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That's a challenge, particularly at this early hour.

Assuming you haven't moved the wheels on the axles, (and you obviously have the driven axle in the right place at the rear) then it doesn't matter which way round the axles are.

The loco is "right hand lead". At least, mine is, and as this was common practice on the GW and other railways, I expect they are made that way, and I'm confident they're all the same.

Imagine standing in the cab, with the loco going forwards. If the loco were see-through, you would see the right hand rods coming up to top-dead-centre, and then they would be moving forward until they got to front dead centre. If you were to stop the loco instantly, and get off, the crankpins on the right hand side would all be as far forward as they can be - at "3 o'clock". If you walk around to the left hand side of the loco, the crankpins should (all) be at top-dead-centre, 12 o'clock.

If they are not, then you have a quartering issue, with one (or more) axle(s).

It is easy to be confused by the quartering, but easy to make an aide-memoire. Take a piece of paper, write "right" at the bottom, use a felt tip pen so it shows through the paper, draw a circle and put an "X" or something at 3 o'clock. Turn it over sideways, write "left" at the bottom, and draw the same circle, and put an "X" at 12 o'clock. This is what it should be. Now, if you had put the axle in the wrong way round, so left is right and vice-versa, you need to turn you piece of paper until the left X is at 3 o'clock. Now turn your paper over sideways, and you will find the other X is at midnight. It doesn't matter which way round the axles are!

Now, there is a proviso: it doesn't matter which way round they are, if they are all quartered at exactly 90 degrees. If the axles are all quartered at exactly 88 degrees, you won't be able to put the rods on unless they are all the right way round, but the loco will run perfectly when you do get them on.

Possibly the easiest thing to do is to drive the loco until the motored axle right hand crankpin is at 45 degrees, between 12 and 3 o'clock, and then line up the other axles and put the right rod on, temporarily. You should be easily able to see whether all the crankpin holes on the left hand side are lined up or not. If not, only one of the can be wrong (there are three, two must be the same!) so reverse that one. The rods should now fit.

(I'm not sure if the rear axle drive gear is offset - if it is, then this axle must be "correct" and you may have to reverse both the other axles)

If not, I fear you have moved the quartering.

Hoping for a happy outcome

Simon

Simon,

 

Thank you this is really helpful - now to find a bit of time this weekend to work through this.

 

Many thanks

 

Andrew

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  • 6 months later...
  • RMweb Gold

Are Ixion Fowlers becoming the "New Lima". ?

Two lovely scratchbuilt locos on Ixion chassis

http://www.gauge0guildarchive.com/xenforo/index.php?threads/wisbech-and-upwell-tramway.268/

Best

Simon

Having finally remembered my username and password for the Guild forum, I can safely say that wow! They are seriously impressive and very nice looking. Now I just need to find an Ixion chassis and suitable plans for a Tramway 04...

 

Many thanks for sharing Simon - greatly appreciated!

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Having finally remembered my username and password for the Guild forum, I can safely say that wow! They are seriously impressive and very nice looking. Now I just need to find an Ixion chassis and suitable plans for a Tramway 04...

 

Many thanks for sharing Simon - greatly appreciated!

Hi there,

Here are the two W&U locos I've been building over the winter, (almost finished!) both are on the Ixion Fowler chassis acquired from a certain online auction site (acmodels regularly auctions them).

I used a 4mm drawing enlarged by Monty Wells which appeared in the Model Railway Journal No.3, Autumn 1985 for the Drewry, an old Skinley for the J70 with a suitable degree of scepticism (the bell was in the wrong place I believe).

Hope you find them helpful.

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Hi there,

Here are the two W&U locos I've been building over the winter, (almost finished!) both are on the Ixion Fowler chassis acquired from a certain online auction site (acmodels regularly auctions them).

I used a 4mm drawing enlarged by Monty Wells which appeared in the Model Railway Journal No.3, Autumn 1985 for the Drewry, an old Skinley for the J70 with a suitable degree of scepticism (the bell was in the wrong place I believe).

Hope you find them helpful.

post-27704-0-32230100-1492444479_thumb.jpg

post-27704-0-23013400-1492444552_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Additional lining on the GWR Fowler

 

I received the Fowler after its body modifications (after David L. O. Smith, see post 22nd March) had been completed by Mike Morris. The first thing I did was to look at the photos in Russell to find the extent of the prototype lining. The model comes with the main panels on the cab sides, engine housing and sloping top of the gear box housing lined in GWR style panels. There is also lining on the ends of the buffer beams but in white rather than GWR orange. There is no other lining. Additionally, the valance and footsteps are in green rather than the black one would expect.

 

A thorough examination of the photos in Russell showed that the front of the cab was lined in a rather extravagant way, far more elaborate than standard GWR styles. Also, each louvre on the engine and gearbox housing was lined, presumably with a black edge and offset orange line. The starter engine’s louvres were not lined but the transverse transmission housing was, on its narrow top and side. I have never seen a photo of the back but it is a reasonable assumption that the rear of the cab would have been lined in a style similar to the front.

 

I could not see any evidence that there was lining on the red part of buffer beams or housings but, curiously, there was lining behind the buffer beams and on the main frames. There was also lining around the wheel centres and there appeared to be lining on the spokes.

 

The ex-works photo in Russell seems to have been taken using panchromatic film which renders red as white so the buffer housings appear white, as do the rods. A close examination shows that the bosses of the rods are not painted. It also shows that the blocking to the cab side lettering is not a uniform red but red fading to pink, and black.

 

My first job after taking off the rods was to put them in the vice and file the tops smooth to get rid of the untidy mould marks. I also filed the front to smooth out the plating (they appear to be nickel plated brass). The bosses of the rods were masked off and the remainder sprayed with a red oxide etching primer. Once cured (24 hr) I airbrushed on three coats of Humbrol 174. Red is a difficult colour to spray as it is so translucent when thinned. I sprayed the three coats at roughly ten minute intervals, allowing the thinners to evaporate before continuing. Once dry I chemically blackened the bosses to reduce the bright finish.

 

The next job was to brush paint the valances, steps and buffer beam ends black. After a day’s curing, I could line the buffer beam ends on one side, then, after a further day, the second side. To do the extra lining on the superstructure I needed to remove it from the footplate unit but, as Mike had already been through the process, this was easily done. All the lining on the superstructure - front and back of cab, louvres and starter transmission housing - was done with bow pen compasses, offsetting from an adjacent edge. The same method was used on the frames, wheels and back of buffer beams. Rounded corners were done with a fine brush.

 

The final task before reassembly was to mask off the windows then airbrush a satin varnish on the front and back of the cab just to tone down the gloss lining. 

post-30161-0-29653600-1495483195_thumb.jpg

post-30161-0-83592400-1495483216_thumb.jpg

post-30161-0-12820300-1495483234_thumb.jpg

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Excellent, Ian ... rather shows up my example, now!  Thank you for taking the time to share this with us.

 

I cannot remember now if I decided to omit the lining on the wheels or if I just didn't notice it at the time, and you make a good point about the lining on the rear cab sheet and other places.  When I have nothing else to do, my loco might have to come back to the paint shop for the additions but I would worry about not matching up the lining as well as you did.

 

I also cleaned up the moulding marks on the rods, although I forgot to mention that, and I painted and finished them in essentially the same way.

 

"... body modifications (after David L. O. Smith, see post 22nd March)"

 

For anybody who might be interested to know what these were, I have them written up on my website at: (www.davidlosmith.co.uk/GWR_Fowler.htm) which might be more convenient.

 

David

GWR-No1_3-4RHS.jpg

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  • 8 months later...

Mine was £140 delivered from Ebay. Just done the 2 day Ebor Group exhibition and it was easily the most used loco, operated perfectly. I have always worried about the limited pickup an 0-4-0 would have, but no problem at all. And a number of comments when visitors recognised it was similar to Churchill at the DVLR. [and no one commented on all the work I had done on the wagon kits......]

 

Paul

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  • 6 months later...

Yes, it's the 7mm I'm talking about. My sound fitting feature will be a stand alone piece, unconnected with anything else you may have already read. It will probably also show the alternative speakers and locations I tried out before settling on....the one I settled on. Ha ha.

 

Paul

 

Hi Paul,

 

PM sent.

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  • 2 years later...

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