series of drawings of GN and ECJS coaches in the 1970s.

 

post-31-0-96069300-1428406444.jpg

 

This clerestory Corridor Third was from a drawing in 'Historic Carriage Drawings'; the original or one very like it is in the NRM:

 

post-31-0-19867300-1428406546.jpg

 

And lastly, an LNER Corridor Third, from an Ian Kirk kit.  I lined the upper panels with 10 thou Plastikard to reduce the heaviness of the panelling; the gangways are MJT (as are the gangways on the other coaches).

 

post-31-0-82263600-1428406703.jpg

 

Of the above, the most recently built were the ECJS twin and the LNER Corridor Third; although I've always followed the same basic process for painting 'teak' coaches, I'd like to the results got better as time went on!

 

 

 

 

  • Like 16

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I be cheeky and ask if I could buy some spare LNER transfers to finish my pigeon van please.A hmrs sheet would be wasted on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bachmann Thompson Full Brake and Third using Southern Pride sides for the Flying Scotsman versions.

 

post-7186-0-54575700-1428431106_thumb.jpg

 

post-7186-0-01195900-1428431124_thumb.jpg

 

 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are scratchbuilt, Steve? Is there one of these emoti-things for 'we are not worthy'?

 

Mine are all from kits:

 

d129_5.jpg

 

GNR D129 Luggage Composite (Bill Bedford)

 

milkvan_zpsd87e51a7.jpg

 

GNR D325 Milk Brake (Bill Bedford)

 

d183_4.jpg

 

GNR D183 Brake Composite (D & S)

 

d10c_1.jpg

 

d10c_2.jpg

 

LNER D10C Restaurant First (MJT)

 

d27a_7.jpg

 

LNER D27A Third Open (MJT)

 

d96_6.jpg

 

GNR D96 Brake First (RDEB)

 

ecjslc.jpg

 

ECJS Luggage Composite (Peter K)

 

fk_doors.jpg

 

LNER D 1 Corridor First (Ian Kirk)

 

100_6080.jpg

 

ECJS D34 Third (cut and shut from three Kirk kits)

 

 

ecjs_3_4.jpg

 

ECJS Third (conversion from a Kirk kit with Graeme King roof)

Edited by jwealleans
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steady on Jonathan!   :blush:

 

Perhaps should have mentioned earlier, yes apart from the Kirk LNER Corridor Third, they are scratch built from Plastikard.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are lovely Steve,  although a late comer to the scratch build in plasticard scene (and I have only done a couple of wagons) I can appreciate the work that has gone into making them look that good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are scratchbuilt, Steve?  Is there one of these emoti-things for 'we are not worthy'?

 

Mine are all from kits:

 

d129_5_zpsf50795c1.jpg

 

GNR D129 Luggage Composite (Bill Bedford)

 

milkvan_zpsd87e51a7.jpg

 

GNR D325 Milk Brake (Bill Bedford)

 

d183_4_zps0784a20b.jpg

 

GNR D183 Brake Composite (D & S)

 

d10c_1_zpsc23b4b28.jpg

 

d10c_2_zps1a34c09c.jpg

 

LNER D10C Restaurant First (MJT)

 

d27a_7_zps1bc6ec21.jpg

 

LNER D27A Third Open (MJT)

 

d96_6_zpsfe560654.jpg

 

GNR D96 Brake First (RDEB)

 

ecjslc_zps5e06bfe6.jpg

 

ECJS Luggage Composite (Peter K)

 

fk_doors_zpsdd827958.jpg

 

LNER D 1 Corridor First (Ian Kirk)

 

100_6080_zpsd29cb5ad.jpg

 

ECJS D34 Third (cut and shut from three Kirk kits)

 

 

ecjs_3_4_zps68b64d8e.jpg

 

ECJS Third (conversion from a Kirk kit with Graeme King roof)

Nice coaches, Jonathan!  I had in mind to make some of the 'long' clerestories but never got around to it.  Ingenious to use Kirk kit sides to make them - if I'd thought of that I might have got around to building some myself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I have to hold my hand up and say that that last coach isn't all my own work.  I bought it on Ebay and it turned out to be from Andy Rush, but the carriage had been started by Nigel Hunt.  Sadly, of course, Andy never saw it completed but it was Graeme King's cast clerestory roofs which made it possible.  I'd had several goes prior to that but never got the roof looking satisfactory.  As it is it's an exercise in trompe l'oeil.

Edited by jwealleans

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

 

Thanks to Jonathan Weallans for prodding me in this direction, I've finally got around to a few snaps of my teak coaches.  In the past I modelled LNER lines in the 1930s, but more recently have changed direction to BR(E) of circa 1960.  However I dug a few LNER coaches out to pose with my Bachmann / Locomotion GN Atlantic, and thought I'd take a few pictures while I had them out.

 

First up, an ex-GNR 6-wheeled passenger brake van, built from drawings in the first edition of 'Historic Carriage Drawings' (Jenkinson/Campling).  It's coupled to an ex-GNR Covered Carriage Truck; the drawings for this were first published in 'Modeller's Backtrack', but I think have since been reproduced in the more recent version of 'Historic Carriage Drawings' (volume 3).

 

attachicon.gifP1010190.jpg

 

Next, a corridor articulated twin.  I think these were among the first articulated coaches, converted from some of the earliest ECJS corridor coaches.  They seem to have been used in semi fasts from King's Cross in the 1930s (Outer Suburban in today's language), which is why I built them, using an Isinglass drawing I seem to recall.  The bogies are MJT, with the middle one slightly modified to accommodate the articulation.  The articulated bearing is as per the type used in the Ian Kirk kits, which itself is along the lines of the prototype.

 

attachicon.gifP1010191.jpg

 

This clerestory gangwayed Passenger Brake was made from drawings in the 'Model Railway Constructor', which had a long running series of drawings of GN and ECJS coaches in the 1970s.

 

attachicon.gifP1010193.jpg

 

This clerestory Corridor Third was from a drawing in 'Historic Carriage Drawings'; the original or one very like it is in the NRM:

 

attachicon.gifP1010194.jpg

 

And lastly, an LNER Corridor Third, from an Ian Kirk kit.  I lined the upper panels with 10 thou Plastikard to reduce the heaviness of the panelling; the gangways are MJT (as are the gangways on the other coaches).

 

attachicon.gifP1010195.jpg

 

Of the above, the most recently built were the ECJS twin and the LNER Corridor Third; although I've always followed the same basic process for painting 'teak' coaches, I'd like to the results got better as time went on!

These GNR coaches look good. I am interested in the construction of the gangwayed passenger brake in picture p1010193.

 

I have Issinglass drawings as I am constructing the Kings Cross brake down crane train of the 1950's which used a the full brake painted black. I intend to use a forthcoming Bill Bedford kit for the chassis and roof, GRKing clerestory and ends but seek more advice on how you went about building the body, the panelling and the sliding doors.

 

Cheers

Paul 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul,

 

Thanks for asking; I'll try and remember what I did!  I went about constructing all the scratch built coaches in a similar way.  I was inspired by the writings of the late David Jenkinson, and also the methods of construction of the old PC Models kits (which had sides printed on clear plastic).

 

The body sides are cut from 20 thou Plastikard, laminated on the back to two layers of 40 thou which cover the length of the vehicle below window level; the innermost of these laminations ends 1mm above the bottom of the sides - this gives a rebate for a floor of 40 thou to fit into.  After the laminations had set hard, I profiled the sides using a scraper tool (meant for wallpaper scraping, I think), to take the bulk off then finishing with fine sandpaper, checking against the drawing at intervals - it's easy to take too much off!

 

The panelling was then built up using 5 thou Plasikard.  A continuous panel of this runs the length of the coach below window level, with the lower panelling built up on this, again from 5 thou cut into strips 0.5mm wide.  The upper panelling is then added, above the 5 thou lower panel, again using 5 thou Plastikard cut into 1mm wide (I think!) strip.  The picture of the clerestory passenger brake shows this better than I can explain!  Droplight frames are cut out of 10 thou.

 

There is a false ceiling at the top of the sides made from two layers of 20 thou Plastikard laminated - the lower lamination fits between the sides, and the upper lamination rests on top of the sides with its edges representing the gutter at cant rail level.  The roof itself is from 10 thou which I 'cooked' over a wooden former in an electric oven!  I kept looking at it until the Plastikard had melted enough to drop over the former, when I smoothed it down by hand wearing gloves and left it to set, then trimmed to fit.  I've got formers for the basic GN profile (which also suits the main roof of clerestory coaches) and for domed ended 'Gresley' style roofs.  Not sure I'd really recommend doing the roofs that way today though; commercially available roofs would be much better.  The clerestorys were then built up on top of the main roofs; first painting the insides black. I think the clerestory tops were from 40 thou sanded to a curved profile, but on both vehicles I feel the ends of the clerestory roofs could be more domed than they actually are.

 

Interior partitions and corridor sides were cut out from 20 thou.  To keep everything square these are cut with vertical sides to fit between the coach sides, with the bottoms of the partitions cut out to fit the lower side laminations, and the width of the tops of the partitions being the same as the false ceiling.  The height of the partitions being 1.5mm less that the height of the sides, to allow for the thickness of the floor and false ceiling.  This works OK for coaches like this where the sides are vertical above waist height, but wouldn't work so well for coaches with a continuous tumblehome.  Although the passenger brakes don't necessarily have internal partitions in reality, I think I added some where they wouldn't be visible to keep everything square and rigid.

 

Solebars were from 40 thou, and step boards from 20 thou - I tended to use black Plastikard for these as the paint on them is prone to damage.

 

Bogies are from a variety of sources - I think the clerestory brake has plastic Ian Kirk bogies, the clerestory third has McGowan white metal ones and the twin has MJT white metal sides mounted on their brass bogie compensation units.  Buffers, ventilators etc. are metal fittings from various sources - MJT (from Dart Castings) would probably be one of the sources for these parts today.  The gangways on the clerestory brake and the twin set are also from MJT.  I usually made door handles from filed down brass pins and grab handles etc. from brass wire, although again etched / turned fittings are available these days for these parts.

 

I think that covers most of it; hope this helps,

Cheers,

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to reanimate a dead thread. but I've just finished modifying some Hornby Railroad coaches - two of which were finished din weathered teak. 

 

post-8963-0-24071200-1466515258_thumb.jpg

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice Sylvian, what technique did you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here Tom. 

 

The only modifications to the technique I made was to use Pledge with klear as I could find Humbrol Clear for love nor money and Railmatch Roof Dirt & Frame Dirt (10:1 ratio in favour of roof dirt) instead of the black washes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice, that's the technique I intend to use as well.

 

Good to see that it works for others too. I'll need to master it, as will have a large amount of stock to paint in Teak.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a few of the ex LNER coaches I painted and grained for a previous layout (Greenfield) as I saw them in the very early 1950's....

 

post-6680-0-44407200-1466521989.jpg

post-6680-0-95123200-1466521990.jpg

post-6680-0-13658700-1466521992.jpg

post-6680-0-66568300-1466521993.jpg

post-6680-0-84235900-1466521994.jpg

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice indeed (of course!) Larry.

 

I don't suppose you could explain or point me in the direction of the technique that you used? I'm interested to see different methods of achieving a realistic teak finish, as it's something I'll need to master!

 

Thank you for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't suppose you could explain or point me in the direction of the technique that you used? I'm interested to see different methods of achieving a realistic teak finish, as it's something I'll need to master!

 

 

The first move was to spray the coach bodies an overall sand/tan colour. Fellow painter Dave Studely gave me the clues. He sent me a brush that he had specially prepared and instruction to buy Humbrol gloss tan and dark brown (sorry I cannot remember their numbers). I painted a few panels with the tan using a normal brush then I worked in the grain on wet paint using dark brown and the brush Dave had circumcised. It looks messy and is, but the gloss paint eventually settles out smooth. Then I painted the vertical and horizontal raised beading mid to dark brown........It is merely me replicating the state of the beading after some time in traffic. After that, insignia and satin varnish...

 

post-6680-0-52500400-1466530658_thumb.jpg

post-6680-0-00339500-1466530660.jpg

post-6680-0-05781500-1466530661.jpg

post-6680-0-06414900-1466530662.jpg

Edited by coachmann
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you very much - added to my list of techniques to try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not LNER, not Gresley or Thompson, but does this count?

 

My first (and only) attempt at a varnished teak effect, on a Roxey LCDR Grand Vitesse luggage van. I haven't put any transfers on yet but I am quite please with the effect, all done with a brush. The grain, which doesn't show well in this slightly blurry photo, is streaked on with a dry-brushing technique.

LCDRLuggageVanTeakFinish-3cropped_zps859

Edited by SRman
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here Tom. 

 

The only modifications to the technique I made was to use Pledge with klear as I could find Humbrol Clear for love nor money and Railmatch Roof Dirt & Frame Dirt (10:1 ratio in favour of roof dirt) instead of the black washes. 

Klear is no longer on the market.  PLEDGE  MULTI-URFACE WAX".is the same thing.sainsburys sell  it £3.50   for a lifetimes supply

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.