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9 hours ago, Leander said:

 Younger's Tartan Bitter anyone?

 

Nailmakers Arms, Norton, Sheffield.

Thanks for the memory jog!

 

Mike.

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18 hours ago, Leander said:

They look like alluminium beer kegs, from which no self-respecting real ale drinker would ever partake. From their condition, I would hazard to guess that they are empty and brand new, being delivered to the customer no doubt 'north of the border'. Much keg beer and lager was brewed in Alloa, Edinburgh and elsewhere at that time. Younger's Tartan Bitter anyone?

Well, I've had more than one 'real ale/craft beer' that would not pass muster as pig swill and would get you chased up by the animal rights brigade if you tried to use it as that.  The middle classes will drink anything if it has been approved by some chinless wonder in a Sunday Supplement and is associated with terminology such as 'artisan', 'natural ingredients' (brings to mind images of Baron Frankenstein in his lab brewing up un-natural ingredients; a nonsense, as all ingredients are by definition natural or they wouldn't exist.  It's like organic tomatoes; I've never seen any that weren't organic) or 'microbrewery'.  On the other hand, some of such products have been a joy to drink.  Same goes for keg beer (note; beer, not ale) and you are right that no self respecting real ale or keg beer drinker would have touched most of S & N's output.  Keg beer is fine if it is to a good recipe, brewed properly, kept properly, and not pumped full of sulpher or carbon dioxides to make you feel that you've had a skinful because a) you were sick on the way home, b) you had a headache in the morning, and c) you were excessively dehydrated.  

 

N & S's was rubbish, as were Courage's and Watney's, and they sowed the seeds of their own destruction by preparing the palates of idiots and thugs for the lager revolution, UK produced lager being the very death of reason and the likely fuel for this RB's demise if a footex was involved.  Footex were good sense for BR's beancounters, as they used stock about to be withdrawn anyway and ensured that it was damaged beyond repair so that the railway could claim from their Lloyd's underwriters.

 

I currently drink beer in the form of keg bitters such as Worthington's, Tetley's, John Smith's and (especially) Brains' Smooth.  These are the despair of the real alers, but I don't care, I like them and enjoy drinking them, never suffering the above described ill effects unless i've seriously caned it!

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In a similar OT vein, what the hell is craft beer, in my experience it's a mis-spelling, the ft replacing a p.

 

Mike.

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Good evening, David. I like the photo’s of the ECML in Northumberland. They are all very well composed, and full of interest. In C19278, at Widdrington station, that is a lovely three quarters portrait of 37519, on an up light engine movement, on the 19th February, 1994. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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3 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Well, I've had more than one 'real ale/craft beer' that would not pass muster as pig swill and would get you chased up by the animal rights brigade if you tried to use it as that.  The middle classes will drink anything if it has been approved by some chinless wonder in a Sunday Supplement and is associated with terminology such as 'artisan', 'natural ingredients' (brings to mind images of Baron Frankenstein in his lab brewing up un-natural ingredients; a nonsense, as all ingredients are by definition natural or they wouldn't exist.  It's like organic tomatoes; I've never seen any that weren't organic) or 'microbrewery'.  On the other hand, some of such products have been a joy to drink.  Same goes for keg beer (note; beer, not ale) and you are right that no self respecting real ale or keg beer drinker would have touched most of S & N's output.  Keg beer is fine if it is to a good recipe, brewed properly, kept properly, and not pumped full of sulpher or carbon dioxides to make you feel that you've had a skinful because a) you were sick on the way home, b) you had a headache in the morning, and c) you were excessively dehydrated.  

 

N & S's was rubbish, as were Courage's and Watney's, and they sowed the seeds of their own destruction by preparing the palates of idiots and thugs for the lager revolution, UK produced lager being the very death of reason and the likely fuel for this RB's demise if a footex was involved.  Footex were good sense for BR's beancounters, as they used stock about to be withdrawn anyway and ensured that it was damaged beyond repair so that the railway could claim from their Lloyd's underwriters.

 

I currently drink beer in the form of keg bitters such as Worthington's, Tetley's, John Smith's and (especially) Brains' Smooth.  These are the despair of the real alers, but I don't care, I like them and enjoy drinking them, never suffering the above described ill effects unless i've seriously caned it!

When we moved to Edinburgh in the 1970s you could get McEwan's 80/- or Younger's Tartan Special and that was it. Belhaven shook the tree a little but it wasn't until the likes of Greenmantle arrived that things really picked up.

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9 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

When we moved to Edinburgh in the 1970s you could get McEwan's 80/- or Younger's Tartan Special and that was it. Belhaven shook the tree a little but it wasn't until the likes of Greenmantle arrived that things really picked up.

If that’s the case how on earth did Scotland have an alcohol problem? Of course....crap beer so everyone drank whisky instead...

Edited by brushman47544
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1 minute ago, brushman47544 said:

If that’s the case how on earth did Scotland have an alcohol problem? Of course....crap beer so everyone drank whisky instead...

I think it explains the popularity of a "half and a half" - half a pint of heavy, to quench the thirst, followed by a nip, to take the flavour of the beer away...

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Or something really odd the half of heavy and half of 'Sweethart Stout'. Sweethart on its own has to be the work of Satan, trying to be an angel (it must be pure sugar!), I wasn't brave enough to try it in heavy.....

 

Andy G 

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1 hour ago, corneliuslundie said:

C2919: is that the new Northern franchise stock?

Jonathan

DfT would not allow that, far too comfortable!

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Good evening, David. I like the Foxfield Railway photo’s which are all of interest. I particularly like J6112, at Dilhorne, with Hunslet, Wimblebury, in May, 1978, which is a great portrait of the engine.

The Bottesford photo’s are most nostalgic and all have their points of interest. What a freezing view of Bottesford in J7798, February, 1983, of the road to the station in the winter of that year. 
We do not seem to be having any snow this winter, just gales and rain.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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10 hours ago, DaveF said:

 

2065468854_HillCrossingBagnallHawardenBlythBridgetoDilhorneJuly76C2919.jpg.de416509acf0be32cf364d8c71cb3683.jpg

Hill Crossing Bagnall Hawarden Blyth Bridge to Dilhorne July 76 C2919.jpg

 

1899845944_DilhornePeckett11May78J6120.jpg.2bbbd37224019d0a3b9c143a7231cf9c.jpg

Dilhorne Peckett 11 May 78 J6120.jpg

 

 

David

 

those carriages look like they were converted from parcel vans, were they?

 

the last photo looks such good quality, it could have been taken last summer

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9 hours ago, brushman47544 said:

Enlarging of J7990 suggests 47598.

 

More likely 47588 as 598 didn't exist at that time. It also had a flush front at the No.2 end....

 

Regards,

Dave

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1 hour ago, sir douglas said:

 

those carriages look like they were converted from parcel vans, were they?

 

the last photo looks such good quality, it could have been taken last summer

 

 

Those Foxfield Railway carriages were, I believe, converted from scenery vans.

 

David

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1 hour ago, sir douglas said:

 

those carriages look like they were converted from parcel vans, were they?

 

the last photo looks such good quality, it could have been taken last summer

IIRC, they originally belonged to Boots the Chemist, working at their factory in Nottingham. I don't know what they were originally intended for, but they were at Foxfield when I visited 30+ years ago.

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1 hour ago, sir douglas said:

 

those carriages look like they were converted from parcel vans, were they?

 

the last photo looks such good quality, it could have been taken last summer

 

I've just had a look at steam '77, the ARPS Yearbook and steam guide.  

 

In the entry for the Foxfield Railway it states they have 4 LMS bogie scenery vans, Nos. 37508, 37518, 37519 and 38268.  It states two had been converted into observation cioaches and one is used as a refreshment van.

 

One of the photos states that they did indeed come from Boots who had presumably bought them from the LMSR or BR at some time.

 

Some further details from "Preserved Railway Carriages", Lloyd and Brown, published by SLP.

 

38268 was built by the Midland Railway at Derby in 1922 as a PMV MR Number 228 to Diagram No. 1198, lot no. 969.  Withdrawn by BR and sold to Boots in 1955, preserved in 1968.

 

37508 a CCTscenery van  built by the LMSR at Derby  in 1925 as No 46 renumbered in 1933.    Diagram 1875 lot no. 160  Preserved in 1968.

 

37518 a CCT scenery van built by the LMSR at Derby in 1927, original number 4700.    Diagram 1882  lot no. 308  Preserved in 1968

 

37519 a CCT scenery van built by the LMSR at Derby in 1927, original number 4714.    Diagram 1882 lot no.308    Preserved in  1968

 

David

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According to Longworth 37508 has since been scrapped.

Some (all?) of the LMS series appear to have used recovered MR underframes. (Jenkinson)

Edited by melmerby
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Have any since been restored to original form? I would say they were worthy of it.

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17 minutes ago, BernardTPM said:

Have any since been restored to original form? I would say they were worthy of it.

 

It appears not.

 

The Foxfield page on Wikipedia only lists one of them - No. 37519. 

 

Howvere I think their ex LTSR PMV No.1 may be one of them (38268) in my post.

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The scrapped one didn't completely die, the bogies and other misc parts have been saved to go under Stately-trains Pullman car Balmoral, and they fitted up perfectly on the original underframe of this car!

 

Andy G

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