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John.

I must say that looks fantastic, and an excellent recreation of your intended scene. The 9F is even better than I realised from previous photos and is one of the best 4 mm scale locos I've ever seen. Have you done some additional weathering since we last saw it?

Fro the prototype photo, the roof ladder up the slope looks somewhat darker than the model and there is the partially burnt out smoke vent (presumably from and internal soot fire), which would make an interesting feature.

Lovely workmanship in all aspects.

Dave.

Edited by Dave Holt
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Thanks for your kind comments Dave. I haven't done any more weathering on the 9F although I did do a bit of touching up on the paintwork as Gerry wanted some pics for MRJ. It could be that it's been so foul here today that I used additional hand held lighting for the shot to pick up the detail, but it has meant that the shed roof generally has come out lighter than it really is. I did think about modelling some of the smoke vents burnt out but not for very long!

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I bet he's glad that he's finished loading that lot. Time to knock off for the day and go for a pint or three.

 

1497564128_LoadingGrampus.jpg.eaff554e9474a12c94af4c8c1f33174a.jpg

Edited by Killybegs
text correction
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John,

A very well posed, convincing scene.

What is the basis of the pile of "stuff" behind the shed labourer? (Have I spelled that right? Spellcheck wants to remove the "u".) Is there a base layer to create the contour or is it a solid pile of granules? I ask because I need to create some piles of ash or ballast on Delph and wonder what the best method is.

Dave.

Edited by Dave Holt

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I glued a small piece of expanded polystyrene, approximately the right shape, to the baseboard then later carved it a bit more when it was set. This was then coated in a layer of PVA and covered with a thin layer of Evostik Fast Smooth Filler (I get through quite a lot of this, it is easy to work and very light). That was sanded smooth when dry then painted grey. This was followed by an application of my ash/clinker mix on another coat of PVA.

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A very realistic scene there John. Beautifully done.

 

A subject for the 'How realistic ..'thread.

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5 minutes ago, Re6/6 said:

A very realistic scene there John. Beautifully done.

 

A subject for the 'How realistic ..'thread.

 

Thanks, duly posted therein!

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John, what underlay do you use? I've only ever been able to find hanging basket liner nowadays. Not a patch on the old fashioned hairy stuff.

 

I did have a lifetime's supply in a wheely-bin until the bin men took it away one day!

 

Will you be adding static grass to it?

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2 hours ago, Re6/6 said:

John, what underlay do you use? I've only ever been able to find hanging basket liner nowadays. Not a patch on the old fashioned hairy stuff.

 

I did have a lifetime's supply in a wheely-bin until the bin men took it away one day!

 

Will you be adding static grass to it?

 

The current lot came from a friend who had no further use for it so I don't know its provenance. My previous supply came from old underlay that I rescued when someone was having their carpet replaced. It was pretty disgusting and needed a lot of washing in the bath. It was also reinforced with some sort of nylon which had to be teased out. I have also had to ditch some because it had too much artificial fibre in it. When I did Clinkerford many years ago, I used the sound deadening quilt that you could buy from places like Halfords. The downside was that it came with a rubberised backing which had to be torn off. It was, however, very good quality. I think cars come ready sound proofed these days.

 

I won't be using static grass (of which I seem to have accumulated substantial quantities) instead I will use some of the many scatter materials in my possession. I went through a phase of buying stuff every time I went to a show because I thought the colours looked better than what I had at home. It must have been the lighting that fooled me!

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Evening,

At last I have got round to reading through your thread. I have to say you have created a most excellent model. I am impressed with all aspects. I find the general construction and weathering techniques to be of the highest quality and inspirational.

Regards

Duncan

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John,

Compared with the prototype shed view, your rough grass appears much longer/more bushy. Will you be trimming the strand length before adding the scatter materials?

Dave.

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14 hours ago, Dave Holt said:

John,

Compared with the prototype shed view, your rough grass appears much longer/more bushy. Will you be trimming the strand length before adding the scatter materials?

Dave.

 

It will be further trimmed once it has received a bit of colour.

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4 hours ago, Killybegs said:

 

It will be further trimmed once it has received a bit of colour.

 

Ooooh goody, a trimmed bush.

 

Mike.

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John,

That looks to have captured it just right. Just needs a 9F to complete the scene.

Dave.

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Looks fantastic John!

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My sentiments, exactly.

In the second shot, in the lower centre of the photo, there appears to be a bricked-up canal bridge. Is the idea that the area occupied by the loco shed was originally a canal basin? It's a very plausible proposition.

Dave.

Edited by Dave Holt
Spelling mistake

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8 minutes ago, Dave Holt said:

My sentiments, exactly.

In the second shot, in the lower centre of the photo, there appears to be a bricked-up canal bridge. Is the idea that the area occupied by the loco shed was originally a canal basin? It's a very plausible proposition.

Dave.

 

Absolutely right Dave. When the GWR first bought the site and filled in the canal basin, they did so for a small goods yard, basically a set of sidings. This accounts for the large pair of gates. The line also served the warehouses, at the other end of the layout, that had previously been served by the canal. As traffic in the area increased, a larger yard was built elsewhere and the loco shed built on the site.

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Hi John,

 

Execellent work as always. I do like the two freight trains rumbling along.

 

kind regards,

 

Nick.

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