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davidw

Hornby K1

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As Hornby tend to work from the engineering drawings rather than scanning existing examples (I know that's changed with the Radial, etc.), some of this differences could be down modifications carried out on 'Shed' and not officially recorded. 

That's why I try to work form photographs as much as possible. My plans are to model 62045 & 62027 as running in the early to mid 1960's. Fortunately for me, I have rear end phots of 45 and 27. Both has the same detail as shown in post #369. I also have two phots of unidentified K1s at Stella Gill and Thirsk Town that also are the same. All the phots are taken after the tenders were modified with the rear division plate moved forward and arc raised.

Also checking a few pics of 4200 g tenders fitted to V2's and they have the ribs.

 

Thats not me being critical of Hornbys tender btw because as ever Rule 1 applies.

 

P

Edited by Porcy Mane

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The caption accompanying the photo might be a bit of a giveaway as to the location.....

 

My wife tells me that my looking skills are in need of improvement. I looked only at the photograph, not the caption or link. Now do I tell her about this?

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That's why I try to work form photographs as much as possible. My plans are to model 62045 & 62027 as running in the early to mid 1960's. Fortunately for me, I have rear end phots of 45 and 27. Both has the same detail as shown in post #369. I also have two phots of unidentified K1s at Stella Gill and Thirsk Town that also are the same. All the phots are taken after the tenders were modified with the rear division plate moved forward and arc raised.

Also checking a few pics of 4200 g tenders fitted to V2's and they have the ribs.

 

Thats not me being critical of Hornbys tender btw because as ever Rule 1 applies.

 

P

 

Nothing wrong with that  :jester:

Though it does concern me that the ruler you were using to check the straightness of the running plate, maybe out of calibration after having an argument with a guillotine  :onthequiet:

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Looking at the K1s allocations in the 1960s, I notice that a few were moved to Frodingham in 1960. I have seen a photo of one on a coal train at Gainsborough, but I am perplexed as to why Frodingham would need these locos when the shed had ample WDs and RODs for the heavy trains worked to/from there.

 

Does anyone know how the 36C K1s were employed on a regular basis?

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Nothing wrong with that  :jester:

Though it does concern me that the ruler you were using to check the straightness of the running plate, maybe out of calibration after having an argument with a guillotine  :onthequiet:

That's no ruler. It's a gasket scraper but it was within spec the last time I calibrated it. Note to self: "Line ruler up with background lines to avoid confusion"

 

P ;)

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I am intrigued by the photo of the Tender coal space by Porky Mane. What appears to be a passageway, but obviously isnt, must be there to increase water capacity  yeh?  This is just the kind of detail that makes all the difference to keen modellers, although one could of course cop-out and fill the space with coal.  Also of interest to me is the reddish colour ballast. Is this from a local quarry and which part of the country is it?

Not a photo by me. Just a link to Flickr.

Here's a top down view of the K1 Tender as modelled by Hornby.

 

[attachment=512191:HbyR3243-K1-loco-26-EditSm.jpg]

 

P

post-508-0-09948600-1419076267.jpg

Edited by Porcy Mane

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My K1 has turned up from Sheffield (probably via the GN&GE line then cross-country to Ipswich!) and while there's a bit of a viennese waltz gentle rise and fall going on with the footplate it's only really noticeable when it meets a straight-edge.   I'm happy to leave it alone for the moment.

 

post-171-0-18138300-1419076555_thumb.jpg

 

post-171-0-62099900-1419076542_thumb.jpg

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I'm starting to wonder if Hornby had modelled the running plate as on the prototype with the inbuilt angled fall running along under the boiler it would add a bit of strength?

 

P

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Fire-iron tunnel. Why didn't I think of that. Come to think of it, why didn't I see the caption on the right of the picture. Owd age I expect, anyway, thanks for your tolerance.

 

The more I see of this model the more I am sorely tempted. I have tried not to visualise one entering Delph! As an aside, the glue must be weak judging by the ease of disassembly. I found the same on the latest Gresley coaches, and the glue appears to be 'instant' (like Loctite) seeing as the parts can be 'prised' apart intact. Plastic glue would have melted both surfaces to form a weld.

Edited by coachmann

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Looking at the K1s allocations in the 1960s, I notice that a few were moved to Frodingham in 1960. I have seen a photo of one on a coal train at Gainsborough, but I am perplexed as to why Frodingham would need these locos when the shed had ample WDs and RODs for the heavy trains worked to/from there.

 

Does anyone know how the 36C K1s were employed on a regular basis?

If you look at earlier BR period allocations at Frodingham, there were typically half a dozen J11 on the strength, So the K1 - as a modern 0-6-0 equivalent - is displacing those. I'd guess they supplied power for the pick up goods, local passenger workings, permanent way maintenance etc.

 

... I'm probably the only bloke who would like to see some RTR models made available as fully knocked down kits?

 

The other way of looking at it is that a RTR model is no more than an assembled kit, and can usually be made to return to component parts with relative ease. The major disadvantage compared to a kit of parts is that you have to work out where the joins are.

 

But I am as certain as it is possible to be that the demand for an unassembled version of almost anything you and I would care to name is so limited it just wouldn't make commercial sense as a batch size. I'd be quite keen on Hornby's GER shortie tender B17 and a regular Southern Area B1 in kit form, as that should make the synthesis of a fairly accurate B2 relatively simple as a 'pick'n'mix' style DIY assembly. I suppose there might be half a dozen others up for that?

 

The happy old habit of 'bashing' RTR to make other things not (yet!) available is a minority sport these days. Look at the number of folks regularly posting their doings with the GBL series productions as their basic feedstock. Maybe two or three dozen happy bashers?

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 Also of interest to me is the reddish colour ballast. Is this from a local quarry and which part of the country is it?

I think red/pink ballast was the product of Shap quarry. Piles of red, grey and pink "stuff"can be seen next to the rail loading point here;

 

https://goo.gl/maps/NulX2

 

This 2002 pic shows weathered grey ballast, new grey ballast and new pink ballast. My guide told me the pink and grey had been both been delivered from Shap.

 

post-508-0-10260500-1419094084.jpg

 

Nairnshire Modelling supplies (or it may have been it's forerunner, Lanarkshire Modelling supplies?), used to sell bags of 4mm scale Pink ballast but I think the only place it sold in any quantity was at the North east shows, and to Modern outline modellers.

Perhaps if Dave Franks is reading he could confirm.

 

P

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The "pink" ballast has been around for 4 decades or so and most recently comes from a quarry near Lanark. I seem to remember another source was a quarry in Fife, near Ladybank.

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The reddish ballast was quite common in Scotland.

Travel west from Edinburgh and you can still see Binns (slag heaps might be a better known name to some people) of spoil from old shale oil extraction sites. Very similar in colour.

Bernard

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The reddish ballast was quite common in Scotland.

Travel west from Edinburgh and you can still see Binns (slag heaps might be a better known name to some people) of spoil from old shale oil extraction sites. Very similar in colour.

Bernard

 

The shale waste mounds are known as bings, the term is also applied to those spoil/waste heaps found adjacent to coal mines.

The Binns is a country house/estate in West Lothian which has been the residence of the Dalyell family for many generations, the current incumbent being Tam Dalyell (former Labour MP).

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And slag, though the term is often misapplied, is specifically the waste from metal smelting e.g. spoil tips at collieries, slag heaps at iron/steelworks.

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My K1 has turned up from Sheffield (probably via the GN&GE line then cross-country to Ipswich!) and while there's a bit of a viennese waltz gentle rise and fall going on with the footplate it's only really noticeable when it meets a straight-edge.   I'm happy to leave it alone for the moment.

 

attachicon.gif2014_12_023.jpg

 

attachicon.gif2014_12_022.jpg

If my 62024 when it turns up is as good as that I will be very pleased. Thanks for the pics.

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Desperately trying to resist buying one as a nice little railtour loco (as 62005)for New Bryford, but my resistance is becoming weaker by the day.....................

 

Cheers,

Mick

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And slag, though the term is often misapplied, is specifically the waste from metal smelting e.g. spoil tips at collieries, slag heaps at iron/steelworks.

I fear we begin to drift way off topic...

 

and why not... for here, freshly removed from one of the display cabinets in the British Museum of Railway Ballast is a piece of slag ballast. It seems since the last security check someone has stolen the highly sought after Shap Pink ballast, so for now, a poor quality pic of only slag ballast will have to suffice. :)

post-508-0-69099700-1419113102.jpg

 

Porcy

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I fear we begin to drift way off topic...

 

and why not... for here, freshly removed from one of the display cabinets in the British Museum of Railway Ballast is a piece of slag ballast. It seems since the last security check someone has stolen the highly sought after Shap Pink ballast, so for now, a poor quality pic of only slag ballast will have to suffice. :)

 

 

What scale is it? :jester:

 

Cheers,

Mick

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Anyway my K1 is happily working away on my rolling road and as I sit here looking at it I'm sure there is something wrong with the footplate everyone has told me there is but I'll be buggered if I can see it, and as luck would have it my straight-edge which I take everywhere with me is having the day off. :stinker:

I buy my ballast from a guy in a shop I've never asked where he get's it. :declare:

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the frodingham k1,s where mainly employed as pilot locos to help with heavy trains of iron ore between barnetby and Scunthorpe when I was a fireman there .....mali

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Thanks mali, although that is not really the reason I wanted to see as it means they would be less likely to wander further afield. Still, I can always invoke Rule 1.

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Desperately trying to resist buying one as a nice little railtour loco (as 62005)for New Bryford, but my resistance is becoming weaker by the day.....................

 

Cheers,

Mick

 

resistance is futile...........................

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