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Been about a month of coughing and streaming, but I do seem to be on the mend now.   Just as well as we have a long trip before us... Grantham is appearing at Southampton this approaching weekend, so it was time to reacquaint myself with the stock.

 

A day cleaning wheels isn't the most exciting subject for photography, but I also had the fault list to attend to.   It's not often you have the time or facilities to fix things at a show and in the stygian gloom of Spalding it was even less likely, so there were a few items on the list.

 

In no real order except that in which I found them in the boxes, here they are.

 

Bach-J11-6049-small.jpg

 

I had a report that the Kadee on 6049 might be low.  These can droop - Hornby tender locos are quite prone to this but a piece of 20 thou strip jammed into the NEM pocket usually cures it.  I'm not convinced 6049 was the culprit here, but it's been treated anyway.   The bodyshell on this loco is still weeping oil, so it will have to be reweathered at some future date.

 

DJH-A2-small.jpg

 

2403, I was told, had leapt into the air and stopped half way down a ladder of points at the north end and been immediately taken off.   The culprit here was the leading tender brake shoe and rigging which had become unsoldered and found their way outside the frames, there to foul something trackside.  Repairing this reminded me of the downside of securing nuts with huge blobs of Araldite - no matter how carefully you clean the thread before removing, there's always enough left to bind the thread and snap the bolt.  I might add that it wasn't me who created the problem.   I've been saying for several years that I will repaint this loco and substitute the NER tender which I have already built and painted.  Maybe this will be the time.

 

DJH-C1-3275-small.jpg

 

3275 was arcing off the bogie wheels intermittently.   Examination shows that the (Comet) bogie had shed one of the fore and aft wires which retains the axles, so I assume it was able to move excessively and contact frames or cylinders.    It has been restrained and we'll see how it gets on.

 

Ks-J3-4051-small.jpg

 

4151 didn't have anything wrong with it, but when I was cleaning the wheels I noticed that the lamp irons I've been fitting since the very first show in 2013 still weren't there.  Today has been the day and by the end of the week there should be a proper coal load and maybe even fire irons as well.

 

Nu-Cast-Q1-3416-small.jpg

 

This is Long Tom 3416 which has a history of wrapping the tender pickups around things.  They are long and vulnerable - the latest attempt is in a more rigid wire which may be less prone to catching.   Again, time and use will tell.

 

DS-GE-Lowmac-small.jpg

 

The South End boys complained that this Lowmac (D & S with a scratchbuilt load) was too light and hard to shunt.   It's had some strategically applied lead flashing which has since been painted.  I don't like uncovered lead on vehicles.

 

RDEB-BFK-end-door.jpg

 

This is the GNR D96 BFK which runs at the rear of Set 5.  I had a note that the tail lamp was missing, but the end door cover had been knocked off as well.   Both were in the box and  easily reapplied.   The cover is the MJT etch, the lamp one of John Marsh's lovely 3D prints (which may now be in the ModelU range).

 

BB-D7-small.jpg

 

This was a more involved problem.   We had noticed that we seemed to have an intermittent short on Set 5 in one configuration and by leaving vehicles out had narrowed it down to the last two in the set.   This is a D7 CK, from a Bill Bedford kit.  Examining the underside it was at once apparent that the MJT bogie had gone past the stops and jammed.  For those who aren't familiar with them, the two halves of the bogie can move about the central wire, giving excellent running and roadholding.  There are tabs to prevent them going too far (more or less behind the axles in the picture) and the bogies can force their way past these and jam.  This had happened, but the displacement wasn't enough to stop the carriage running.   What it almost certainly did, though, was jam one wheel from each side against the brass floor, so completing a circuit and impeding the running.   There were score marks on the floor where the wheels had rubbed before, so some black paper has been stuck over the contact areas to prevent future conductivity.

 

Finally and not for Grantham, what little tinkering I have had the energy or inclination to do has been with wagons.   This is one of my demonstration pieces.  I had acquired four (I think) Ratio Macaws more or less by accident in different job lots, so I decided to see what I could do with them.   I appreciate they're not completely accurate, but they can scrub up into a nice looking wagon.  On my show stand I have one 'as found', a repainted one then a weathered and loaded one, so people can see that you can pick up a wagon for a couple of quid out of a rummage bin and use it to practice on but still have the potential to make something which looks good on your layout.

 

ratio-macaw-small.jpg

 

I hope some readers will be able to make Southampton - please make yourself known if you do, but remember that we do have to run the layout and can't always spare the time to chat there and then.

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On 19/01/2020 at 21:00, jwealleans said:

Been about a month of coughing and streaming, but I do seem to be on the mend now.   Just as well as we have a long trip before us... Grantham is appearing at Southampton this approaching weekend, so it was time to reacquaint myself with the stock.

 

A day cleaning wheels isn't the most exciting subject for photography, but I also had the fault list to attend to.   It's not often you have the time or facilities to fix things at a show and in the stygian gloom of Spalding it was even less likely, so there were a few items on the list.

 

In no real order except that in which I found them in the boxes, here they are.

 

Bach-J11-6049-small.jpg

 

I had a report that the Kadee on 6049 might be low.  These can droop - Hornby tender locos are quite prone to this but a piece of 20 thou strip jammed into the NEM pocket usually cures it.  I'm not convinced 6049 was the culprit here, but it's been treated anyway.   The bodyshell on this loco is still weeping oil, so it will have to be reweathered at some future date.

 

DJH-A2-small.jpg

 

2403, I was told, had leapt into the air and stopped half way down a ladder of points at the north end and been immediately taken off.   The culprit here was the leading tender brake shoe and rigging which had become unsoldered and found their way outside the frames, there to foul something trackside.  Repairing this reminded me of the downside of securing nuts with huge blobs of Araldite - no matter how carefully you clean the thread before removing, there's always enough left to bind the thread and snap the bolt.  I might add that it wasn't me who created the problem.   I've been saying for several years that I will repaint this loco and substitute the NER tender which I have already built and painted.  Maybe this will be the time.

 

DJH-C1-3275-small.jpg

 

3275 was arcing off the bogie wheels intermittently.   Examination shows that the (Comet) bogie had shed one of the fore and aft wires which retains the axles, so I assume it was able to move excessively and contact frames or cylinders.    It has been restrained and we'll see how it gets on.

 

Ks-J3-4051-small.jpg

 

4151 didn't have anything wrong with it, but when I was cleaning the wheels I noticed that the lamp irons I've been fitting since the very first show in 2013 still weren't there.  Today has been the day and by the end of the week there should be a proper coal load and maybe even fire irons as well.

 

Nu-Cast-Q1-3416-small.jpg

 

This is Long Tom 3416 which has a history of wrapping the tender pickups around things.  They are long and vulnerable - the latest attempt is in a more rigid wire which may be less prone to catching.   Again, time and use will tell.

 

DS-GE-Lowmac-small.jpg

 

The South End boys complained that this Lowmac (D & S with a scratchbuilt load) was too light and hard to shunt.   It's had some strategically applied lead flashing which has since been painted.  I don't like uncovered lead on vehicles.

 

RDEB-BFK-end-door.jpg

 

This is the GNR D96 BFK which runs at the rear of Set 5.  I had a note that the tail lamp was missing, but the end door cover had been knocked off as well.   Both were in the box and  easily reapplied.   The cover is the MJT etch, the lamp one of John Marsh's lovely 3D prints (which may now be in the ModelU range).

 

BB-D7-small.jpg

 

This was a more involved problem.   We had noticed that we seemed to have an intermittent short on Set 5 in one configuration and by leaving vehicles out had narrowed it down to the last two in the set.   This is a D7 CK, from a Bill Bedford kit.  Examining the underside it was at once apparent that the MJT bogie had gone past the stops and jammed.  For those who aren't familiar with them, the two halves of the bogie can move about the central wire, giving excellent running and roadholding.  There are tabs to prevent them going too far (more or less behind the axles in the picture) and the bogies can force their way past these and jam.  This had happened, but the displacement wasn't enough to stop the carriage running.   What it almost certainly did, though, was jam one wheel from each side against the brass floor, so completing a circuit and impeding the running.   There were score marks on the floor where the wheels had rubbed before, so some black paper has been stuck over the contact areas to prevent future conductivity.

 

Finally and not for Grantham, what little tinkering I have had the energy or inclination to do has been with wagons.   This is one of my demonstration pieces.  I had acquired four (I think) Ratio Macaws more or less by accident in different job lots, so I decided to see what I could do with them.   I appreciate they're not completely accurate, but they can scrub up into a nice looking wagon.  On my show stand I have one 'as found', a repainted one then a weathered and loaded one, so people can see that you can pick up a wagon for a couple of quid out of a rummage bin and use it to practice on but still have the potential to make something which looks good on your layout.

 

ratio-macaw-small.jpg

 

I hope some readers will be able to make Southampton - please make yourself known if you do, but remember that we do have to run the layout and can't always spare the time to chat there and then.

 

Good morning Jonathan,

 

the lamp on the back of your carriage gangway certain looks like one of Johns. One little point, the lamp is actually an LNER guards van tail lamp, John originally produced both LNER guards van and passenger carriage tail lamps. Modelu only sell the guards van tail lamp, though I don't think it is identified as such. I include a photo of the LNER passenger carriage tail lamp for comparison.

 

P.S. are there still plans for the steel panelled BGs to become available as kits?

 

Brake end Guards lamp.jpg

Edited by Headstock
add space between image and text.
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Thank you, Andrew.   I'll be honest, I stuck the lamp which was in the box with the carriage back on.   I'll have to look at the bags now as I had some of both from John.  I may have labelled them the wrong way round.   He's done me a pair of really nice GN lamps for the Stirling Single as well which I must get round to painting.    I was hoping to be able to do the in red, their proper colour, but 1938 photos clearly show that the lamps used were white.

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25 minutes ago, jwealleans said:

Thank you, Andrew.   I'll be honest, I stuck the lamp which was in the box with the carriage back on.   I'll have to look at the bags now as I had some of both from John.  I may have labelled them the wrong way round.   He's done me a pair of really nice GN lamps for the Stirling Single as well which I must get round to painting.    I was hoping to be able to do the in red, their proper colour, but 1938 photos clearly show that the lamps used were white.

 

Jonathan,

 

I think I know the lamps you mean, they look most attractive. Wasn't 2001 often photographed carrying the same kind? They should look very nice on your (flying Scotsman?) Stirling Single set. A smashing piece of modelling. The LNER Guards van lamps had an adjustable handle while that on the passenger lamp was fixed. The little notch in the Guards van handle was so that it could be hung up without sliding about, I think BR did something similar. The streamliners usually had two of the passenger tail lamps on the back. Their twin 'hooped' handles are very noticeable in photographs.

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1 hour ago, jwealleans said:

Because they were non-stop; if a lamp went out they wouldn't have to be checked to have it replaced as the other would still be burning.

Interesting Jonathan. I'd have thought that would apply to any train where a lamp went out between scheduled stops.

 

I did find this too: https://www.lner.info/forums/viewtopic.php?t=11863 with your contribution!

 

 

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Just now, St Enodoc said:

I'd have thought that would apply to any train where a lamp went out between scheduled stops.

Indeed, but the streamliners were not just any trains.

 

This on the 'Silver Jubilee' may be of interest:-

 

The ‘Silver Jubilee’ carried two tail lamps as mentioned in No 4 Supplement to the Appendix to the WTTs (Southern Area) June 1937 – ‘The Silver Jubilee train carries two tail lamps in order to avoid its being stopped when the tail lamp becomes extinguished.  The Train Passed Without Tail Lamp signal must not be sent whilst one of the tail lamps is seen to be alight.  The presence of two tail lamps must not be regarded as an indication that a special train is following, as described in Rules 124 and 223’.

 

from 'The Silver Jubilee' by David Woodward in LNER Society Journal 63, p13.

 

The rules quoted make it clear that the normal purpose of an extra lamp on the rear of a train or light engine was to indicate to the signalmen that the train would be followed by a train run at short notice, which they would not otherwise have known to expect.

 

D

 

 

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2 hours ago, Darryl Tooley said:

Indeed, but the streamliners were not just any trains.

 

This on the 'Silver Jubilee' may be of interest:-

 

The ‘Silver Jubilee’ carried two tail lamps as mentioned in No 4 Supplement to the Appendix to the WTTs (Southern Area) June 1937 – ‘The Silver Jubilee train carries two tail lamps in order to avoid its being stopped when the tail lamp becomes extinguished.  The Train Passed Without Tail Lamp signal must not be sent whilst one of the tail lamps is seen to be alight.  The presence of two tail lamps must not be regarded as an indication that a special train is following, as described in Rules 124 and 223’.

 

from 'The Silver Jubilee' by David Woodward in LNER Society Journal 63, p13.

 

The rules quoted make it clear that the normal purpose of an extra lamp on the rear of a train or light engine was to indicate to the signalmen that the train would be followed by a train run at short notice, which they would not otherwise have known to expect.

 

D

 

 

Thanks Darryl. That makes it very clear.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Morning everyone,

 

On a whim at the weekend I took out a couple of whitemetal vehicles I'd acquired by accident in some job lot or other.   One I can easily identify, the other is a John Day kit with no identification on the label.   Can anyone tell me what it is?   Comments on accuracy would also be appreciated as it looks too large to me to be 1:76.

 

IMG_2532.JPG.d07c621fbab286000255a7ee26d9fce6.JPG

 

IMG_2531.JPG.d1ff0512c852abcdacef0409a2c0b871.JPG

 

IMG_2530.JPG.73cf13a9c597ab439d1a2defa81b7c99.JPG

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  • 4 weeks later...

Turns out John Day kits are still available under new management.  I thought they'd finished when he died.    The new proprietor was very helpful and tells me that this is a Dennis Type 96 LMS parcels van.  It's not presently available as it's up for retooling but he was able to let me have some transfers for it.

 

Southampton came and went (what an excellent show, by the way) and I've had a jolly out to Glasgow since as well.   In between I have managed a small amount of modelling and there are a number of items approaching finishing.

 

Grain-hopper-highfit.jpg

 

Parkside highfit, nothing exceptional except that to hide a disfigured transfer on the far side I tried to make it look badly sheeted, so the sheet was cockeyed and hung down far more on one side than the other.  Harder than it sounds.  The grain hopper was an idea for something to do with a Hornby one other than fill it with coal.  I thought they were a temporary postwar measure, but then I saw a picture of one in a train from 1952 and found that BR built a whole batch in the early 1950s.  I don't recall seeing one modelled before.

 

sr-mex-gw-open.jpg

 

ABS GWR open (I'm afraid I forget the diagram) and a Hornby SR cattle wagon which was being sold off by one of the big retailers (Kernow, I think).  A very nice model indeed which has had almost nothing done to it except the roof painting and an overall weathering.

 

Now a bit of a story.  When I demonstrate wagon building at shows, I usually have two or three basket cases on the display stand and suggest to people that they pick up cheap wagons from rummage bins at shows and use them to practice on.  This Parkside fruit van, missing one axle, buffers and most of the brake gear, has been in the box for a couple of years.   At Warley last November I explained carefully to a young lad how I would be refurbishing it, what parts would be replaced and ended with '... and you can see it running on Grantham next year'.   The law of Sod dictates that he will turn up and demand to see it at a future show, so I thought I ought to put my soldering iron where my mouth was.   The photos will make a useful addition to the display so I can show people what I mean.

 

PD-fruit-start.jpg

 

PD-fruit-start-2.jpg

 

PD-fruit-start-3.jpg

 

This is it as it started.   I've removed what was left of the brake gear which wasn't salvageable, cleaned out underneath for an MJT W iron unit, drilled through the buffer stocks for LMS replacements and removed what was left of the roof vents.  I stripped the paint when I first acquired it.

 

PD-fruit-brake-gear.jpg

 

PD-fruit-brake-gear-under.jpg

 

This was it a couple of weeks ago - axleguards and brake gear fitted, extra wire used for the usual detail I put under a PD fitted van and the LMS buffers in place.

 

PD-fruit-buffers.jpg

 

Roof vents were replaced - these are plastic (I suspect they came from a Roger Chivers pigeon brake) and I happened to have 6 of them.  

 

PD-fruit-painted.jpg

 

It then made its way through the paint shop....

 

PD-fruit-plate-painted.jpg

 

PD-fruit-lettered.jpg

 

... and was lettered and varnished last week.   Just the wheels to paint and then it can take its turn in the weathering queue. It will be in the Scotch Goods at Leeds Show in October.

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Quote

Some of the "hoppers" had a fixed sheet rail.

 

... as does mine.   I went from Peter Tatlow's book Vol. 4A and one of Dave Larkin's more recent volumes.

 

Saving basket cases does give a great deal of pleasure and it's picked me up a few bargains over the years as well.   I do get more of a buzz from seeing something fit for the bin running round an exhibition layout and not looking out of place and if it doesn't work out, well, you're not massively out of pocket.

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8 hours ago, Barry O said:

Some of the "hoppers" had a fixed sheet rail. It's in the bradford Barton picture book on BR Standard Wagons..I think

Baz

Page 21. B419213 built Shildon 1955 to Lot 2854 according to Larkin but Lot 2954 according to Rowland. Rowland says that Lot 2854 was diagram 1/067 Conflat A so I'd go with Lot 2954, Diagram 1/146 which Rowland says were "adapted for grain traffic between Millwall Dock and Welwyn GC" - the Nabisco factory I presume.

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