Jump to content

American made locomotives in Britain


Recommended Posts

I don't think anyone has mentioned the SR's USA tanks yet in this thread

 

SEMG is not clear as to whether they were built in teh US, but wikipedia, citing Bradley, says they were

They were built in the USA; however, I believe one of the preserved ones was built in Yugoslavia, copied from one of the American-built ones that ended up there.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I thought the USATC 0-6-0Ts were included in the reference to "dock tanks" in the original post.  Those built for Allied military operations came from Vulcan Ironworks, Davenport and Porter.  After the war 106 passed into JDZ ownership, where they were joined by copies built locally by Djuro Djakovic, which also supplied locomotives of the same type to Jugosav industry.  The examples that went to the Southern Railway were all of American build, of course.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I thought the USATC 0-6-0Ts were included in the reference to "dock tanks" in the original post.  Those built for Allied military operations came from Vulcan Ironworks, Davenport and Porter.  After the war 106 passed into JDZ ownership, where they were joined by copies built locally by Djuro Djakovic, which also supplied locomotives of the same type to Jugosav industry.  The examples that went to the Southern Railway were all of American build, of course.

 

80 of them also ended up in France, 77 in SNCF ownership as class 030TU 1-77 and three on the "Interet Local"  Bouches-du-Rhône railway. Unlike the S160s, that SNCF passed on fairly quickly, these USATC S100s  had a long and succesfull career until the end of steam in 1970  mostly as shed, industrial and dock shunters.  Their lack of continuous brakes and speed recorders restricted them to shunting duties though some were retro-fitted with Westinghouse pumps. 

At least three are preserved in France but one of those is in reality a Djakovic clone (JZ 62-046)  renumbered as 030 TU 46.

They were sufficiently well known in France for Hornby Acho to produce a model from 1968 and both Hornby Jouef and REE have recently produced H0 models of the class. I don't think the French S100s were as heavily modified for local service as the 14 in service with SR originally for use around Southampton Docks.

Edited by Pacific231G
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...
  • RMweb Gold

Borrowed. Many of those shipped to Britain in preparation for the invasion of Europe were put in service with "British Railways" in theory for "running in" but actually to augment the hard pressed British fleet. These were all shipped to Europe after D-Day along with others shipped to Europe directly from the USA and those that had earlier been shipped directly to N. Africa after operation Torch many of which followed Patton to Europe.

 

About 200 of the  five hundred or so that had gone to France with the USATC were made available to SNCF for its own operations with French crews and 105 of these became SNCF class 140U. They were though never fully integrated into their fleet and in 1946 passed on to other railways once the new 141Rs built for SNCF were available.  I think these were probably just loaned to SNCF rather than being bought and some of them probably worked for longer in the UK than in France. 

 

Not my area of expertise, but I think some were still in the Midi well after that. I recall seeing a photo of Narbonne depot with several of them and I think the photo was from the early/mid 50s.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not my area of expertise, but I think some were still in the Midi well after that. I recall seeing a photo of Narbonne depot with several of them and I think the photo was from the early/mid 50s.

Hi Joseph

I've found no evidence that any of the 558 S160s loaned to SNCF were used by them after 1946. Most of them went on to other railways but, given how many of them USATC had after the war, I wouldnt be surprised if some were left in France for scrapping.

 

According to Dr. John Davies and others,SNCF did consider buying 121 S160s from the USATC and got as far as designating class 140U but, after trials, concluded that they didn't want another US "Austerity" loco like the "Pershing" 140G from WW1. They preferred to acquire a simple American mass produced loco built to meet their modern requirements. That was of course the 141R and they quickly replaced the S160s when they started to flood in.

 

Though I don't have a source for this I strongly suspect that the US and Canadian builders were simply able to deliver 141Rs a lot earlier and faster than SNCF had anticipated so obviating any need to hang on to the S160s. They do seem to have always remained in USATC markings while in France and several sources confirm that they'd all left SNCF service by the end of 1946.

 

There's been a fairly lively thread on this on the Loco Revue forum http://forum.e-train.fr/viewtopic.php?f=65&t=75133

and there was an article on this "ephemeral" class in Ferrovissime no 74 earlier this year. I don't have that but I know someone who subscribes so if anything else turns up I'll let you know.

 

Update: According to Ferrovissime and Tourret's Allied Military Locomotives of the Second World War,  560 S160s were loaned to SNCF who allocated, 178 to the Est, 50 to the Nord, 182 to the Ouest, 150 to the Sud Est (of which 106 were oil burners) but none to the Sud Ouest (ex PO&Midi). The last of them left SNCF service late in 1946 and during 1946 and 1947 they were moved to other European railways, shipped to the Middle East or back to America. Two of them were tested at the Vitry Centre d'Essai and found to be heavy on fuel and basically unsuitable for SNCF's needs; so they decided not to buy the 121 they'd planned as 140U  but instead to wait for the 141Rs to arrive.  

Edited by Pacific231G
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.