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USERS MAY EXPERIENCE SLOW PERFORMANCE, THIS IS DUE TO A DRIVE ISSUE WHICH IS BEING INVESTIGATED.

I think I'm in love...


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In my head, that sounds like a cross-dressing clown. Not that I've met any...

 

Come to Canada - cross-dressing clowns are all the rage here.  Every time anyone gets a hold of any piece of passenger equipment from any era, it gets painted into the CNR "1954" paint scheme (which was officially applied for just seven years).

 

It's even applied to locomotives that were heavily rebuilt in the 1980s.  Now those are cross-dressing clowns, IMO.

 

:onthequiet:

 

-Jason

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Holy cow!

 

Those spoked wheels are awesome.  Streamlining hadn't caught on with diesels at that point, had it?

 

It reminds me of CN 9000:

 

http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/Various/early_diesels.htm

 

Scroll down to 9000 and 9001.  CN didn't properly dieselize until the early 1950s, and these beauties were delivered in 1928!

 

-Jason

If you think THOSE are unusual, try this site

 

http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/LOCOLOCO/locoloco.htm

 

Warning, you'll probably spend at lot of time exploring the site - lots more than this page!

Home page is http://www.douglas-self.com/index.htm

 

Boats powered by boiling petrol, yes boiling it! - anyone?

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Was a consensus reached on whether it's a Co-Bo or a Bo-Co? Just thinking that if the OP's ever going to consummate this affair, it might be useful to have an idea of which end is which.

 

 

I think Talltim got it... :jester:

 

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Curiosity well and truly has got the better of me.

There's a Hornby Dublo CoBoBoCoWhatever on ebay currently just with a starting bid of 99p and another for sale "Buy It Now" for £265...

Hmmm. Assuming the 99p loco will not sell for 99p, it does make Heljan's Cl.28 look attractively priced. I just don't need one. But I want one. Damnit!

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Was a consensus reached on whether it's a Co-Bo or a Bo-Co? Just thinking that if the OP's ever going to consummate this affair, it might be useful to have an idea of which end is which.

 

 

I fell off my chair laughing at that one.

 

-Jason

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I have Book No D.M.L. 0.573. titled British Railways Main Line Diesel Locomotive Diagrams. It has a stamp in it that states "British Railways Locomotive drawing Office 2 Apr 1963". It states on Diagram DE/2003/1 quotes "1200 H.P. Type 2 C-B Diesel Electric Locomotive". Incidentally, none of the diesel electric locos have an "o" on any of the diesel electric loco diagrams

 

Edited so my sentence makes sense!

Edited by 96701
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I have Book No D.M.L. 0.573. titled British Railways Main Line Diesel Locomotive Diagrams. It has a stamp in it that states "British Railways Locomotive drawing Office 2 Apr 1963". It states on Diagram DE/2003/1 quotes "1200 H.P. Type 2 C-B Diesel Electric Locomotive". Incidentally, none of the diesel electric locos have an "o" on any of the diesel electric locos.

Only goes to show that even some original documents can be wrong!  

 

Technically it was a Co-Bo as all axles were individually powered and that adds a lower case 'o' after the letter in capitals (which indicates the number of powered axles on each bogie).  Thus the diesel hydraulics, which didn't have individually powered axles were B-B or C-C.  Carrying axles were shown by a number - thus A1A-A1A for a loco with 6 wheeled bogies on which only the outer axles were powered and !Co-Co1 for locos on which the leading (or outer) wheelset on each bogie was unpowered and the other three axles were individually powered.

 

It seems to be quite a common error to miss out the 'o' when it should be there.

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Only goes to show that even some original documents can be wrong!  

 

Technically it was a Co-Bo as all axles were individually powered and that adds a lower case 'o' after the letter in capitals (which indicates the number of powered axles on each bogie).  Thus the diesel hydraulics, which didn't have individually powered axles were B-B or C-C.  Carrying axles were shown by a number - thus A1A-A1A for a loco with 6 wheeled bogies on which only the outer axles were powered and !Co-Co1 for locos on which the leading (or outer) wheelset on each bogie was unpowered and the other three axles were individually powered.

 

It seems to be quite a common error to miss out the 'o' when it should be there.

But the US does indeed use a system that misses out the lower case 'o' and is ignored - presumably on the basis that the vast majority of diesel & electric locomotives built in North America has had each axle independently powered. Therefore you only need to identify those that don't meet the 'norm'.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AAR_wheel_arrangement

 

Since the UK now has much of its diesel fleet built in the US, perhaps this scheme will take take over?

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It's a Co-Bo because the six wheel bogie is at No.1 end and therefore comes first in the description of the wheel arrangement ;)    Which I think confirms that BoCo is a Co-Bo

 

You mean the good Reverend got it wrong then?

 

('BOCO' being the diesel being bullied by the two saddle tanks 'Bill' and 'Ben' in one of his TT books)

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You mean the good Reverend got it wrong then?

 

('BOCO' being the diesel being bullied by the two saddle tanks 'Bill' and 'Ben' in one of his TT books)

 

 

Surely the Reverend never got things wrong?  I always thought BoCo didn't arrive until Britt Allcroft persuaded his son to write some extra stories?

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I always thought BoCo didn't arrive until Britt Allcroft persuaded his son to write some extra stories?

 

Nope, arrived in 1965 in book 21 "Main line engines".

Edited by Kris
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Surely the Reverend never got things wrong?  I always thought BoCo didn't arrive until Britt Allcroft persuaded his son to write some extra stories?

Britt Allcroft had a sex change operation? No wonder she changed her name from Hillary...

 

I have the complete collection of the Rev's books but I'm not going to look it up because it sounds too nerdy to admit that.

 

Best, Pete.

Edited by trisonic
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