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Dave F's photos - ongoing - more added each day


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  • RMweb Gold

Good afternoon, David. I like the Glasgow Central photo’s which are all of interest. In them you can see the roof and the patterns from the girders, which I think would be quite a challenge to replicate in a model.

The last photo’ of a class 91 on a Glasgow Central to Kings Cross express and also 87030, on a Glasgow Central to Euston express on the 24th February, 1995, shows how you could compare the two types of electric locomotives at that time. 
 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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  • RMweb Gold

Good evening, David. I like the Boldon Colliery/Brockley Whins photo’s. All are of interest, and it is always interesting to come across a station which has had more than one name. There are several examples in East Yorkshire. In the last photo’, with two class 142’s, with 142065 on a Metro Centre service, and 142022 on a Newcastle to Sunderland service, on the 25th March, 1995, you can see some minor livery differences. 142065 has rounded corners to the black cab window surround, whereas 142022 has square lower corners. However, the way the cab ends are weathering makes me wonder if it would have been better if the black had been extended to the roof since the weathering makes it look as if it has been.

The warning yellow is applied differently too.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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  • RMweb Gold
4 hours ago, eastwestdivide said:

C11600 - the chap sitting at the bottom of the ramp must have had quite an experience!

Indeed - but as he is sitting down unlikely to move. The two youngsters standing behind him might have worried the driver, however. 

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On 04/10/2020 at 10:33, DaveF said:

 

This morning's photos are some more from the Tanfield Railway, which as you all know by now is just south of Gateshead.

 

 

2003162959_MarleyHillSiemensHartonelectric928thMay89C11907.jpg.3a31b9f9cc15961d0c9b51b0a3add083.jpg

Marley Hill Siemens Harton electric 9 28th May 89 C11907.jpg

 

 

1881758017_MarleyHillSmithRodleysteamcrane28thMay89C11906.jpg.79e0e7b54797b1819959d85a867868fe.jpg

Marley Hill Smith Rodley steam crane 28th May 89 C11906.jpg

 

 

757081211_MarleyHillRSHProgress28thMay90C14478.jpg.a3ae0f3f33199dec13b846c2365ef986.jpg

Marley Hill RSH Progress 28th May 90 C14478.jpg

 

 

1583185832_MarleyHillRSHProgress28thMay90C14481.jpg.28f2342be5c9c863028155c9320f5057.jpg

Marley Hill RSH Progress 28th May 90 C14481.jpg

 

 

1714030073_SunnisideRSH21andHudswellClarkwIrwell28thMay89C11901.jpg.8edeefe259d0bda5a5c208e2bab84fa7.jpg

Sunniside RSH 21 and Hudswell Clarkw Irwell 28th May 89 C11901.jpg

 

 

1289216326_SunnisideRSHCochrane2ndAug87C8728.jpg.97c4892b993e2d1158d04f506f93d0d8.jpg

Sunniside RSH Cochrane 2nd Aug 87 C8728.jpg

 

 

David

Oh my goodness it’s a rather young me in the cab of Progress with my father in image C14481

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  • RMweb Gold
36 minutes ago, keefer said:

I think the down & up HSTs are actually up & down? (First Class at the London end)

 

They were quite often the wrong way round in those days as the high level bridge was often used then which turned the train as did the Cleveland executive to Middlesbrough but I think that had stopped by then 

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  • RMweb Gold

Good evening, David. I like the ECML in Northumberland at Southside photo’s which are all of interest. The first photo’ of 47311, on an up empty coal train, at 20.15, on the 17th June, 1987, is expertly composed, and shows that coal trains can be short, just right for a model railway.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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  • RMweb Gold
2 hours ago, keefer said:

I think the down & up HSTs are actually up & down? (First Class at the London end)

 

2 hours ago, russ p said:

 

They were quite often the wrong way round in those days as the high level bridge was often used then which turned the train as did the Cleveland executive to Middlesbrough but I think that had stopped by then 

 

 

I have had another look at the photos and they are correctly captioned.

 

They did sometimes end up the wroong way round, as russ p has explained they could be turned at Newcastle.

 

From time to time, if there were problems at Newcastle, a right way round train would have to use the high level bridge and would then be the wrong way round for the rest of its journey - which ciould be confusing for passengers waiting at stations.

 

David

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I had to investigate further once looking at todays images. The second one shows a couple of speed restriction signs laid on the gate post, the twenty MPH one appears in the previous shot still planted, but was the crossing still there? because the branch has already been plain lined and S&T have relaid the concrete trunking.

The rest show evidence of the branch slowly disappearing, absorbed by agriculture and nature. You have created a little historical record, just there.

Below is I believe the location, the Newton-on-the-Moor branch off the ECML to Whittle mine (opencast?).

 

image.png.ac66328bccfb30442dfc23ca605c7183.png

 

Regards,

Dave

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3 hours ago, DaveF said:

 

 

 

I have had another look at the photos and they are correctly captioned.

 

They did sometimes end up the wroong way round, as russ p has explained they could be turned at Newcastle.

 

From time to time, if there were problems at Newcastle, a right way round train would have to use the high level bridge and would then be the wrong way round for the rest of its journey - which ciould be confusing for passengers waiting at stations.

 

David

In those days they could be turned in Edinburgh on the Abbeyhill triangle too.

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1 hour ago, Davexoc said:

I had to investigate further once looking at todays images. The second one shows a couple of speed restriction signs laid on the gate post, the twenty MPH one appears in the previous shot still planted, but was the crossing still there? because the branch has already been plain lined and S&T have relaid the concrete trunking.

The rest show evidence of the branch slowly disappearing, absorbed by agriculture and nature. You have created a little historical record, just there.

Below is I believe the location, the Newton-on-the-Moor branch off the ECML to Whittle mine (opencast?).

 

image.png.ac66328bccfb30442dfc23ca605c7183.png

 

Regards,

Dave

 

 

That's the right location, there was once a signal box on the east side of the line at the junction, the location was then Shilbottle Junction.

 

It was Whittle colliery, which was a proper mine, not an opencast.  I've had a quick look through my photos, without spending a lot more time on it the crossover was there in June 1987, though out of use, it had been removed by August 1989.

 

I can't remember the exact date that the branch was lifted, it had gone by August 1986, the trackbed had been incorporated into the field by 1989.

 

David

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  • RMweb Gold

Good evening, David. I like the latest Blyth and Tyne photo’s from the section between Winning and North Blyth. In C6908, at Freemans crossing, with 56130, on the 15th May, 1985, you have captured a superb ground level portrait of that locomotive.  I like the way the large numbers have become weathered on the bodyside, amongst other weathering effects.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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I know I’ve said it before but I’ll say it again, I love seeing shots from the Blyth and Tyne, it’s nice to have a connection to the pictures.

 

I particularly like the shot of the Allan terminal, I used to fish there nearly every weekend with my dad or my mates when I was old enough.

 

The class 56 in J8599 looks interesting. I don’t think I’ve seen a 56 with white window surrounds, was this common? Unless I’ve not been looking hard enough!

 

Thanks again for posting.

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  • RMweb Gold

Good morning, David. I like the Lakeside and Haverthwaite Railway photo’s which show how varied the locomotives were at the time of the photo’s. In the last photo’, at Newby Bridge, with Hunslet, ‘Cumbria’, on a Lakeside to Haverthwaite service on the 9th August, 1987, you can see just how scenic the line is. Such a lovely photo’.

 

With warmest regards,

 

 Rob.

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On 09/10/2020 at 01:23, Market65 said:

In the last photo’, with two class 142’s, with 142065 on a Metro Centre service, and 142022 on a Newcastle to Sunderland service, on the 25th March, 1995, you can see some minor livery differences. 142065 has rounded corners to the black cab window surround, whereas 142022 has square lower corners. However, the way the cab ends are weathering makes me wonder if it would have been better if the black had been extended to the roof since the weathering makes it look as if it has been.

The warning yellow is applied differently too.

 

It looks as though 065 is in its original (Provincial) livery while 022 has been repainted at least once, as it would have started in the chocolate/cream livery. Perhaps that explains the detail differences in the cab end liveries between the pair.

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