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I would say that it is a LNWR timber or deal wagon. The inserts are for the securing chains when not in use. They appear to be in the wrong pkavce as they should be nearer the ends. London Road Models do a kit for one. Photo in LNWR wagons Vol 1 page 164

Edited by Paul Cram
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It's not a LNWR D14 Deal Wagon, but possibly another pre-grouped wagon absorbed into the LMS or a LMS built wagon. The pockets were for holding the tie down chains when not in use. On the D14 they were above the axles which made for a bit of a tight squeeze designing the compensated chassis

 

 

post-1191-0-08746400-1533724141_thumb.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

Bit of a hiatus, been beavering away.... but as a bit of a distraction, I built this this week.

 

Palbrick_B_1.jpg

 

Palbrick_B_2.jpg

 

Palbrick B by Ian MacDonald (Macgeordie in these parts).

 

What a joy of a kit to build. I've admired his creations for a while but not had any use for one before now. Being honest, I don't really have a use for this, but I have a weakness for Palbricks and I wanted an etched wagon for my display at Hartlepool Show. I'm sure I can find a layout to run it on.

 

I can't recommend it highly enough as a kit - outstanding instructions on CD with multiple pictures, parts which fit where they're supposed to, spares on the etch for the ones you're likely to mess up..... they should all be like this.

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Bit of a hiatus, been beavering away.... but as a bit of a distraction, I built this this week.

 

Palbrick B by Ian MacDonald (Macgeordie in these parts).

 

What a joy of a kit to build. I've admired his creations for a while but not had any use for one before now. Being honest, I don't really have a use for this, but I have a weakness for Palbricks and I wanted an etched wagon for my display at Hartlepool Show. I'm sure I can find a layout to run it on.

 

I can't recommend it highly enough as a kit - outstanding instructions on CD with multiple pictures, parts which fit where they're supposed to, spares on the etch for the ones you're likely to mess up..... they should all be like this.

Beautiful!

 

And a good recommendation for his kits too. 

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My pleasure, Ian.

 

That rarity today, a day at the bench with little in the way of interruption. I caught up on quite a few odd jobs which had been piling up.

 

Mallard has been across the bench before, but this time it was terminal. We've brought in a replacement for the moment and I stripped it down today. The motor was all but seized, it took quite an effort to turn it. No idea what's gone wrong but the high mileage these locos run will be at the back of it. I had another in an A3 chassis I had for a future project, so that's been substituted.

 

Hornby_mallard.jpg

 

The G5 which works the automatic shuttle on Pilmoor had unscrewed a crankpin. I've Loctited it back in, but it's very sloppy in the threads and there's oil all over it as well. It may need a more serious strip and remake if the Loctite doesn't hold.

 

Pilmoor_G5.jpg

 

I've had the Hornby T9 under the bench in bits for a while as well. The motor gave up and was replaced earlier in the year and the motor mount then fell into two parts. This is a known fault with these, I'm told and Hornby don't do it as a spare. Luckily Peter's Spares have been enterprising enough to step in and they supply it as a brass casting. It needed some fettling but does the job and the whole thing now runs again. I'm also simplifying the wiring as we will never go DCC with the layout this loco works on.

 

Hornby_T9_motor_mount.jpg

 

A couple of wagons I acquired from Honest Tone of Little Bytham at Ely show, which needed refurbishment. The Longfit, I think from NuCast, had to be stripped and rebuilt completely. I'm looking at what to do about the 'Return to' lettering, which isn't on the HMRS sheet or easily made from it. i think I may end up drawing it up myself.

 

Nucast_longfit.jpg

 

The trestle has just had a repaint and some extra detail added. I'm not terribly familiar with the kit or the prototype and photographs seem a bit thin on the ground.

 

Parkside_trestle.jpg

 

Parkside_trestle_2.jpg

 

Finally, I noticed these at the Shipley show last weekend. Without having checked photographs they look very close to the equivalent LNER containers - as they should, they were all designed to an RCH drawing. A repaint may be in order if I can print yellow lettering of sufficient opacity.

 

Unit_models_containers.jpg

Edited by jwealleans
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Mick

They come from Frizzinghall Models now.

JW

I have a spare motor if the one from a rebuilt Scot is the same? My Scot had Malak death so I treated it to a Comet chassis .

I will fetch it Leeds show if that is ok?

 

're the trestle wagon. Is it plastic or metal?

 

Baz

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I think the same containers are the same as the ones which come with this lorry:

 

https://www.hattons.co.uk/261355/Base_Toys_DB13_Karrier_Bantam_articulated_flatbed_British_Railways_with_Type_A_container/StockDetail.aspx

 

I bought a lorry for the container before I realised the containers were available separately and have a project in mind which will involve using it, although Jonathan will probably finish his first!

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Mick, Baz is right about Frizinghall, the two stands were side by side at Shipley and there was only one bloke taking the money. I had not noticed the containers before at a show.

 

I hadn't noticed them as wagon loads either - I wonder whether that's why Bachmann have never done theirs as a spare?

 

David, I didn't build the trestle wagon, only stripped, repainted it and added some (slightly speculative) detail. It had been painted oxide, which did lead me to question how much the builder knew, but all the pictures/drawings I've seen seem to agree with his construction. That said, all I've found are pictures of models or drawings, so I can't say with any certainty at all that it's right. Peter Tatlow illustrates an older NER version as I'm sure you're aware, which I used as a guide for the bracing plates and bolt holes.

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Mick, Baz is right about Frizinghall, the two stands were side by side at Shipley and there was only one bloke taking the money. I had not noticed the containers before at a show.

 

I hadn't noticed them as wagon loads either - I wonder whether that's why Bachmann have never done theirs as a spare?

 

David, I didn't build the trestle wagon, only stripped, repainted it and added some (slightly speculative) detail. It had been painted oxide, which did lead me to question how much the builder knew, but all the pictures/drawings I've seen seem to agree with his construction. That said, all I've found are pictures of models or drawings, so I can't say with any certainty at all that it's right. Peter Tatlow illustrates an older NER version as I'm sure you're aware, which I used as a guide for the bracing plates and bolt holes.

 

Thanks , I got the last pair listed last night !! It will be interesting to see your LNER conversions in due course.

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Interesting that you've built the trestle wagon's "funny" side that way, Jonathan. Mine is stalled as I can't find photos; you'll notice that the official photos of the 0-gauge model have the "sides" stepped out well over the edge of the solebars. 

These wagons seemed to have been 8' 10" wide, the same as the Plate wagon from which they were derived- this is about 4- 6" wider than other 4-wheel wagons. The only photo I've found is of one of the BR-built, vacuum-braked examples, which has flat-faced sides on both sides of the deck, rather than the 'Plate' side in the model photo. This photo's to be found on page 139 of 'An Illustrated History of BR Wagons Vol 1' by Bartlett, Mann et al.

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Thanks , I got the last pair listed last night !! It will be interesting to see your LNER conversions in due course.

 

Also here http://www.springhillmodels.co.uk/unitmodels.htm .

 

From my research, they are to LMS Diagram 7, of which only two made it into BR ownership.

 

It would appear that they pre-dated the RCH standard, and that no other Big Four diagram exactly matches them.

 

Nonetheless, I have bought two pairs; it'll be interesting to research the conversion potential of the second pair.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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Mick, Baz is right about Frizinghall, the two stands were side by side at Shipley and there was only one bloke taking the money. I had not noticed the containers before at a show.I hadn't noticed them as wagon loads either - I wonder whether that's why Bachmann have never done theirs as a spare?David, I didn't build the trestle wagon, only stripped, repainted it and added some (slightly speculative) detail. It had been painted oxide, which did lead me to question how much the builder knew, but all the pictures/drawings I've seen seem to agree with his construction. That said, all I've found are pictures of models or drawings, so I can't say with any certainty at all that it's right. Peter Tatlow illustrates an older NER version as I'm sure you're aware, which I used as a guide for the bracing plates and bolt holes.

Bachmann type A containers 36-071 in stock at hattons.

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Mine is stalled as I can't find photos

There is a picture in Don Rowland's BR wagons book; it's from the end and shows the incomplete side, but all the visible features match this wagon. There's some extra bracing on there I'm going to add.

 

It's a BR built example (B number) but I can live with that - I've not found any evidence for one in LNER condition.

Edited by jwealleans
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From my research, they are to LMS Diagram 7, of which only two made it into BR ownership.

Following up on John's point, I think these are also very similar to the LNER diagram 5, built 1929-31 according to Tatlow 4B. What I can't locate is a picture of the doors, so I can't say whether the latching mechanism is the same. There is a picture of one from the side showing a long chain which I assume is securing a pin or similar, but I have nothing more definitive than that.

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Following up on John's point, I think these are also very similar to the LNER diagram 5, built 1929-31 according to Tatlow 4B. What I can't locate is a picture of the doors, so I can't say whether the latching mechanism is the same. There is a picture of one from the side showing a long chain which I assume is securing a pin or similar, but I have nothing more definitive than that.

 

Having also studied Tatlow 4B, I would agree that the Unit Models ex-LMS A container has much in common with LNER diagrams 4 and 5.

 

Pages 173/174 illustrate diagram 4 No. A188, and the general appearance is very close; however, the table of dimensions suggests that diagram 4 would have been narrower than the model. Anyone handy with a razor saw could easily remedy that!

 

Pages 170/177/178 illustrate diagram 5 Nos. A415 / A548 / A549, and the similarities to the model are again very marked; the dimensions are much closer, too. A415 has additional end and side horizontal strapping and a poster board to the bottom RH corner of the side. A549 has horizontal strapping to the end, and it should be safe to assume that A548 was so provided.

 

So - all things considered - the Unit Models A container can be repainted / relettered as LNER diagram 5 by all but the most pedantic of modellers. The diagram 5 prototypes which still operated during 1958 were A269E, A436E, A463E, A504E & A507E.

 

As to the ex-LMS diagram 7 version represented by the model; the containers that still operated during 1958 were A264M & A276M.

 

I have also purchase a four-pack of the Bachmann BR corrugated end A containers, and very nice they are too. The 'Flying Crate' liveried pair will, in due course, be retro-painted / lettered as early crimson examples.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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I've dived into a couple of plastic bags I must have picked up at a show somewhere this week, without much idea of what they were, other than whitemetal kits of planked opens.

 

Both have turned out to be GW and most probably ABS. Can anyone more knowledgeable confirm the diagrams and save me a lot of reading?

 

GW_opens.jpg

 

Any tips on anything not right at this stage would also be welcome.

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