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What is better for lining - a bowpen or a Bob Moore pen?


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Hello,

 

I am planning to do my first model locomotive paint job in full detail. It is a 7mm scale Terrier (A1X). Currently trying to plan an ad decide what stuff I need to but for said task. I wish to finish it in full Southern livery (white lining around tanks and cab etc.) In trying to decide in my head how I shall tackle lining - I definitely wish to try an persevere with ether of the above lining pen designs as opposed to fiddling with transfers, no contest in my eyes.

 

Hence, could someone outline the difference between these two pen designs (applicable to 7mm scale); and actually which one/model/nib size is a good choice? I am completely clueless about these matters!

 

Thanks,

 

Matthew

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From my understanding, you can achieve good results with both. Bow pens can produce finer lines, and are easier to keep clean - haff are a good manufacturer, although I've had good results from a Jakar one. There are any different makes on eBay. Bob Moore pens are more expensive, but can block up. As long as you keep the paint flowing, they can be very good.  

However, all of that is totally irrelevant, the best one for you will be the one you prefer working with  and get used to. I'd suggest starting with a bow pen, and practising before you consider the Bob Moore pen, mainly because it's cheaper. You can't just pick either up and be good at it immediately, it takes practise and patience. I'd also pick up a copy of Ian Rathbone's 'Modellers guie to painting and lining'. It will help.

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For Bow pen it depends on the length of the blades and thickness and also if you are left handed or right as to how it's be finished by the make a good one will be hand finished and tested

Bobs lining pens are very good and don't block if you follow the instructions of fresh paint and drop of light fluid

A bow pen can take a bit long to get used too

Hope that help

Roomey

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No idea of scale in above photo? I bought a easi liner which is intended for 7mm . I could not get any kind of fine line suitable for 4mm. Sold a bought a Bob Moore which when it works !! is much better.

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  • RMweb Gold

That's Pete's 4mm Ivor Mick, it is a little overscale for 4mm though as it's a model of a cartoon loco :lol:

 

I've got a Bob Moore, which with practice is great, but then I had it given me so it was a no brainer to get used to it .......

 

post-6717-0-83923300-1403162396_thumb.jpg

 

O gauge Slater's 4 wheel coach

Edited by RedgateModels
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  • 3 weeks later...

The main advantage of a bowpen is that a good one will produce lines as thick or thin as you like, simply by adjusting the thumbwheel. I always run mine on neat Humbrol enamel, straight from the tin. Although it takes a bit of practice, a decent pen will last you years, & can be touched up on a stone when it eventually shows signs of wear. It's worth buying some scrap loco bodies to spray up & practice on before you start on a precious model, whichever tool you choose to do the job with.

Personally, I bought a Bob Moore lining pen some years back, but really couldn't get on with it at all, particularly finding the fixed line width frustrating. I sold it on & went back to the bows..

Buying on ebay can be a little hit & miss, as you don't know what condition used stuff is in, & there's some cheap & nasty stuff that won't ever be suitable for lining a loco, no matter how carefully you hone the tips. As a rule of thumb, look for stainless tipped pens of British, German or Swiss origin if you want something half decent...

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  • 4 months later...

Drawing Compass sets often come with a strange looking tool that has two parallel metal plates, with a screw adjuster to set the gap. Not sure what the correct name is, but it's a "drafting pen", as used by draughtsman in the good old days of drawing offices and blueprints. Anyway, these pens are designed to give very precise narrow lines of paint. They're fully adjustable, for line width, and are very cheap. I'd look on ebay. You will need to spend a half day practicing (same goes for those rather expensive pens you're looking at), but you'll find it's time well spent. I was trained to use a drafting pen at art school. It will give an incredibly fine line, using paint or ink, and is adjustable to your desired width. So, in responding to your question, Matthew, let me remind you of the story of the Fisher Space Pen. NASA spent a fortune developing the Fisher Space Pen, a kind of Biro that works in zero gravity. The Russians spent a couple of quid at WHSmithsky, and took a propelling pencil .

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By the way, I've just been lining a few coaches with the proper tool: a 'lining brush'.

That's a type of signwriter's paint brush with v-e-r-y long, very soft, bristles. It's designed to be quite fine, yet holds a large reservoir of paint, so you can paint a long line without recharging.

I was given some of these brushes by an old signwriter and, despite my being a trained graphic artist, I was quite scared of them.

Then, quite recently, I gave these brushes a try. They're incredible, making the task of lining very simple!

So, before you spend a lot of money on one of those very expensive lining tools, may I suggest you pop into your local artists' suppliers, and get yourself a signwriter's lining brush.

The trick to using them is to  have something, like a straight edge, to run your fingers along. (You'd need to do this with any tool), and you'll find the brush does all of the work for you. A precise width, without any waves; those oldtimers really knew what they were doing.

 

Richard

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'd bet my wifes art equipment has some signwriters brushes I've seen something like it. I'll have to give it a go, Humm good job she doesn't look on here....

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  • 2 weeks later...

Pinline Masking Tape & TrimLine Self-adhesive Tape

 

Airbrush artists might like to consider using 'pinstripe tape'. It's available from 1/16" 0.34mm, and gives precisely parallel line masking.

See www.pinstripinguk.com for information on this tape, as well as some very good advice on lining/striping in general.

 

Another alternative is 'TrimLine' self-adhesive tape. Google to find further info. I'm sure someone will have reviewed it on rmweb.

 

Rick

Edited by Rascally Bear
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  • 1 year later...
  • RMweb Gold

Lining yourself by hand is a very personal thing and is down to what you are comfortable with and feel you can control.

 

I`ve owned a Bob Morre`s pen for years and used it for the first time this summer.

 

You must use  Ronson Lighter Fuel to keep the paint flowing. I only use enamels.

 

I decided to use stencils made from plasticard. 

 

 

post-17779-0-98047500-1477225614_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

post-17779-0-79160400-1477225653_thumb.jpg

 

 

Go for it !!

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I have several "bow pens", including Haff, Kern and Ecobra. The Haff is still available from the manufacturers. The Kern and Ecobra are no longer made but can sometimes be found S/H.

 

I also have a Easy Liner (.2mm) and have been loaned a Bob Moore pen with fine and medium heads to try.

 

I found the Easy Liner is easy to use but does not produce such fine lines as any of my bow pens and the result is much wider than .2mm. I wouldn't consider it suitable for 4mm but it might be okay for 7mm. I have yet to try the Bob Moore version but a friend has used one very successfully on his 4mm locos.I find the main advantage of bow pens - most of my lining is on carriages - is the adjust-ability  of the line width for different requirements.

 

Whichever you choose they all need  a bit of practise. As already mentioned, Ian Rathbone's "Painting and Lining" book provides a great guide.

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I have a bow pen, an Easi-Liner and a Beugler lining tool and all have their uses, the latter two being the easier to use for most.

 

http://www.pinstripingsolutions.com/

 

You pays yer money and makes yer choice.

 

Modelling in 7mm and SM32 means that my modelling needs are different to those in the small scales.

 

ATVB in haste,

 

CME.

Edited by CME and Bottlewasher
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