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Looks great, the photos show the amount of space you've got to play with and I don't think you want to put any more travk on otherwise it will look too crowded.

The addition of a private siding in front of the fiddle yard will add some interest, is it possible to make that drop down grade away from the station?

As for comments about the industrial loco hanging round waiting for the empty wagons, the thread on Bersham Colliery has an operating sequence where they do: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/71150-bersham-colliery-sidings-an-ideal-subject-for-a-model/

Cheers,

Andrew

Thanks Andrew. I think I shall leave the plan as it stands. If run something off the headshunt I will probably run it down a gradient.

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Chris

 

the loco's lovely.  You mention that you have three point compensation using the two front axles, so I suspect a rocking beam.  What did you do with the truck, which I suspect would have been radial on the real thing - indeed as it appears on your model?  Is it actually a well disguised pony truck, or is there some other means of suspension/control employed?

 

best

SD

The front driving axles use simple rocking beam compensation. The radial axle is a cunningly designed pony truck for which the credit must go to Dragon Models.

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I'm in the USA visiting our new-born grandson who is also our first grandchild. He is off to a sound start in life with a green Ixion Hudswell Clarke; next item on the list for him is a cricket bat. Meanwhile, I am enjoying the good exchange rate and post-Christmas sales over here. Tortoise point motors for just over £10 a go and a big craft shop chain is doing a 40% discount so I think a new Iwata airbrush is on the way.

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I'm in the USA visiting our new-born grandson who is also our first grandchild. He is off to a sound start in life with a green Ixion Hudswell Clarke; next item on the list for him is a cricket bat. Meanwhile, I am enjoying the good exchange rate and post-Christmas sales over here. Tortoise point motors for just over £10 a go and a big craft shop chain is doing a 40% discount so I think a new Iwata airbrush is on the way.

 

Can you get Ixion loco's cheap in the USA Chris?

 

Ed

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I'm in the USA visiting our new-born grandson who is also our first grandchild. He is off to a sound start in life with a green Ixion Hudswell Clarke; next item on the list for him is a cricket bat. Meanwhile, I am enjoying the good exchange rate and post-Christmas sales over here. Tortoise point motors for just over £10 a go and a big craft shop chain is doing a 40% discount so I think a new Iwata airbrush is on the way.

Modelling a decent Welsh valleys line is fantastic, and I'm sorry I've only just picked up on this thread

 

However, because of the subject content, I strongly suggest you delete cricket bat and insert rugby ball! :jester:

 

Regards

 

R

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Modelling a decent Welsh valleys line is fantastic, and I'm sorry I've only just picked up on this thread

 

However, because of the subject content, I strongly suggest you delete cricket bat and insert rugby ball! :jester:

 

Regards

 

R

Bat for summer, ball for winter.

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As for comments about the industrial loco hanging round waiting for the empty wagons, the thread on Bersham Colliery has an operating sequence where they do: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/71150-bersham-colliery-sidings-an-ideal-subject-for-a-model/

 

Cheers,

Andrew

 

The loco at Bersham did not "hang around" waiting for empty wagons.  As the thread on Bersham describes, it merely moved out of the way during its normal shunting operations - which were immediately adjacent to the main line - to allow the BR loco to back the empty wagons into the yard.  

Edited by PGH

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Perhaps the answer to the 'shunting puzzle' is to have the NCB/colliery loco 'plated'. That is, it's allowed to work the station limits within the model, and it can't go beyond the starter/advanced starter/shunt limit (delete as appropriate). Usually a cabside plate which showed the loco in question was registered with British Transport Commission.

 

Don't know of this happened with passenger lines, but certainly happened on industrial sidings.

 

"Colliery locomotives are not allowed beyond this point" is/was a common sign.

 

Ian

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Looks great, the photos show the amount of space you've got to play with and I don't think you want to put any more travk on otherwise it will look too crowded.

The addition of a private siding in front of the fiddle yard will add some interest, is it possible to make that drop down grade away from the station?

As for comments about the industrial loco hanging round waiting for the empty wagons, the thread on Bersham Colliery has an operating sequence where they do: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/71150-bersham-colliery-sidings-an-ideal-subject-for-a-model/

Cheers,

Andrew

The Bersham colliery link is excellent and great inspiration for the BR Blue era too.

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What is the origin of the signal box Chris?  Self-build?  That is a lovely view of the Hudswell pushing a few rough minerals uphill behind the box, I can't wait to see it with the scenic dressing!

Edited by Osgood

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What is the origin of the signal box Chris?  Self-build?  That is a lovely view of the Hudswell pushing a few rough minerals uphill behind the box, I can't wait to see it with the scenic dressing!

The signal box is scratch-built. I'll post some more photos and construction notes when I return from holiday.

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Well I returned from the USA today and as promised, here are some photos of Cwm Bach's signal box.

 

The box is built to the GWR’s standard design of 1890 fitted with the later five-pane windows. The size of the box with five windows along the front is based on the example that stood at the up end of the main passenger platform at Calne station in Wiltshire. Features from the slightly larger box at Pewsey on the GWR’s Berks and Wilts main line were also included. The box at Abergwnfi station, the inspiration for CwmBach, is also the 1890 design, but platform mounted.

 

The walls were built from plain white 40 thou plasticard. Window and door apertures were cut out before the side and end walls were cut from the sheet. The planking on the gables was also scribed before cutting out the walls. When measuring up remember that when building gable-roofed structures, the side walls should fit inside the end walls. The waste from the main windows and doors was cut diagonally and used as reinforcing gussets in the corners to ensure they were strong and square. The floor is also 40 thou plasticard. The basic carcass was left overnight to set hard.

 

Holes were drilled in the walls of the locking room to allow solvent adhesive to be flowed into the areas that could not be reached by capillary action from the edges of the shell. Brick embossed plasticard was cut to fit each wall, again sides inside ends. I used Slater’s embossed English Bond plasticard, but Flemish Bond appears to have been more commonly used by the GWR. Around the base a sill the height of 11 courses of bricks was cut from 40 thou plasticard, mitred along the top edge and glued in position before being covered with brick plasticard. A strip of brick headers one course high was cut from the brick plasticard and glued at an angle along the top of the sill. Now is the time to cut a section out of the bottom edge of the front wall for the clearance of point rodding and signal wires. Photographs of prototype boxes indicate that this aperture was as much as six courses high

 

With the walls assembled, it was time to start on the roof. The signal box has a detailed interior as the large windows in 7mm scale expose the cabin’s emptiness. Interior illumination meant that the roof would have to be removable for maintenance. The roof was cut from 40 thou plasticard. Five reinforcing gussets cut to the same angles as the gables were glued to one half of the roof. The gussets at each end should be a tight fit inside the gables, but take care not to glue them to the gables. Check that all is square and allow to set. Repeat with the other half of the roof and fix small strips of waste plasticard to the inside of the ridge. Cut and fit barge boards to the ends of the roof. If you have been careful with your marking, cutting and assembly the basic roof should sit squarely and firmly atop the walls with the gables neatly sandwiched between the gussets and bargeboards. Measure and cut two lengths of plasticard strip to form the soffits and glue in position between the bargeboards. Again, take care not to allow the solvent to weld the soffits to the walls. Allow the roof sub-assembly to set.

 

The slates were formed from strips of white 80 gramme paper. A grid of rectangles was drawn on my computer and printed. The slates were then cut into strips, the individual slates partially cut through and then stuck to the roof from the bottom up.  This task is tedious, but the final appearance repays patience and care and, in my opinion, looks much better than strips of usually much thicker embossed plasticard. The ridge tiles were made from 10 thou plasticard and the roll along the ridge tiles was made from polystyrene rod. The ventilator and finials were white metal castings that I picked up in a bargain box at a local exhibition some years ago. The stove pipe was made from polystyrene tube. Gutters were made from polystyrene tube sliced down the middle, which is easier said than done and forget any ideas about getting two gutters from the same piece of tube. In future, I think I wil use filed down brass tube, though Evergreen produces polystrene semi-circular rods that may agood alternative.

 

The raised wood panelling around the upper storey doors and windows was fashioned from plasticard strip. I then painted the walls before fitting the windows. The interior walls of the cabin were painted light grey and the external woodwork was painted with a faded cream colour. The raised panelling was painted chocolate.

 

The roof was painted a suitable grey colour and the bargeboards and gutters brown. The ventilator and stove-pipe were painted a light grey. Light grey paint was then carefully dry-brushed down from the ridge to simulate streaks of rainwater staining. The ventilator and stove-pipe were dry-brushed with a rust colour.

 

Windows are the eyes of the model so to speak and in 7mm scale extra effort is required to achieve a convincing result. As this was a standard GWR design I used a set of Churchward Models etched brass window frames sold as a separate item at a show. The windows and door were cut from the fret and cleaned up before being sprayed with white paint. Glazing was cut from transparent 15 thou plastiglaze. The frames were then placed face down and the glazing attached using Zap glue applied carefully and sparingly with a cocktail stick. I considered using a spray adhesive, but had doubts about the longevity of such glue. The locking room door was a piece of scribed plasticard. Door knobs are Peco track pins, but I may turn replacements from brass rod.

 

The staircase and landing were scratchbuilt from plasticard sheet and strip. The critical dimension is the width of the steps, which were cut from a strip of 15 thou plasticard. The risers are 20 thou. Assemble the risers and steps first and leave to set before fitting the banisters and brackets.

 

Interior details are the rather expensive Springside signal box castings. Fitting them is little more than several tedious sessions of fettling and painting the castings. Springside provides good instructions about installation and colour schemes, but I also scoured my library for pictures of the interiors of GWR signal boxes.  When I have finalised the signalling and track arrangements or Cwm Bach, I will consult the signalling gurus on RMWeb  for a view on the correct colours for the the levers. More work is required to give an authentic, lived-in appearance though this will not be overdone as signal boxes were usually kept immaculately clean and tidy by their staff. Internal lighting was fitted by running a grain-of-wheat build through the stove-pipe, which was a piece of plasticard tubing. Another bulb was put in the stove to represent the glow of the fire. Wires were run to a strip of copper-clad sleeper stuck to an inside wall of the locking room.

 

And so to the finishing touches. Drainpipes were made from 1.6mm brass rod.  Thin fuse wire was wrapped around the pipe and the ends twisted to form spigots. A tiny amount of solder fixed the wire to the pipes and hardened the spigots. Small plates of plasticard strip were fixed to the walls and when set, drilled to receive the wire spigots of the drainpipe. The fire buckets are Springside and were hung from brackets bent up from 0.45mm wire.  The lamp over the landing was made from a Ratio 4mm scale station lamp suspended with from 0.45mm bras wire. The coal bunker was made from 20 thou plasticard. I added talcum powder to the grey paint to create the impression of cast concrete. The nameplate is etched nickel-silver and was produced to order by Guilplates. It’s a bit of an extravagance at £12, but in this large scale a flat, printed plate is unconvincing.

 

This week I will start to lift the 4mm scale Boduan Junction layout. I may take some valedictory photos before the demolition team goes in.

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What a lovely model, and thanks for such a detailed description of the build.  I particularly like the weathered staining on the brickwork.  Even a kettle - mine's milk no sugar please!

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Very nice Chris although just about everything on the block shelf is actually superfluous for Cwm Bach alas  :angel: 

 

Tell me more.

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I do like that 'box, Chris, but as Mike has said, the block shelf is not quite right for Cwm Bach.

 

Without stepping on Mikes toes, there would probably be only a single bell, which is linked to the staff machine. However, there would be signal lamp 'light out' indicators, for the advanced starter & outer home. In addition, there might be a telephone for the outer home, for rule 55.

 

Below the shelf, the board would possibly be adorned with indicators and plungers, etc.

 

However, modelling rule number 1 will always apply, and I'm sure the signalmen at Cwm Bach will will have some seedlings trays on the right hand side of the shelf. "Gettin' the runner beans ready, see..."

 

Just needs a cloth over a lever handle. Someone's got to keep those handles clean...

 

Ian

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Very nice signal box Chris, though as others have said, maybe a thinning out of the block instruments to suit the location. Also, I think you might have too many distant signal levers, but that's just being picky.

 

I like the suggestion about seed trays, if you're modeling during the summer months, how about some tomato plants too? Hartlebury box I think it was, always used to have a good selection each year until they closed the box :-)

 

Cheers,

Andrew

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Very nice signal box Chris, though as others have said, maybe a thinning out of the block instruments to suit the location. Also, I think you might have too many distant signal levers, but that's just being picky.

 

I like the suggestion about seed trays, if you're modeling during the summer months, how about some tomato plants too? Hartlebury box I think it was, always used to have a good selection each year until they closed the box :-)

 

Cheers,

Andrew

 

Andrew,

Thanks for the suggestions. At the time of construction I didn't give much thought to the interior- in fact none at all to the disposition of the levers and instruments so have ended up with something that is not very convincing.

 

I think I am going to go for a winter scene with a couple of stunted, bare, wind-carved trees, yellowish grass and puddles on the platform and in the goods yard in order to capture the gloom and dampness of the Valleys. This is not out of disrespect - I love the area - but more a reflection of the meteorological reality.

 

Chris

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Hi Chris,

 

The signal box looks fantastic - it's amazing how much more detail there is in 7mm compared to 4mm, and obviously there is a requirement to scratch build so many more of the buildings. I'll be following this thread with interest as the railway develops, and I would certainly like to see some final pictures of Boduan Jct before and during its lift from the current garage location!

 

Adam

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Hi Chris,

 

The signal box looks fantastic - it's amazing how much more detail there is in 7mm compared to 4mm, and obviously there is a requirement to scratch build so many more of the buildings. I'll be following this thread with interest as the railway develops, and I would certainly like to see some final pictures of Boduan Jct before and during its lift from the current garage location!

 

Adam

 

Adam,

I have just posted an obituary of Boduan Junction on RMWeb here: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/81357-rip-boduan-junction/

 

Regards,

 

Chris

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Tell me more.

Paul has and there's no need to add to it as he has been accurate in his specification.  Nothing of course to stop you 'adding' an Advanced Starter should you be so inclined but i would think an Outer Home (technically the Home Signal under GWR/WR nomenclature) would be unnecessary unless you happen to have a steep rising gradient approaching Cwm Bach.

 

Incidentally the block shelf should be painted black, not brown, if my experience is any guide.

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Paul has and there's no need to add to it as he has been accurate in his specification.  Nothing of course to stop you 'adding' an Advanced Starter should you be so inclined but i would think an Outer Home (technically the Home Signal under GWR/WR nomenclature) would be unnecessary unless you happen to have a steep rising gradient approaching Cwm Bach.

 

Incidentally the block shelf should be painted black, not brown, if my experience is any guide.

Hi

 

All the WR boxes I have worked in the block shelves have been polished wood hence I would have said brown was correct, also polished floors, I know of one Signalman who kept a selection of different sized slippers by the door of his box and any visitors were asked to take their shoes off and use the slippers before coming in to the box.

 

Ian

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Hi

 

All the WR boxes I have worked in the block shelves have been polished wood hence I would have said brown was correct, also polished floors, I know of one Signalman who kept a selection of different sized slippers by the door of his box and any visitors were asked to take their shoes off and use the slippers before coming in to the box.

 

Ian

 

Every working signal box on the real railway I have visited has been immaculately clean, tidy and gleaming. 

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