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Horniman Park V2.0

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Welcome to Horniman Park V2.0!

 

The earlier layout, Horniman Park http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/25758-horniman-park/

has just been scrapped except for the baseboard.

 

I live in private rented accommodation on an annual renewable tenancy agreement, but had to move just over a year ago. My earlier layout survived the move pretty well but because the living room was smaller, I had less chance of running sessions and couldn't leave the board out there for long periods at a time.

Any other repairs or improvements on the layout were therefore limited as I then had to bring the entire board into the living room from the spare room.

 

Instead of one board, the oval circuit is made of four equally sized but smaller units, each of which can be worked on individually.

 

Each board is 597 x 715 mm. They are solid fridge/freezer wooden doors with laminate covering bought from B&Q. They're strong enough not to need any additional bracing and for my purposes precisely constructed to the nearest millimetre unlike some of my earlier woodworking projects.

 

post-850-0-70815900-1407608770_thumb.jpg

 

My living room floor's pretty level with a hard-wearing carpet pile so I can butt all these boards together without problems.

However, if I ever move to a property with an uneven floor where minor packing between floor and baseboards isn't sufficient, I'll use the old stripped-down Horniman Park version 1 baseboard for support.

 

Each module so far has these features:

- no trailing wires permanently attached to board for transformer or power pick-up;

- use of standard Fleischmann Profi track geometry (their radius 3 is 483.5mm) with 50 mm gap between end of track and baseboard joints and use of standard straight track pieces linking each board;

- can be packed away in its original cardboard packaging and stored safely away.

post-850-0-84668200-1407608812_thumb.jpg

 

I haven't decided whether to use single or double track although my experience has been that a second track hasn't been used so much.

 

post-850-0-45821500-1407608931_thumb.jpg

 

Construction's reached the stage so that I ran a Limby class 67 to test things out.

post-850-0-04670700-1407608950_thumb.jpg

 

For now, I made a trade-off between the chance of running trains against more detailed scenic work.

However boards can be stacked ready to use in my living room, unlike Horniman Park version 1.

post-850-0-71441100-1407608786_thumb.jpg

Edited by gc4946
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looks good, ive just finished  my folding baseboards for my layout so i know where your coming from re scenery  . :good:

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Once I've decided if I'm going for double track (or not), I'll design the scenery for version 2.0.

 

It won't have a station - this layout is modular and any stations planned will be on separate board(s).

 

In terms of scenery, I'm using the four separate boards in a positive way - features will be designed so they begin or end at a baseboard joint,

e.g. grassland will reach the edge of one board and the adjoining board will have a road or a footpath.

 

Unlike the first version, I can work on one board in my living room at any time and store it there for the duration of its construction.

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NEWSFLASH!

 

Both Horniman Park V2.0 and Westfield Priory boards ceremonially joined by a specially modified Fleischmann Profi track piece instead of an (unavailable) golden spike.

 

post-850-0-87680900-1407684643_thumb.jpg

 

Westfield Priory link: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/64666-westfield-priory/

 

This vital piece will benefit both layouts in the long run as I can have a longer run out for my Westfield Priory trains which had only been able to run only 4 feet on that layout.

Space permitting, in the long term, I could procure a similar straight length of board in order to make an elongated double track oval.

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Westfield Priory's board (the one painted brown with platform) is 1220 mm (4 feet long).

 

Due to its length, I won't be able to build a complete oval circuit in my living room without continually moving furniture around.

 

Instead for now I'm considering using 900 mm long boards for any designs using straight track, sidings and/or stations.

Fleischmann Profi's basic long straights and straight points are 200 mm long, which means I can fit four 200 mm lengths, with 50 mm gaps for linking track pieces at each end, from the baseboard edges.

 

I can assemble a complete oval formation with 900 mm long straight sections with space to spare in my living room and these shorter boards can be transported and stored more easily if required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This wooden frame, partly shown here to show how the four corner boards link together, is all that's left of the original Horniman Park layout top.

It began life as an artist's canvas frame bought from The Works store (usual disclaimer) before the covering was removed.

 

post-850-0-39521800-1407782711_thumb.jpg

 

I'm keeping this frame handy in case I move to another property that doesn't have a level floor and minor packing isn't sufficient to keep the board joins level.

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It takes about 7-8 minutes to set up the four corner boards as shown in post #1 from retrieving them from my bedroom to placing the first train on the track, and the same amount of time in putting them away in their packaging back where they were stored.

 

This takes much longer than my first version, which took only a couple of minutes (or even less) to do the same tasks, but again, it's a price I'm paying if I want a demountable layout in my present domestic circumstances.

 

So far Fleischmann's railjoiners have been up to the task and the 50mm baseboard edge to rail join gaps on all the boards makes things easier aligning the boards and lining up tracks without damage to the rail ends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Work's started on the first board's scenery.

 

The track and grass matting have been reused from Horniman Park v1.0.

There's going to be a park in the top r/h corner, hence the rather crazy pavement layout, and a car park (road surface yet to be painted) covering the majority of the board.

 

I'm still deciding whether to have an office or factory building where the car park stands, which must be removable when the layout's put away.

 

post-850-0-19559700-1408810825_thumb.jpg

 

The photo shows the board packed away within its cardboard box.

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I wanted to evaluate a ballasting method that didn't use granite chippings because whilst this looks the most authentic way of reproducing ballast, it's rather messy to modify matters if I subsequently changed my mind about the track layout.

 

Last year I bought a roll of Woodland Scenics green grass vinyl mat (RG5132) which hadn't been used and which appeared to have the most suitable density of material to reproduce ballast if repainted.

 

post-850-0-30182200-1408900656_thumb.jpg

 

I repainted a small piece using various mixed acrylics and felt sufficiently convinced to try out this method on track that had already been laid down.

As I don't have a spare curved piece of track with that radius available, I couldn't cut pieces out in long lengths so had to use several shorter bits to create the ballast shoulder.

 

post-850-0-76948700-1408900678_thumb.jpg

 

Once the Evostick sets properly, I'll get out the acrylics again to blend that all into the rest of the Profi weathered ballast colour.

 

 

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I've started work on one of the linking straight section boards:

 

post-850-0-01933500-1415531618_thumb.jpg

 

This is another B&Q product, size 715 x 147mm.

Luckily, Fleischmann's track geometry allowed me to keep a 50mm distance from the edges of the board to the start and finish of the main fixed-down section.

Their track pieces used as follows from buffer stop to opposite end of board:

 

1 x 6102 (105mm)

1 x 6103 (100mm)

1 x 6107 (10mm)

2 x 6101 (2 x 200mm = 400mm)

Total fixed down track length: 615mm

 

The buffer stop in this image is a Peco (or Hornby) mounted on an offcut of Fleischmann straight track, the whole section detachable in its own right.

 

The board is small enough to be used in various roles as follows:

 

1. Using connecting Fleischmann 6103 (100mm) pieces, it joins up to the curved track boards as seen in earlier posts.

2. By adding 50mm pieces at both ends of the board, I can create a plinth that can be housed in a display case.

3. In order to use it either as a DCC programming or test track, I can replace one end of the 50mm gap at each end with a detachable 50mm piece containing wires pre-soldered to the track, as a neater way than using bulldog type clips.

 

I've yet to decide whether to model a station halt or keeping scenery simple by modelling open countryside. In either case this will use my new method of reproducing ballast on the rail shoulders using Woodland Scenics material as mentioned in my previous post.

 

 

 

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NEWSFLASH!

 

Both Horniman Park V2.0 and Westfield Priory boards ceremonially joined by a specially modified Fleischmann Profi track piece instead of an (unavailable) golden spike.

 

Westfield Priory link: http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/64666-westfield-priory/

 

This vital piece will benefit both layouts in the long run as I can have a longer run out for my Westfield Priory trains which had only been able to run only 4 feet on that layout.

Space permitting, in the long term, I could procure a similar straight length of board in order to make an elongated double track oval.

 

post-850-0-60169200-1415554369_thumb.jpg

 

I modified the main running lines at the sidings end of Westfield Priory (the lines that pass right next to both sides of the platform) so instead of being 10mm away from the edge, they're now 50mm away to match the other Horniman Park V2.0 rail end boards standard. I therefore dispensed with the need for a specially modified Fleischmann Profi linking track piece.

However I felt it was impractical to cut back the three parallel sidings as well because I don't envisage the track on Horniman Park modules being directly connected to them.

 

Because one of the tracks finished on a curve, it was impractical to shorten the tracks at the station end of Westfield Priory's board, so all the tracks at that end stay as they are.

In any case I don't have room to fit a second curved module at the far end of the 1220mm long board as well because the whole combination would be too long to fit in my living room.

 

With the curved track modules and another straight section attached, at least I can have some serious proper end to end running.

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I'm having a station after all, but decided to buy another board from B&Q that was wider so a platform and its station approach can be modelled with some justice.

 

post-850-0-07103000-1415562275_thumb.jpg

 

The board's 715 x 297 mm and will be single track with a platform long enough to accept a 2-car class 156, 158 or 170 DMU.

The station can be used either as a through line, with linking pieces to other modules or as a terminus by adding a separate, detachable 50mm length piece with buffer stop.

 

Some platform sections (ex-Bachmann's Underground Ernie) will be reused from the original Horniman Park layout.

 

Currently none of the fittings are glued down but I'll refine the station design and approach in due course.

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Today I did more work on the station board.

 

post-850-0-82552100-1416153313_thumb.jpg

 

The back story is that prior to track singling in the 1970s, the station consisted of an island platform with minimal booking facilities all accessed by a footbridge.

As part of the rationalisation work, the footbridge was demolished and steps and a ramp were installed across where there was a second track.

 

post-850-0-81873300-1416153298_thumb.jpg

 

Track's been laid allowing for 50mm gaps at each end of the board and platform sections adapted for their new role.

Steps and ramps have been made from offcuts of plasticard but much work still needs to be done regarding painting and detailing.

 

 

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I've decided on a modular approach with my ex-Bachmann Underground Ernie platform sections, recovered from my earlier attempts.

 

Pieces have been cut and shut together, as well as scratchbuilding ramps and steps to form two possible platform arrangements.

 

post-850-0-57936400-1416741187_thumb.jpg

 

The biggest job was fashioning the curved platform deviating from the straight.

I've always fancied this type of platform so I cut and shut sections, but I've yet to fill any gaps, sand down or repaint my work but the basics are there to proceed further.

 

 

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Just realised ...

 

I could actually build a double track station with deviating branch line junction and mount it on a standard 715 x 597mm board.

 

post-850-0-01770500-1416746163_thumb.jpg

 

However I'll need to investigate whether I can interface the track geometry of this with the rail ends of my "Westfield Priory" board.

 

post-850-0-30597500-1416745885_thumb.jpg

 

(1st photo added after resizing due to it being too large for uploading)

Edited by gc4946

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I've revised my ideas on what should be on the 715 x 297mm board. Instead of a station, I've gone for a section with pointwork so I can run sidings off the modular oval.

 

The photo below shows the setup with the 715 x 297mm board feeding a siding leading to a platform bay, whilst the main line curves round on the 715 x 597mm board. The 715 x 147mm single track board butts onto both other boards, extending the siding to the platform bay.

 

post-850-0-41805800-1416772053_thumb.jpg

 

Platform sections are from my collection of bits, mixed and matched, and I still have some pieces left over to make another platform if need be.

 

 

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This was my acid test for the new siding - see how easily my Hornby 4VEP could be accommodated.

 

post-850-0-04260900-1416859791_thumb.jpg

 

It passed my test with ease, but then it had close couplings and a set of four Hornby (ex-Airfix) Mk2ds only just cleared the points due to its wider gap between carriages.

 

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All seven of my "white" boards have been joined together for the first time, making the layout size 2145mm x 1345mm and only just fitting onto my living room carpet.

 

post-850-0-79679800-1417277424_thumb.jpg

 

This is my best photo available of this setup due to the light and difficulty in getting a photo from above showing the whole layout, but this was a milestone that had to be recorded!

 

This highlights some track alignment issues that need resolving.

 

 

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This is one possible scenario for using the siding:

 

A unit terminates in the main platform (formerly a bay, but the platform beside the line which curves away has been removed). Expresses, light engines and freight pass by.

 

post-850-0-46942500-1418568583_thumb.jpg

 

I might call this Keyser Tubbs Junction, in LM Region mode, after the pioneering Keyser's (K's) loco and rolling stock kit manufacturer's first location in Tubbs Road, Willesden, London, running AC electrics to/from Willesden depot ...

 

or, as I own a 4VEP, in Southern Region mode, the 101 terminates at the other end in south London at Becco Road (Frank J. Vescoe owned Bec Models shop in Tooting, London and produced kits under the Bec Kits brand http://www.themotormuseuminminiature.co.uk/1907-e1-class-tramcar.php)

 

Another possibility is to name it after one of South London's lost rivers, the Falconbrook http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falconbrook a stream that flowed through Balham, Clapham Junction and Battersea where it entered the Thames.

Edited by gc4946

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I'm revising both sets of names:

 

Keyser Tubbs Junction will become:

Tubbs Road Junction - there's no possibility that I could model the actual Willesden Junction in any shape or form !

 

Becco Road/Falconbrook will become:

Longhedge - this will act as a staff halt for Stewarts Lane depot and for nearby residents, if I want to run it in Southern Region mode.

 

 

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After some deliberation, I decided to go for the simplest option, to dedicate one 715 x 147mm board for a single line terminus.

 

post-850-0-66175800-1419182278_thumb.jpg

 

I looked through my platform bits and pieces and the only way I could create what I wanted was to cut up another standard-sized Underground Ernie platform section married up to a set of scratchbuilt steps.

This platform can comfortably hold 2 Mk1s or their equivalents.

 

post-850-0-97367800-1419182297_thumb.jpg

 

The other advantage is this SLT can be displayed in a case and could allow me to go to town over the detailing in a way that wouldn't be possible with the main oval track boards because they need to be stored in their cardboard packing when not in use.

 

post-850-0-90015400-1419182315_thumb.jpg

 

This photo shows the SLT board in relation to the rest of the oval circuit (NB - not all the curved sections were erected)

Edited by gc4946
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Having looked at my stocks of materials and parts available, I'm planning completion of the station as a quickie Xmas and New Year project.

 

post-850-0-63707200-1419241201_thumb.jpg

 

It'll be an ex-Southern Railway station because I own a lot of Ratio concrete fencing salvaged from previous layout attempts.

 

I may invest in another identical 715 x 147mm board to model a similar SLT based on detail elements of London Midland Region's Willesden Junction and the Barking bay platform at Gospel Oak.

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Work's begun in earnest.

 

I'm evaluating a non-scatter material approach to ballasting, in conjunction with Fleischmann's Profi track, using Woodland Scenics' green grass vinyl mat (RG5132) and applying acrylics of various shades to represent ballast and ground cover.

 

post-850-0-75750400-1419251843_thumb.jpg

 

There's still a lot of work to do on the platform but I now have all the SR concrete fencing needed for the project.

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As it is, I didn't finish the station over the Xmas/New Year.

 

However, following storage in my display case I've identified problems with some of my techniques.

 

I was unaware that the board top when purchased had a thin clear film of plastic stuck onto it, presumably applied to protect against damage in transit. When I cut away this plastic film, the paint flaked off!  

At least I've now painted on the actual board surface and the paint has been covering and adhering better.

 

The Woodlands Scenics vinyl mat pieces curled up and shrivelled when they were painted brown, so they were all taken up and replaced by paper-backed Gaugemaster (rebranded Noch) grass matting, suitably weathered, which sticks better to the board.

 

The only good thing to all this is that I've spotted potential issues, before much work had been done, so the other boards will be remedied to prevent these problems re-occurring.

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At last I'm making progress and this is looking more like a station!

 

I'm waiting for the paint to dry now, before touching in any gaps and applying the obligatory white platform edging.

 

post-850-0-41284800-1425229492_thumb.jpg

 

post-850-0-74776500-1425229510_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

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