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jonny777

Prototype for everything corner.

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3 hours ago, russ p said:

 

60mph where line speed is under 90 and 75mph above 90. 

I was actually traction inspector on it assessing the driver

 

So how many coaches would you need to allow normal line speeds with 3 x Class 37s? I was on such a railtour years ago and we weren't limited to 60 or 75.

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2 hours ago, bimble said:

Was looking through my photos for something else when I spotted this... three different fonts and four different sizes... doesn't mean you can't number your shed! (Tilehurst 2014)

 

14014099271_7b7f115c9f_c.jpg

 

 

 

Gee-wizz. That overgrown mess is Tilehurst...!

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Want to model an MPD but don't like the idea that you can't see all those lovely locos you bought?

 

Bradford Hammerton Street has the solution!

 

Photo from facebook

FB_IMG_1578914010550.jpg

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There were a number of similar "sheds" after the war - so you can probably find one for most regions !

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Only got four coal hoppers and want to run a Speedlink? No worries. [I suspect there's too many examples of these types of workings. RIP wagonload]

 

From Flickr:

 

Claggy Class 47 On The Speedlink Coal (Michael McNicholas)

47237 erupts through Hebden Bridge station on the morning of 8th September 1987 at the head of 6M27 08:11 Healey Mills to Preston Deepdale Speedlink coal. [Pic Michael McNicholas]

 

Claggy Class 47 On The Speedlink Coal (Michael McNicholas)

 

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Typical! The answer's of course. This one turns up. What's interesting is that the 37 only appears to have half an orange cantrail stripe. Maybe it was needed in hurry?

 

So...

 

'Want to run your BR blue 37 with an orange cantrail stripe on one side only'

 

37222 passes Hebden Bridge with 6E80 11:00 Preston Deepdale to Healey Mills Speedlink Coal empties. 24/2/88.

 

One Blue Tractor And Three HEAs (Michael McNicholas)

 

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8 hours ago, Aire Head said:

Want to model an MPD but don't like the idea that you can't see all those lovely locos you bought?

 

Bradford Hammerton Street has the solution!

 

Photo from facebook

FB_IMG_1578914010550.jpg

 

Present-day Union Pacific version of that:

 

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/721962/

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1 hour ago, pH said:

 

Present-day Union Pacific version of that:

 

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/721962/

Not quite

The UP locos are "surplus" units in a former open freight yard, the UK scene is a former covered depot with service locos where the roof has been removed due to war bomb damage.

 

This is more akin to the UP "dump", Swindon GWR in the early 1890s:

broad-gauge-dump-swindon-1892-413687.jpg

Surplus 7' 0" gauge locos waiting scrapping (or conversion to standard gauge in a few cases)

Edited by melmerby
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And testing the new bridge on the approach to Glasgow Central in 1902 (or 1904 - I've seen both dates in captions of this photo):

 

https://www.lner.info/forums/download/file.php?id=10927&sid=7ce49c39fb57395360690587fb1a2f70&mode=view

 

Most of the engines here seem to be in steam, in contrast to those on the Sydney bridge.

Edited by pH
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Aye , and well polished pH, look at those condensing pipes.  Class 92 s, and it looks like all 22 of them are in that pic. 

 

Well, perhaps not all 22, but I reckon at least a dozen. Nice black liveries too. Glorious stuff. 

 

I must build another..... 

 

 

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35 minutes ago, pH said:

Most of the engines here seem to be in steam, in contrast to those on the Sydney bridge.

 

Most of the 96 locos used for SHB load testing were in storage due to a downturn in traffic during the Great Depression. Notice most of them don't have tenders! IIRC only 4 were in steam to move the others around.

 

Cheers

David

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I actually think the Hammerton Street photo isn't due to wartime bomb damage but actually from when the shed was being converted from Steam to useage for storing DMUs

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On 02/01/2020 at 13:19, The Stationmaster said:

What on earth the '15' has to do with the order on any particular day I really don't know - you simply used the next available number in the series but in practice they tended to be all over the place especially for freight numbers.  But yes it does suggest it is a published train path rather than a special but it could well be that the O was used to clarify the destination Region on a special.

 

 

But then we get to the interesting bit because it is not carrying Class 9 lamps but is lamped as a Light Engine/light engines coupled together etc.  And it is probably fair to surmise that the wagons are most likely there to spread the loading instead of having the two engines coupled to each other and they might also, as already suggested, be adding some brake force as well.   Being coupled light engines there is no need for a Guard or side lamps, but there should be (is?) a Rider on the rear engine (it would be fully manned if it is in steam but I suspect that it isn't).

 

So in summary - it is carrying a Class 9 headcode but probably only to identify the path it is running in as it is lamped Class 0.  My own view is that it is heading for Eastleigh Works having run, for whatever reason, onto the SR in the London area

 

Surely train sequence numbering only has a hope of working on local confined routes - not a hope on a cross country route such as Bristol to Derby where many traffic flows would converge and diverge.

 

There was a previous thread here on foreign locos overhauled at Eastleigh

although it could be argued that 9fs were not foreign as Eastleigh had an allocation to work the Fawley - Bomford Bridge oil trains via the DN&S. Those trains went over to BRCW type 3s in 1963 however.  92116 was never an Eastleigh loco however - IIRC they were ex WR locos with BR1G tenders, inset coal bunker. According to https://railuk.info/steam/getscrap.php?id=54 no 9fs were scrapped at Eastliegh but whatever is going on the loco crew seem to be enjoying themselves!

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This was wartime bomb damage though:

t.jpg.560e8f0eb9fb7c24c70896e2ac529d75.jpg

Brunswick shed (Liverpool) on my layout. We took this to an exhibition in Bremen, when the locals asked why there was no roof on the engine shed we answered "Luftwaffe", hoping they would laugh.......they did, who says Germans don't have a sense of humour

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9 hours ago, DavidB-AU said:

 

..........  IIRC only 4 were in steam to move the others around.

You must be older than I thought !

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21 hours ago, brushman47544 said:

 

So how many coaches would you need to allow normal line speeds with 3 x Class 37s? I was on such a railtour years ago and we weren't limited to 60 or 75.


This is why I keep a copy of the relevant rule page to hand! 

 

i’d say they should have been limited to 75mph as per the first block of speeds (ie 3 locos and any number of coaches) as the 2nd table doesn’t mention 3 locos as being allowed at the higher speeds with longer takes 

 

F1C4C90F-82C3-415B-83A3-819928E1C1B8.png.e9ea09158931c850c784c24bb3255ade.png
 

the PLP IM trains I sometimes drive are normally top and tail 37 with 4 coaches so they come under the bottom table

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4 hours ago, big jim said:


This is why I keep a copy of the relevant rule page to hand! 

 

i’d say they should have been limited to 75mph as per the first block of speeds (ie 3 locos and any number of coaches) as the 2nd table doesn’t mention 3 locos as being allowed at the higher speeds with longer takes 

 

F1C4C90F-82C3-415B-83A3-819928E1C1B8.png.e9ea09158931c850c784c24bb3255ade.png
 

the PLP IM trains I sometimes drive are normally top and tail 37 with 4 coaches so they come under the bottom table

 

In Scotland any move with more than two locos coupled together has to be specially authorised. For short notice moves Control issue a notice which is passed to the relevant TOC/FOC and on to the Driver, and also to the controlling Signallers. This is because there are speed restrictions over various structures, even on main lines such as the WCML, and some routes where more than two locos are banned altogether; An example being Holytown Central Jc to Wishaw Jc (due to the Calder Viaduct), requiring a train booked via that route with 3 locos or more to divert via Motherwell (of course, occasionally things have gone wrong and a 3 loco move has gone that way, requiring a structural examination of the viaduct afterwards !).

 

However, AFAIK, Scotland is the only route that issues such notices, presumably elsewhere the onus is on the Driver to be aware of any restrictions in the Sectional Appendix which apply to their train ? The Signallers would surely still have to be advised as well, for routing and regulating reasons ?

 

 

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8 minutes ago, caradoc said:

 

In Scotland any move with more than two locos coupled together has to be specially authorised. For short notice moves Control issue a notice which is passed to the relevant TOC/FOC and on to the Driver, and also to the controlling Signallers. This is because there are speed restrictions over various structures, even on main lines such as the WCML, and some routes where more than two locos are banned altogether; An example being Holytown Central Jc to Wishaw Jc (due to the Calder Viaduct), requiring a train booked via that route with 3 locos or more to divert via Motherwell (of course, occasionally things have gone wrong and a 3 loco move has gone that way, requiring a structural examination of the viaduct afterwards !).

 

However, AFAIK, Scotland is the only route that issues such notices, presumably elsewhere the onus is on the Driver to be aware of any restrictions in the Sectional Appendix which apply to their train ? The Signallers would surely still have to be advised as well, for routing and regulating reasons ?

 

 

Hi Caradoc,

 

I guess that structural examination is to prevent what happens the viaduct shewn at 1:38 in the following video ?

 

 

 

Gibbo.

 

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3 hours ago, caradoc said:

This is because there are speed restrictions over various structures, even on main lines such as the WCML, and some routes where more than two locos are banned altogether

 

Caradoc, is my memory correct that Duchesses could not be piloted over the bridge into Glasgow Central? (Despite the photo that I linked to above!) I seem to remember that any engine piloting a Duchess on a down train was removed alongside Polmadie shed.

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1 hour ago, pH said:

 

Caradoc, is my memory correct that Duchesses could not be piloted over the bridge into Glasgow Central? (Despite the photo that I linked to above!) I seem to remember that any engine piloting a Duchess on a down train was removed alongside Polmadie shed.

 

Sorry pH, I can't answer that; Somewhat before my time. My only recollection of restrictions into Central is from diesel days, when Classes 40, 44/5/6 were banned due to the risk of derailment with their long bogies. One day Carlisle sent a Peak down on on the morning Carlisle-Glasgow via the G&SW, and a loco change was made at Barrhead !

 

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What happens during bridge testing isn't necessarily to normal traffic rules.

 

Like this image from Warwickshire Railways:

gwrwm1592.jpg

 

And this:

gwrs1567.jpg

 

Two pairs of GWR Kings running side by side to test bridge deflections on the newly 4 tracked line south of Birmingham.

 

(A King was not allowed to pilot a King in normal traffic)

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15 minutes ago, caradoc said:

 

Sorry pH, I can't answer that; Somewhat before my time. My only recollection of restrictions into Central is from diesel days, when Classes 40, 44/5/6 were banned due to the risk of derailment with their long bogies. One day Carlisle sent a Peak down on on the morning Carlisle-Glasgow via the G&SW, and a loco change was made at Barrhead !

 


Wasn’t the ban from around 1979? I remember watching Peaks leaving and arriving in Carlisle via the G&SW as late as 1977-78. They worked into Glasgow Central for years, e.g. on the Thames-Clyde Express so I wonder what changed infrastructure-wise to cause the derailments and the resultant ban.

Edited by brushman47544

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The ban was quite late in the lives of the affected classes so wasn't really a major issue. I can only assume an actual derailment had occurred !

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