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Brian D

Deneside - BR North Eastern Region

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On ‎05‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 19:04, Brian D said:

 

 

The last time we got up to Easington was two years ago and I hadn't been around the beach banks since my schooldays so we had walk round and I took these pics, among others.

 

We accessed the path to the coast via this bridge...

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010049.jpg.1459f7d68152704e95c97dda6973e315.jpg

 

...and this was the view looking south towards Teesside...

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010029.jpg.b649c78e599237f9036697428f126f29.jpg

 

...and inland westward to Easington Colliery.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010036.jpg.6af33247216c640e88fea541043e6fd4.jpg

 

And the last time I gazed down on the beach here it was black.  Looking north towards Hawthorn...

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010037.jpg.68a8f43490499c94db53604849abe02c.jpg

 

...and south again towards Teesside and West Hartlepool.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010039.jpg.87c16ad90d08fc40abf0812b88d3cd1e.jpg

 

If my memory serves, this is the rock on which the last pylon of the ariel flight was position and whereat the colliery waste was dumped in the sea.

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010041.jpg.83b74a7dc1c8e3c7f6aa6a1abacaa6ff.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/P1010040.jpg.25d107cc2ad954c5fa8ea44362fa6023.jpg

 

An amazing transformation when you compare it to the "Get Carter" ending, although that was filmed further along the coast at Hordern or Blackhall I think but Easington beach was just as black - see link https://youtu.be/nWfrpqGDJig?t=14

 

 

Regards,

Brian.

 

You got the weather!

 

Is that the bridge with the odd parapets?DSCF5736.JPG.d1ceba47634a497f9378b7330d5e9dde.JPG

 

This is the landward side.  I turned it round on my layout as this side is much more interesting.   The best info is that the original parapet went in a derailment, but I've not been able to find the date.  The water is the River Soddit - at least that is the gist of what I said when it entererd my trainer...

 

DSCF5734.JPG.03f6bdc14a2147ac57a79f9dd34f986d.JPG

 

There seems to have been a deal of additional fencing put up around here since my visit.  It would appear Network Rail don't like people walking on the track.

 

BTW the newspaper insert with the latest Railway Mag has a piece from 1903 on the opening of the coast line, with pics of Hawthorn Dene viaduct newly built and under construction.

 

I keep telling everyone the end of Get Carter was filmed at Blackhall.  I do hope I got it right.  The novel is set in Scunthorpe (Sunny Scunny, the cultural capital of Lincolnshire) but the film was moved apparently because nobody had a clue where Scunthorpe is.  There still seem to be a lot who don't.

 

All the very best

 

Les

 

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I'm sure that's the same bridge. Comparing your pic with mine it seems the extra fencing still can't keep the rattle can "artists" out.

 

Regards

Brian.

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We have been away again, this time to the Lake District.

 

IMG_20190820_175154a.jpg.b00212eedb161cb500ad13986d1709bc.jpg

 

Beautiful place but somewhat iffy weather.  On the way back, we broke our journey in the Midlands and I squeezed in a quick visit to the Great Central Railway to make this video.

 

 

 

 

While we were away, this parcel arrived.

 

IMG_20190820_144935.jpg.feb96f786b867e52d39d1569d10dc9f1.jpg

 

I have decided to depart from the instructions (which require the posts to be glued to the layout before the wires are threaded through) and build a short length "off site" as a trial to fence off the foot of the embankment here...

 

IMG_20190820_164925.jpg.17d74ccf63c49f6914d2779c6976c77f.jpg

 

...before making much longer lengths here.

 

IMG_20190820_164931.jpg.5b105ffab08d413c021e864f5479e7de.jpg

 

So I have made up a jig so the posts are uniformly 6 scale feet apart.

 

IMG_20190820_175154.jpg.68e1bc22ffe72aebfd49220395d993aa.jpg

 

Small amounts of Superglue have been introduced where the wires pass through the posts using an off-cut of the wire dipped in a puddle of glue.  I will leave this to dry overnight before fixing it in place on the layout but I'm beginning to think that mono-filament fishing line would give a better result rather than using the supplied wire.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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51 minutes ago, Brian D said:

.... I'm beginning to think that mono-filament fishing line would give a better result rather than using the supplied wire.

 

Regards,

Brian.

Brian,

 

Oh I don't know. A bit of 'bending' in the wires is fairly prototypical. But I do get your point that nylon wire might look better.

 

Nice video at Quorn & Woodhouse. The part where the Class 47 departs north towards Loughborough has that 'look' of a model railway. Must be the grey skies in the background. Just goes to show how good some models have become.

 

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21 hours ago, ISW said:

 

The part where the Class 47 departs north towards Loughborough has that 'look' of a model railway. Must be the grey skies in the background. Just goes to show how good some models have become.

 

 

That's exactly what I thought when I was editing the video which probably reflects the accuracy of today's ready to run offerings.  Thanks also for your interest and comments.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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The glue has set so the fence was planted in position by drilling 2.5 mm holes at the fence post positions, filling said holes with pva glue and adding some grass to tidy things up as shown.

 

IMG_20190821_174214.jpg.627e371fe00871b8c8dc7b466565fddc.jpg

 

On my travels today I acquired this mono-filament ...

 

IMG_20190821_181207.jpg.914cb4cc221641b35fe7552fb3c11a1c.jpg

 

...which is exactly the same diameter as the wire according to my micrometer.  I will experiment replacing the wire with the fishing line and let you know how I get on.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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If you keep the wire, Brian, you can use a gun bluing "pen" to turn the strands black:

 

birchwood-cierniace-pero-presto-gun-blue-pen-art.-13201-9738.jpg.16f1d950ac14db4ca08bd4b1c25a6f81.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Scott

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On 22/08/2019 at 01:54, jukebox said:

If you keep the wire, Brian, you can use a gun bluing "pen" to turn the strands black:

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/birchwood-cierniace-pero-presto-gun-blue-pen-art.-13201-9738.jpg.16f1d950ac14db4ca08bd4b1c25a6f81.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Scott

 

Thanks for the suggestion Scott but I'm not sure about painting the wires black.  Surely the wires would be galvanised to prevent corrosion so I visited the real thing about 15 minutes walk from my front door and took this pic.

 

IMG_20190822_171756.jpg.5054584cb39301d0d6ccaa764555b930.jpg

 

Although the posts are concrete and spaced at about 12 feet (48 mm in OO) the wires don't look black, they are galvanised and grey in colour and almost invisible (more about invisibility shortly).

 

Anyway, I have decided to do another trial section of fencing.  For some time I have been less than satisfied with this fence...

 

IMG_20190822_164210.jpg.ede4e6e6d21dfd71daaf33048b9fe732.jpg

 

...so using fishing line this time I have made this replacement.

 

IMG_20190822_164239.jpg.3d6e5458ad23c7bc226b32c91eb8d082.jpg

 

I had to recheck the diameter of the fishing line and the supplied kit wire but they are both the same diameter (0.22 mm) despite the fact that the fishing line looks thinner.  Anyway, holes were drilled in the base board and the fence placed in position.

 

IMG_20190822_165441.jpg.77b9b8dba0243bb439ad3f02ff10baf4.jpg

 

The fishing line, like the real thing, looks almost invisible.  So I tried a black felt tip...

 

IMG_20190822_170103.jpg.24789d4e4ac61c03daa80c52cfc4c893.jpg

 

...and then some grey paint..

 

IMG_20190822_171645.jpg.66f140f91a359abe659fca2ea5acce1a.jpg

 

...but the jury is still out.

 

What I have established doing these trial sections of fencing is that is is very difficult to drill the holes in the scenics for the fence posts in exactly the right position so that the wires appear tight-ish, as in the prototype pic above.  I am therefore minded to thread all the fence posts on the wires or fishing line loosely, dilling the holes in the scenics for the posts and planting and gluing each post as I go.  However, wire or fishing line, that is the question.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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G'Day Folks

 

I always found in Urban areas (London, where I grew up) that fencing was always, tall, either wooden planks, 6/7' foot high, or metal 'Spear' fencing, again 6'/7' tall, got to keep the urchins out somehow.........

 

manna

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That fencing is coming along well, Brian.

 

A couple of thoughts from my own trials (I make my own fencing) that may or may not help.

 

I used single aluminium(?) strands from inside a multi-strand wire - as some of my fencing runs are up to 750mm. They are very shiny, and when I installed them, they just looked wrong.  I didn't want to paint the wire, as that would thicken it. Here in Oz, over time fence wire rusts and dulls so no, not to black, but conversely they don't stay shiny for very long either. As I had the blueing pen for toning down wheels on kit built locos, and found it worked well for me - the wires become almost invisible, which sounds counter productive until you look at an actual wire fence from a typical modelling distance - the wires disappear. Just like the fence across the tracks in your photo above.   If your felt tip works just as well, that's great, and I'd advocate you going down that path.

 

As for your two other problems - unsure about your post materials (I drill out craft matchsticks for my posts, then stain them) , but I thread my posts lose onto the wires, tying off one end to the last post securely, then drop them as an "assembly" into holes pre-drilled on the baseboard, so the post spacing is even. The posts are inserted with a dab of builders glue ("Liquid Nails") that fills the hole and sets quite hard.  I come back after everything is dry, and pull the strands up tight, working from the bottom wire up, and wind them around the first/closest post.  It's only then that I darken my wires.  I found using this method the tension can be readjusted if needs be, but also that at 1:76 perfectly tensioned wires don't look "right".

 

As with all these things, it's about finding a method that works for you - and most importantly, that *you* are happy with!

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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16 hours ago, manna said:

G'Day Folks

 

I always found in Urban areas (London, where I grew up) that fencing was always, tall, either wooden planks, 6/7' foot high, or metal 'Spear' fencing, again 6'/7' tall, got to keep the urchins out somehow.........

 

manna

 

G'Day Manna,

Deneside is not really an urban layout so countrified fencing is the order of the day.  But thanks for your continuing interest in my ramblings mate.

 

16 hours ago, jukebox said:

That fencing is coming along well, Brian.

 

A couple of thoughts from my own trials (I make my own fencing) that may or may not help.

 

I used single aluminium(?) strands from inside a multi-strand wire - as some of my fencing runs are up to 750mm. They are very shiny, and when I installed them, they just looked wrong.  I didn't want to paint the wire, as that would thicken it. Here in Oz, over time fence wire rusts and dulls so no, not to black, but conversely they don't stay shiny for very long either. As I had the blueing pen for toning down wheels on kit built locos, and found it worked well for me - the wires become almost invisible, which sounds counter productive until you look at an actual wire fence from a typical modelling distance - the wires disappear. Just like the fence across the tracks in your photo above.   If your felt tip works just as well, that's great, and I'd advocate you going down that path.

 

As for your two other problems - unsure about your post materials (I drill out craft matchsticks for my posts, then stain them) , but I thread my posts lose onto the wires, tying off one end to the last post securely, then drop them as an "assembly" into holes pre-drilled on the baseboard, so the post spacing is even. The posts are inserted with a dab of builders glue ("Liquid Nails") that fills the hole and sets quite hard.  I come back after everything is dry, and pull the strands up tight, working from the bottom wire up, and wind them around the first/closest post.  It's only then that I darken my wires.  I found using this method the tension can be readjusted if needs be, but also that at 1:76 perfectly tensioned wires don't look "right".

 

As with all these things, it's about finding a method that works for you - and most importantly, that *you* are happy with!

 

Cheers

 

Scott

 

Hi Scott,

Thanks for this.  The Scale Model Scenery kit comes with timber posts already drilled and 0.22 mm diameter wire, enough of both to make a stated metre of fencing it says on the pack.  I too am faced with a long run of fencing (just under 0.7 metres).  You've probably explained it better but, yes, I too will probably plant the first post and proceed as you have described.  I think I'll use the fishing line because the fence run will have to go round a corner or two where the down line outer home bracket signal is located.  The wire in the kit, once unleashed, has turned into a bit of a birds-nest.

 

Regards to both,

Brian.

 

PS Interestingly, two gents from down under have not mentioned the cricket :D  Gentlemen indeed!

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7 hours ago, Brian D said:

 

 

 

PS Interestingly, two gents from down under have not mentioned the cricket https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_biggrin.png  Gentlemen indeed!

 

G'Day Folks

 

One does not kick someone when they are down,  unless you are worried about them getting up again, but that's not cricket.

 

manna

 

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As a nation, I'd suggest we have nothing to brag about in that department, Brian.  Why just last weekend I could swear I spotted one of our bowlers wandering the aisles at Bunnings...

 

The stain the current actors have left on that sport will rightfully last a long time.  Our friends across the ditch still remember the underarm incident - and that one wasn't even against the rules.

 

To be honest, I lost interest in the latter days of Warne & Co's tenure, when it seemed to become win-at-any-cost. That's not cricket.

 

Having said that, I have the greatest admiration for current coach and local boy Justin Langer.  Honorable gentleman, and an icon of the sport.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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Brian,

Apologies for my late note, (4 weeks of cricket umpiring at Ampleforth  must be a good excuse) but Les is correct Get Carter was film3d at BlackHall. We watched from afar ..but not far enough away to avoid being told that we should Bu$$er off and "Play somewhere else".

We very rarely visited Easington fron Horden. Mind you we could go into Casser Dene and our own beach!

 

Keep up the good work

Baz

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The approx 0.7 metre run of fencing has now been installed as per my last post.

 

IMG_20190829_133510.jpg.fa48e3db5ab5ea95b36fa3b1eef0e2c1.jpg

 

IMG_20190829_130825.jpg.83793e2ecaa86ea8eab66aa5fb803247.jpg

 

IMG_20190829_130840.jpg.f264e63b8b7ee8e98c8b6ffbc796275b.jpg

 

I have also prepared another video for your delectation or otherwise.  This one features diesels at Denesdide Colliery - see below.

 

 

That's all for now.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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That fencing of yours is ruddy good....

 

DSCF5726.JPG.cc6f18e22d20ca2c3d00c5dad019598b.JPG

 

The real stuff at Easington Colliery.

 

Les

 

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3 hours ago, Brian D said:

The approx 0.7 metre run of fencing has now been installed as per my last post.

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/IMG_20190829_133510.jpg.fa48e3db5ab5ea95b36fa3b1eef0e2c1.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/IMG_20190829_130825.jpg.83793e2ecaa86ea8eab66aa5fb803247.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/IMG_20190829_130840.jpg.f264e63b8b7ee8e98c8b6ffbc796275b.jpg

 

I have also prepared another video for your delectation or otherwise.  This one features diesels at Denesdide Colliery - see below.

 

 

That's all for now.

 

Regards,

Brian.

I enjoyed that Brian, superb mate.

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I have only a few fence posts left so I've ordered some more.  So, what to do next while I wait for the postman to deliver my fence posts? 

 

Now that "Little Easington" is substantially complete, the next area to concentrate on scenically is the colliery area which as the last video demonstrates is populated with mock ups of the various buildings and pit head made from corrugated cardboard in the main..  So I have decided to make a start on the colliery work shop building, this is the building which hides the colliery switch panel and can be seen on the left of the diesel shunter in the above YouTube link.  The mock up has been measured and a start made in TurboCAD.

 

IMG_20190830_174309.jpg.108864b97a2a4443144505ab2984fe40.jpg

 

This building is very freelance in that its main function is to hide the switch panel.  The main pit head buildings will be based loosely on those that existed at Easington Colliery back in the day.  I have found a few colour pics of the pit head and compared them with the Scalescenes swatch.  The nearest match is the "Aged Brown Brick" so I will go with that for all the buildings in the colliery area.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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Hi Brian

 

Having some buildings on the operating side of the tracks is a great idea.  I really like the views in both directions where the sidings split under the load-out, and the tracks are hemmed in on both sides.  I'm sure once you have that area detailed, it will make for some great photo opportunities.  And the view looking back up to the terrace houses from there is just as good.

 

Coming together very nicely.

 

Cheers

 

Scott

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I've made some progress with the colliery "work shop" building.  The front wall, which took several hours to build, is complete...

 

IMG_20190901_172417.jpg.be880c1d9f171fdaf30c32712887f132.jpg

 

...and corresponds to this position on the mock up.

 

IMG_20190901_172507.jpg.0fe6679f13aaf778df082b4ede4e1616.jpg

 

The outer side walls, which take about five minutes to build, have also been completed.

 

IMG_20190901_175056.jpg.a8e2d9343f92e2eb069ca9538f0eac21.jpg

 

The techniques, brick papers and windows are all "Scalescenes".

 

Regards,

Brian.

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Brian,

 

The building is starting to look good. What's your plan to 'hide' the seam / joint at the corner of the walls? I use a similar construction method [1], so any ideas or tricks are welcome. 

 

[1] - However, I print my own brick paper to save some money, allow more variety / control, and to let me include some 'weathering' in the printing (usually to darken those bricks closer to the ground).

 

 

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15 hours ago, ISW said:

Brian,

 

The building is starting to look good. What's your plan to 'hide' the seam / joint at the corner of the walls? I use a similar construction method [1], so any ideas or tricks are welcome. 

 

[1] - However, I print my own brick paper to save some money, allow more variety / control, and to let me include some 'weathering' in the printing (usually to darken those bricks closer to the ground).

 

 

 

Thanks for your comments and interest ISW.  I'm doing some more work on the building this afternoon so I'll post some more pics later which should answer your corner query but all of the brickwork, lintels, etc are Scalescenes down load sheets (or parts of their kits) printed on plane paper with my Canon inkjet printer.  The windows are also Scalescenes but printed on over head projector slides.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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The end walls comprise of two layers of card - the outer 2 mm thick layer is covered with "Aged Brown Brick" brick paper, the inner 1 mm thick layer is covered with "Painted Brickwork" brick paper with a small 1.5 mm rectangular front extension which is covered in "Down Pipe" texture from one of the Scalescenes' kits I have down loaded.  The two layers are glued together and then glued at right angles to the front wall, the down pipe section protruding by 1.5 mm - see below.

 

IMG_20190902_141629.jpg.58042c0614256605a0767088a31d5f36.jpg

 

IMG_20190902_142309.jpg.b8f1c0025b3bce314bf1b5c46938ca18.jpg

 

IMG_20190902_142319.jpg.c3933ac2351992b76def0dceba551ae0.jpg

 

I subsequently made up a gutter/eaves soffit piece and simply blacked up the exposed parts with felt tip.

 

IMG_20190902_144327.jpg.d2a6a4221faef5fa3d2640bc9a125965.jpg

 

This piece was glued to the top of the wall, the front edge in line with the down pipes and the roof added.

 

IMG_20190902_175345.jpg.b0ea7a902f6ef553fde1d8bd42ed0272.jpg

 

The building is incomplete because the end section needs to be added but I have posed it here on the layout to see how it looks.

 

IMG_20190902_175515.jpg.f91a37c21a04868eaeccadb2453f320b.jpg

 

IMG_20190902_175529.jpg.1174e3ee278da4900c7205fb6f6c00c0.jpg

 

IMG_20190902_175712.jpg.2a6b7c7166f31c63fa33b2850615e10f.jpg

 

IMG_20190902_175855.jpg.8dee8e1ad5f4e7a30c0f73a04bb770c8.jpg

 

The fence posts have arrived in today's post but I will probably carry on with this building tomorrow to get it finished.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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20 hours ago, Brian D said:

 

Thanks for your comments and interest ISW.  I'm doing some more work on the building this afternoon so I'll post some more pics later which should answer your corner query but all of the brickwork, lintels, etc are Scalescenes down load sheets (or parts of their kits) printed on plane paper with my Canon inkjet printer.  The windows are also Scalescenes but printed on over head projector slides.

 

Regards,

Brian.

Brian,

 

Thanks for the clarification and your subsequent posting. Neat idea for the downpipe to 'hide' the joint. Previously I'd attached a length of black wire as the downpipe after the walls were complete. Your method is a lot more permanent though.

 

Do you weather the outside of the building afterwards? I understand that it is possible to spray the model with matt clear (to seal in the inkjet ink) and then add weathering. Not something I've tried yet.

 

I'm also using a Canon inkjet printer, but as it was bought in the Far East I can't get replacement cartridges in this country. I therefore have to refill the old ones and reset the chip on the cartridge to 'fool' the printer into accepting it as a new full one. I'm using Canon ink and, so far, had no problems.

 

Ian

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8 hours ago, ISW said:

Brian,

 

Thanks for the clarification and your subsequent posting. Neat idea for the downpipe to 'hide' the joint. Previously I'd attached a length of black wire as the downpipe after the walls were complete. Your method is a lot more permanent though.

 

Do you weather the outside of the building afterwards? I understand that it is possible to spray the model with matt clear (to seal in the inkjet ink) and then add weathering. Not something I've tried yet.

 

I'm also using a Canon inkjet printer, but as it was bought in the Far East I can't get replacement cartridges in this country. I therefore have to refill the old ones and reset the chip on the cartridge to 'fool' the printer into accepting it as a new full one. I'm using Canon ink and, so far, had no problems.

 

Ian

 

Hi Ian,

Thanks for your further comments.  In answer to your query about weathering, no I haven't weathered any of the structures on Deneside yet but I have a packet of art pastels stashed away for that purpose but you could argue that the Scalescenes "Aged Brick" textures don't need it.  Neither have I sealed the structures with varnish - the layout is in a shed with two north facing windows fitted with roller blinds so when I'm not in there it is quite dark even during the day so I don't really feel the need to protect the printed textures from sun bleaching/fading.  All of the structures are now only faced with plain printer paper whereon the textures have been printed.  If you read back far enough in this thread you will see that I had a very unfortunate experience with some cheap photo paper which I used on the retaining walls at the rear of Deneside station, a station building and the platform side stone texture.  All had to be replaced or recovered because, over time, they turned from stone ashlar colour to pink, I think the stuff was still developing!

Printers I find are a nightmare.  The last one I had was a multi cartridge Epson which could also print directly on to CDs and DVDs (a facility I particularly wanted because I like to make and edit videos for family events and heritage railway visits, model railways etc).  However, it didn't like cheap non-Epson cartridges and died about 12 months after the warranty expired.  My current Canon also has multi cartridges and the CD/DVD direct print facility but this stopped working just after the warranty expired so I am just putting cheap (£3 instead of £13 a throw) cartridges in it until it dies.  Both of these printers cost over £100 so I have decided to just buy the cheapest printer going in the local supermarket next time and feed it cheap ink from the start.

One thing I would say is print everything you need for a project or kit straight away.  If you look closely, the different terraced house structures in "Little Easington", despite being faced with the same Scalescenes texture are slightly different in hue to the point I can notice it, others might not.  This is all because the textures for each structure were printed using different printers or cartridge brands.

But you probably knew all this already, I'll shut up now.

 

Thanks again for your interest.

 

Regards,

Brian.

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