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DaveF

Dave F's photos - ongoing - more added 6th December

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Hi, Dave. I like the Carlisle photo’s from 1990, which, as always, are full of interest. I particularly like the first photo’ of 85109, on the 30th May, 1990. It’s a very well composed shot and it shows the locomotive off very well indeed.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

 

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Surely someone will tell us the identity of the second loco in the first photo!!!

Jonathan

PS Very nice photos once again.

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43 minutes ago, corneliuslundie said:

Surely someone will tell us the identity of the second loco in the first photo!!!

Jonathan

PS Very nice photos once again.

 

 

I've no idea why, but I didn't take a photo of it.

 

David

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2 hours ago, corneliuslundie said:

Surely someone will tell us the identity of the second loco in the first photo!!!

Jonathan

PS Very nice photos once again.

 

I'll start us off with it being a Class 86 as there are three cab windows visible on the front end, and the Intercity Mainline livery makes it an 86/2 (or possibly 86/4) ;)

 

Rich

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Hi, Dave. I like the Bluebell Railway photo’s which are full of interest, and I particularly like J6361, at Sheffield Park, with P, 323, and H, 263. What a splendid sight those two engines make in that photo’.

 

The ECML photo’s from Darlington are delightful, and show a now long gone era from those BR days. 

 What an interesting ECS movement in C9552, with 45103 and two Mkll’s and a brake van, at Low Fell, on the 28th June, 1988. It’s very easy to model such a nice and compact formation.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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Hi, Dave. I like the Radcliffe on Trent photo’s which, as always, are full of interest. In C11977, with a Metro Cammell DMU on a Derby to Grantham service on the 9th June, 1989, the unit is actually a class 111. This particular set can be indentified by the lower middle cab window which was like that because of the now removed four character headcode box. The class 111’s also came without those headcode boxes, but were always fitted out with Rolls Royce engines.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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J6486. Looks like someone couldn't wait to get off - a door on the first carriage of the unit is already open, with only half the train in the platform!

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2 minutes ago, iands said:

J6486. Looks like someone couldn't wait to get off - a door on the first carriage of the unit is already open, with only half the train in the platform!

 

 

That was quite common all over the country when just about all stock had slam doors.  I have to admit I sometimes used to do it on the LTSR Class 302s.

 

I suppose people saw it as the railway equivalent of jumping off the rear platform of a bus before it had stopped.

 

David

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2 hours ago, DaveF said:

 

 

That was quite common all over the country when just about all stock had slam doors.  I have to admit I sometimes used to do it on the LTSR Class 302s.

 

I suppose people saw it as the railway equivalent of jumping off the rear platform of a bus before it had stopped.

 

David

Yes indeed Dave, I used to open the door it myself with slam-door stock, I just don't recall doing 'that soon' before the whole train was at least in the platform (maybe I'm not as adventurous as some other folk?)

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14 hours ago, iands said:

J6486. Looks like someone couldn't wait to get off - a door on the first carriage of the unit is already open, with only half the train in the platform!

Quite dangerous on busy stations.

I was waiting for a train on a very busy New Street Station platform when as the train came in someone threw the door wide open knocking me flying whilst the train was still moving. They immediately closed the door and vanished inside the train.

I ended up on the floor badly bruised.

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6 hours ago, melmerby said:

Quite dangerous on busy stations.

I was waiting for a train on a very busy New Street Station platform when as the train came in someone threw the door wide open knocking me flying whilst the train was still moving. They immediately closed the door and vanished inside the train.

I ended up on the floor badly bruised.

The Railway put up posters to try to discourage people from doing this, to little avail.  It was very dangerous and injuries and worse occurred, not only by knocking people over such as happened to you at New Street, but occasionally from people falling out of trains and being trapped under the door or doors being knocked violently shut by barrows and such.  New Street has nightmarishly narrow and often crowded platforms.  Occasionally someone would try to revive the early Victorian practice of locking the doors, which would result in the Armagh tragedy and the Versailles fire being invoked; they'd have taken too long to unlock anyway.  

 

Automatic sliding doors were a huge improvement.  They have trained the travelling public not to open the slam doors on heritage railways until the train has stopped.

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20 hours ago, iands said:

J6486. Looks like someone couldn't wait to get off - a door on the first carriage of the unit is already open, with only half the train in the platform!

So what is wrong in jumping off a train that is still going to fast and doing head over heals down the platform as you desperately try not to damage your new Genesis LP...........I was still the first through the barrier.

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Hi, Dave. I like the photo’s from between Nottingham and Loughborough. They are full of interest, and I particularly like the last photo’, C12008, at Loughborough, with a double headed permanent way train., on the 10th June, 1989. The two class 20’s make a fine sight, with 20095 leading. 

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

 

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I used to watch peak timr trains arrive at Sth Benfleet and before the carriage entered the platform he doors were opened this was common at all termini.

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5 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Automatic sliding doors were a huge improvement.  They have trained the travelling public not to open the slam doors on heritage railways until the train has stopped.

 

The younger generation have lost the ability to open slam doors or more often close them again!

 

The dwell time on HST's at many stations has been getting longer over the past few years as slam doors have became less common.

 

Mark Saunders 

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When Sprinters were introduced on the South Wales Valleys services, there was chaos until the regulars learned where to stand on the platforms to be handy for the doors.  The concept had been proven since 1928 on London Underground, and before nationalisation on the Wirral and Mersey, but it took a little while to become accepted in South Wales in the 80s...

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Love the photo of the 20s on the p-way train. Just look at that grampus in the third photo, a prototype to run any kit, no matter how badly built it is.

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7 hours ago, The Johnster said:

.......... Automatic sliding doors were a huge improvement.  They have trained the travelling public not to open the slam doors on heritage railways until the train has stopped.

As a guard on a heritage railway I regret that while we try to stop passengers from opening doors we are not always successful sadly. 

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It's much less of a problem than it was, thankfully, though.

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