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Network Rail orders Robel maintenance vehicles

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Is it just me or does the TSU bear a resemblance to an HST power car?

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Hi,

 

Having looked at the video, it certainly seems like a brilliant piece of kit, it will substantially reduced the risk to track workers and make it far more comfortable to work on track.

 

I can't wait until I can work within one!

 

Simon

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Sounds very interesting and must improve work conditions. Bit puzzled by the phrase "All maintenance and repair work on track and switches is carried out in the 68m-long MMU" - surely that one section's not 68 metres long? I could believe 68 feet....

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Sounds very interesting and must improve work conditions. Bit puzzled by the phrase "All maintenance and repair work on track and switches is carried out in the 68m-long MMU" - surely that one section's not 68 metres long? I could believe 68 feet....

Hi,

 

It probably means the unit as a whole and refers to not just the work, but transport of materials and people etc. Seen as it's a German Manufacturer, they probably wouldn't use feet, but I could be wrong!

 

Simon

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Hi,

 

Having looked at the video, it certainly seems like a brilliant piece of kit, it will substantially reduced the risk to track workers and make it far more comfortable to work on track.

 

I can't wait until I can work within one!

 

Simon

 Yes but will it work on 2ft gauge with Peco sleepers . . . . . . :no:

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Brilliant bit of kit. Will allow maintenance with the adjacent line still open at full line speed. Should cut down on route closures. 

Now I want a model. DCC with moving walls, folding steps, working crane &c. &c. Hmmm, need to find some tiny motors.

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This could prove to be interesting. Where to park it? where to load it if your depot has no connection to the network? If you park it elsewhere, how do you get the components and people to it? Who is going to drive it from where you park it to where it's needed? Can we take a possession around the train? Probably. I wonder if it is possible to do a thermit weld inside one? I hope we get one in Wales route, but I doubt that will happen.

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This could prove to be interesting. Where to park it? where to load it if your depot has no connection to the network? If you park it elsewhere, how do you get the components and people to it? Who is going to drive it from where you park it to where it's needed? Can we take a possession around the train? Probably. I wonder if it is possible to do a thermit weld inside one? I hope we get one in Wales route, but I doubt that will happen.

Hi,

 

It has an internal crane, so you can load it from a siding, train maintenance depot or possibly at an access point, you don't need a direct depot connection.

 

I suspect it'll be driven by the same drivers that drive the NR Test trains, although there might be a separate contract for it.

 

Why would you want to take a possession around one? These are designed to be used for maintenance on lines adjacent to main running lines, to protect workers, if the lines around it are under possession, then there is no need to protect the workers using this train

 

The promotional video shows a thermite welding taking place in the side the train, so seems like it's possible.

 

 

Simon

Edited by St. Simon

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This could prove to be interesting. Where to park it? where to load it if your depot has no connection to the network? If you park it elsewhere, how do you get the components and people to it? Who is going to drive it from where you park it to where it's needed? Can we take a possession around the train? Probably. I wonder if it is possible to do a thermit weld inside one? I hope we get one in Wales route, but I doubt that will happen.

The South East MMT will be based out of Paddock Wood and Horsham, the initial thinking seems to be having dedicated MMT gangs/welders working all over the region attached to the train. You can load at either of those locations, if you road in the material.

 

We're working on how we are going to work ours, whether it will be treated and planned as an engineering train or on track machine. Colas provide the drivers/operators. No reason why we can't take possession around like anything else. Even been talk of working as an engineers train required to stop in section, using only signal protection to protect it. How that plays out is anyone's guess.

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Hi,

 

It has an internal crane, so you can load it from a siding, train maintenance depot or possibly at an access point, you don't need a direct depot connection.

 

I suspect it'll be driven by the same drivers that drive the NR Test trains, although there might be a separate contract for it.

 

Why would you want to take a possession around one? These are designed to be used for maintenance on lines adjacent to main running lines, to protect workers, if the lines around it are under possession, then there is no need to protect the workers using this train

 

The promotional video shows a thermite welding taking place in the side the train, so seems like it's possible.

 

 

Simon

The internal crane is very useful, but the point I'm making is that if you have to load the machine at an access point because your depot doesn't have rail access, that means that the items that were delivered by road to your depot will need to be transhipped to the access point and then placed within reach of the crane on the machine. If you are talking about lengths of rail, then you have to have a pretty large access point and a decent piece of kit to get the items within reach of the crane....... 

 

With regard to taking a possession around one, I'm referring to the process of driving the train on an open railway with all the people and kit on board, stopping at a controlled signal that has been set to red, and then taking a possession of the railway that includes the train. This process saves a lot of time because you don't have to hand the train over from the signaller to the PICOP.

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If the sides open outwards (as shown in the film linked by Newbryford) I can't see how it can work with the adjacent line open to traffic as it's going to be well out-of-gauge.  Seems like it's going to require some 'interesting' operating procedures and Instructions.

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If the sides open outwards (as shown in the film linked by Newbryford) I can't see how it can work with the adjacent line open to traffic as it's going to be well out-of-gauge.  Seems like it's going to require some 'interesting' operating procedures and Instructions.

Adjacent Line Open rules will apply, so one side won't be able to be extended, but at least it will keep the workers in q place of safety and still probably give enough space to get to the six foot rail and fixings

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The Darlington based set has just arrived in the last couple of days. Work to accommodate it has been going on for the last few months mainly for access to the down sidings at Park Lane.

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With regard to taking a possession around one, I'm referring to the process of driving the train on an open railway with all the people and kit on board, stopping at a controlled signal that has been set to red, and then taking a possession of the railway that includes the train. This process saves a lot of time because you don't have to hand the train over from the signaller to the PICOP.

 

Ah right, I see, fair enough!

 

Simon

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The South East MMT will be based out of Paddock Wood and Horsham, the initial thinking seems to be having dedicated MMT gangs/welders working all over the region attached to the train. You can load at either of those locations, if you road in the material.

 

We're working on how we are going to work ours, whether it will be treated and planned as an engineering train or on track machine. Colas provide the drivers/operators. No reason why we can't take possession around like anything else. Even been talk of working as an engineers train required to stop in section, using only signal protection to protect it. How that plays out is anyone's guess.

 

Be interesting to see how this piece of kit will work in practise with the third rail in situ.  Presumably local isolations of the supply.  

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Certainly looks good, wonder if there will be a follow on order for more...

Also wonder what is next to be be brought/tried out

Keith

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wonder why the front end was changed from the one that had the steps and platform at the front.   I prefer the version with the steps I think.  Might be on the ever growing list to model.

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Britain’s first ‘workshop on wheels’ set to revolutionise railway maintenance

 

http://www.networkrailmediacentre.co.uk/news/britains-first-workshop-on-wheels-set-to-revolutionise-railway-maintenance

 

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The first of a new fleet of engineering trains which will revolutionise the way Network Rail’s ‘orange army’ carries out railway maintenance and repair work enters service this week.

 

The state-of-the-art mobile maintenance trains (MMTs) will make working on the railway quicker, safer and more efficient as well as less disruptive for passengers and freight. Based at locations around the country, the eight MMTs will provide a ‘workshop on wheels’ for engineers and track workers as they carry out repairs, renewals and upgrades to Britain’s 20,000-mile rail network.

 


Each train will have a workshop, two built-in 2t cranes to move heavy equipment, multiple power points (400V, 110V, hydraulic and pneumatic) and will be able carry all the tools and supplies the engineers could need, alongside a welfare area with kitchen and toilet. But the MMT’s key feature is the large, extendable work area that allows access to the track below, provides cover, floodlighting and – crucially – protection from passing trains.

 

As a result, the MMTs will reduce the amount of disruption engineering work usually causes as they may be able to work on a section of track without having to close the railway next to it. This will limit disruption during the day when engineers carry out repairs, while allowing better use of the railway at night for freight trains carrying everything from high street goods and mail, to cars for export and coal for power stations.

 

 

Neal Lawson, Network Rail’s maintenance director, said: “Many tasks on the railway can only be carried out when the railway is closed to traffic – but with passenger numbers growing and demand for freight increasing at record levels, the need to keep the railway open round-the-clock is greater than ever before.

 

“These new trains mean our frontline staff can complete a wide range of maintenance and repairs more quickly and efficiently, reducing the need for costly and disruptive closures of the tracks. They’ll also keep our people safe, warm and dry and better able to focus on getting the job done.”

 

 

Teams will be able to board the MMT at a depot and be taken directly to the work site. In the safety of the work unit they can make repairs on a section of track or, using a slow ‘creep’ mode, are able to make rolling repairs. There are shutter blinds fitted in the upper section of the work unit, allowing natural light and ventilation in good weather. Closing these offers shelter and protection in bad conditions. The work unit also has adjustable side walls so the workspace can be increased where possible.

 

Corey White, an MMT supervisor based in Darlington, will be among the first of Network Rail’s frontline staff to benefit from the new trains. “I’m lucky that I enjoy the job I do, but it can involve working in really tough conditons, a long way from shelter and simple comforts like a hot drink or a proper loo,” said Corey.  

 

“These new trains will make a massive difference to my team. We can get on the train at the depot with all the kit we need for a job and head straight to site. My favourite feature is the all-round lighting, which means we get pretty much perfect working conditions whatever the weather or time of day.”

 

 

The MMTs have been manufactured by renowned railway construction and engineering experts Robel, in Freilassing, Germany and will be delivered to Network Rail over the next 12 months. The first one to arrive will be based in Darlington, with the second (based at Paddock Wood in Kent) arriving in October and the third (based at Derby) in December. The remaining five will be stationed at Woking, Retford, Romford, Peterborough and Horsham.

 

The fleet will be operated and maintained by Colas Rail under a three-year deal.

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They forgot to mention the extending legs that allow it to stand up and let express trains pass underneath it before sitting back down to continue work.

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The MMT’s key feature is the large, extendable work area that allows access to the track below, provides cover, floodlighting and – crucially – protection from passing trains.

 

That seems like a rather clever idea, especially with trains passing which don't have holding tanks. Yuk.

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The first one to arrive will be based in Darlington, with the second (based at Paddock Wood in Kent) arriving in October and the third (based at Derby) in December. The remaining five will be stationed at Woking, Retford, Romford, Peterborough and Horsham.

 

That's the south and midlands taken care of. But I guess the rails in the north, Scotland, Wales and the west don't need repairing so much. (less use :P )

 

But then we all know that maintenance crews in those areas are made of stronger stuff and can endure the more challenging conditions.

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