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leopardml2341

Midland Railway Fencing; Spec and Drawing Required Please

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Hello Folks.

 

Can anyone help with this?

 

Reason being I'm struggling with the local planning authority who want me to erect a fence to demark a boundary to a Midland Railway built building. They seem to think a generic 'heritage style' railing would be best.

 

If I can show them an authenticated spec for the original diagonal wooden fencing - wouldn't this be visually more appealing as well as historically accurate?

 

Any pointers to where I might obtain or (even better) a copy of a drawing or spec would be greatly appreciated.

 

Tried t'interweb, but maybe I can't get the search terms right, as I don't get anything useful.

 

Thanks in advance.

Andy

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The Midland used six types of fence: Sawn Diagonal Fence, Close Boarded Fence, Sawn Paled Fence, Post and Five-rail Fence, Wrought Paled Fence and Unclimbable Iron Fence.

 

No one is more authentic than the other.

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Midland Record no. 18 has drawings of Midland fencing, taken from the NRM Worthington collection.  Worthington was the Midland's chief engineer so the information should be official!  I would expect the drawings would be available from the NRM.

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There are a couple of fencing drawings within the HMRS service, but no preview to see what you might be getting.

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If you PM me mpst of the drawings are in the long out of print Midland Style.   From my own experience of researching this the Midland used the different styles in different circumstances.  The sawn diagonal was usually only at the rar of platforms.  Boundary fencing was usually of the post and rails type.  However send me a PM and I can gove you details.

 

 

Jamie

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If you PM me mpst of the drawings are in the long out of print Midland Style.   From my own experience of researching this the Midland used the different styles in different circumstances.  The sawn diagonal was usually only at the rar of platforms.  Boundary fencing was usually of the post and rails type.  However send me a PM and I can gove you details.

 

 

Jamie

Hello Jamie,

 

Thanks. You have (or will soon have) a PM.

 

Andy

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There is a fragment left of the diagnal style at the side of a bridge in Chesterfield and there was some near the Clay Cross station masters house until recently there may still be some in the hedge around the garden.

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There is a fragment left of the diagnal style at the side of a bridge in Chesterfield and there was some near the Clay Cross station masters house until recently there may still be some in the hedge around the garden.

Thanks, although I'm really looking for documented details, so that I can convince the local planning department of the provenance of my proposals.

Rgds,

Andy

 

There are a couple of fencing drawings within the HMRS service, but no preview to see what you might be getting.

Thanks Nick, already seen that and shared the same concern.

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The Midland used six types of fence: Sawn Diagonal Fence, Close Boarded Fence, Sawn Paled Fence, Post and Five-rail Fence, Wrought Paled Fence and Unclimbable Iron Fence.

 

No one is more authentic than the other.

But any of which would be better than a generic heritage styleee ?

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It was just if you wanted the diagnal design round your house there were other places it was used not just platform backs.

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It was just if you wanted the diagnal design round your house there were other places it was used not just platform backs.

 

Ah, I see. Thanks.

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