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Hello.

Im looking for anywhere I could find a OO gauge wagon turntable.

Does anyone make one? Or would I have to scratchbuild?

And any tips on making one? How about wiring it so a loco can go over it?

I have ideas of a planned large goods yard with lots of turntables, something about them appeals to me.

Any help is appreciated. Thank you.

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PH Designs do one in 4mm scale, which is only suitable for 16.5mm track as it has an etched top.

 

http://www.phd-design-etchings.co.uk/index.php?route=product/product&path=25_28_66&product_id=138

 

Useful to also read the articles written by Chris Nevard on building his layout "Brewery Quay", which used that above.

 

 

Also perhaps worth a look are

 

http://www.kitwoodhillmodels.com/on30-turntables/

 

I ended making my own as it was needed for P4.

 

However, as a 4-wheel wagon could weigh 12 tons or thereabouts, the are many light internal combustion and electric locos within the same weight range which would have safely passed over the same turntables.

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  • 6 years later...

Strangely enough, I found myself asking exactly the same question as Spitfire2865 and a search of the forum revealed an answer (PH Designs, etched kit*). However, the question/answer is nearly seven years old so I wonder if now there might be other manufacturers, perhaps laser cut card/wood or maybe 3D printed? Anybody out there aware of any developments on this front?

 

Cheers

 

Steve S

 

* What? Me? Afraid of an etched kit?! I should say so!!!

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Providing that it is used prototypically * there should not be an issue with wiring. If what you want is a tiny loco device, then you will need to arrange a split disc of copper clad paxolin beneath the structure and have wire pick ups from the rails.

* The TT enables a 90degree turn for wagons only which are propelled by horse, tractor or capstan. 

 

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1 minute ago, SteveyDee68 said:

 

Thanks - I knew of this method, but it is huge for a 4mm wagon turntable! Not sure about O gauge...

 

Steve S

Yeah, I thought it might be. It's a shame the Sony Minidisc never really took off...

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3 hours ago, SteveyDee68 said:

 

Thanks - I knew of this method, but it is huge for a 4mm wagon turntable! Not sure about O gauge...

 

Steve S

 

3 hours ago, HonestTom said:

Yeah, I thought it might be. It's a shame the Sony Minidisc never really took off...

There was a mini version of a CD at about 60mm or so (look at a loading tray and note the inner depression).

I had a couple of music ones that were free with mags.

Edited by melmerby
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2 hours ago, melmerby said:

 

There was a mini version of a CD at about 60mm or so (look at a loading tray and note the inner depression).

I had a couple of music ones that were free with mags.

 

Yes, I had one with the software driver for a USB pen drive I bought! It got recycled a long time ago, due to the software being for PC (I use Macs!) and it only having a paper slip wallet to protect it ... I never thought it might be useful in a modelling context!

 

I've had a bit if a ponder this afternoon (whilst down an internet rabbit hole!!) as to whether a standard CD might work, if part of it was covered by surrounding scenery... there would be no point cutting the CD itself down to a smaller radius, as the case it is in provides the running surface (bearings, so to speak) to keep it level etc. It is easier to draw than explain... I'll give it a go and post it here...

 

Hours of head scratching fun!

Edited by SteveyDee68
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I have a part built layout stored in the shed - I might resurrect it one day - which needed a wagon turntable in oo gauge. I uses a sheet of pcb, in which I cut a circular hole with a hole saw. See attached pic for the type I mean. The drill gave a pivot hole, and I used a nut & bolt to hold it to the baseboard. The underside was liberally coated with copper grease to aid smoothness of rotation. Very careful measuring gave the positioning for rails to be soldered to the pcb. Mechanically, it seems to work well, being rotated by hand, and wagons pushed over it by hand as the layout is far from a running state. It was very easy to make. The intention was to decorate the surface with plasticard planking, but I haven't got that far - one day maybe!

 

Stewart

HoleCutter70mm_web-1-1-150x150.jpg

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If you go for a four wayTT it is important that the four exits are perfectly aligned so that each will match any entrance. Don't ask how I learned this. 

This is a feature best made on the bench and then inserted into the layout when fully tested.

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Well. taken a look at a CD in a CD case and drawn the following up as a plan to have a go.

 

Notice that the turntable is smaller than the CD, so the cross section shows that the "surround" is effectively supported over the CD by the edges of the case. Looking at the one to hand, there is going to be a fair bit of trimming required to get a level top surface, as there are various ridges designed to hold the front cover closed, plus extra material at each side which might also need removing to get the base to sit flat!

 

 

Wagon Turntable.jpeg

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Perhaps a half height case would be better?

See here where the nearest one doesn't have the step down, the lip around the CD is just a strip which come up from the bottom (which is also the back).

1361712521_cdcases.jpg.f00a78ec8f14cac3c55d0b86cef339d5.jpg

Unfortunately the CD is held more firmly than those brittle fingers on the original case and doesn't easily rotate, but maybe you could ease the centre hole.

There are other alternative cases than these two

 

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Thanks Keith (Melmerby) for the above. I did try the lower profile case and, as you said, the fit was very tight - in fact, the CD would not revolve at all! I thought that building up the level on top of the case might be easier than trying to widen the CD centre hole slightly. I've actually took blade to plastic case and employed all sorts of tomfoolery to see if I could get a working example as per my drawing... I'll write up the methodology and post the photos tomorrow to show where I got to!

 

Hours of Fun!

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54 minutes ago, KeithMacdonald said:

Here's one we prepared earlier:

 

 

 

Thanks for the info - I assumed that this kit would be soldered and for me at this moment in time that would mean a lump of melted metal! But you have shown it is done with glue! Hurrah!

 

Now, not being picky or anything, and when you said "prepared earlier" you possibly meant a couple of years ago, but I am of a generation when if you say "Here's one we prepared earlier" then I expect, in true Blue Peter fashion, to then see a finished item! (Peter, John, Valerie and Leslie always seemed to skip from utter carnage resembling nothing on God's green earth involving sticky back plastic, coat wire hangers, paper mache and toilet roll tubes to a fully completed Tracey Island or a working printing press or some other amazing item of genius craftmanship!)

 

Luc (Pewky) promised part 2, completing the kit... :scratchhead: Hmmmm?!

 

Steve S

Edited by SteveyDee68
Dirty great big typos!
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At the risk of stirring up a wet Wednesday, whilst most of us spend three days searching out and repurposing , top modellers take a clean sheet of paper and have the job done by tea time. Discuss.

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1 hour ago, doilum said:

At the risk of stirring up a wet Wednesday, whilst most of us spend three days searching out and repurposing , top modellers take a clean sheet of paper and have the job done by tea time. Discuss.

 

I concur, even at the risk of a flame war about (a) what kind of paper and (b) what is the proper time for Tea Time.

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9 hours ago, SteveyDee68 said:

Thanks for the info - I assumed that this kit would be soldered and for me at this moment in time that would mean a lump of melted metal! But you have shown it is done with glue! Hurrah!

 

Now, not being picky or anything, and when you said "prepared earlier" you possibly meant a couple of years ago, but I am of a generation when if you say "Here's one we prepared earlier" then I expect, in true Blue Peter fashion, to then see a finished item! (Peter, John, Valerie and Leslie always seemed to skip from utter carnage resembling nothing on God's green earth involving sticky back plastic, coat wire hangers, paper mache and toilet roll tubes to a fully completed Tracey Island or a working printing press or some other amazing item of genius craftmanship!)

 

Err, sorry Steve, my attempts at soldering are usually horrible. In fact, they usually look like something Lulu (the baby elephant) left behind after her appearance on Blue Peter.

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  • 2 weeks later...

All the ones I knew of only were suitable for horse operation usually on quaysides.  There was usually a "no engine past this point" notice  board.  Maybe things were different in industrial settings.

       Brian.

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15 hours ago, Paul H Vigor said:

Were locomotives permitted to operate over standard gauge wagon turntables? 

Class 02 Yorkshire Engine Co. 0-4-0 diesel-hydraulics D2850-69 weighed in at 28tons 3cwt and are noted as being permitted on some wagon turntables in Liverpool docks (P124 The Diesel Shunter by Colin J Marsden has an official view of one standing on a wagon turntable ). As direct replacements for the L&Y 0-4-0 saddle tank 'pugs', it would seem logical that they too were allowed. I dont know about other locations and locomotive types, nor whether they were actually allowed to be turned, so perhaps others may have the answers to that. 

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On 31/01/2021 at 19:39, Paul H Vigor said:

Were locomotives permitted to operate over standard gauge wagon turntables? 

Hi Paul,

 

There were turntables in the Buckley Wells shed at the ELR and all sorts of locomotives were run across them, black fives, class 47's, 9F's. The only locomotive that was ever turned was the MSC No.32 Gothenburg which was masquerading as Thomas at the time, he had been delivered by road and placed on the track facing the wrong way for the Thomas event and so the wheel base was measured and it just fitted on.

 

I have a photograph somewhere but where exactly I don't know.

 

Gibbo.

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