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john new

York Show 2015

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Which trader (on one of the Mezzanine floors) was selling foam inserts to convert Really Useful Boxes into something more useful (i.e. stock-boxes)?

 

I really enjoyed this year's show - probably one of the best for some years.

 

I agree with the comments about slow (or non-existant) running on Diesels in the Duchy. It's an outstanding layout but I assumed the lack of movement was down to electical problem. I'm sure when I've seen it in the past there have been regular trains running past in addition to shunting locos around the depot. Hopefully there will be a bit more movement at Showcase next month.

 

Happy modelling.

 

Steven B.

 

I suspect the trader in question was as below

 

WEALISTIC MODELS

67 Woodlands Avenue,   Woodley, Berkshire , RG5 3HF

Telephone: 0118 9616471

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I suspect the trader in question was as below

 

WEALISTIC MODELS

67 Woodlands Avenue,   Woodley, Berkshire , RG5 3HF

Telephone: 0118 9616471

I would doubt that as they weren't at York :scratchhead:

 

The correct answer has already been given - Ten Commandments...

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...............Now before you all start I've be criticized slaged of in all 3 roles, some people do go to shows to see movement others snails pace under speed shunting the hobby is what ever floats your boat I suppose but its those that pay at the door that keep the shows going so that's something layout operators should think of as we are in the entertainment business.

 

 

Exhibition managers have to try to cater for most if they can so not every layouts going to be what you want to see but that's life.

 

Regards Arran   

 

 

...........If people come along, see a very nice layout but nothing much seems to be happening on it and they go away disappointed, we have failed. They may not come again.

 

Even on a simple shunting plank it is possible to make it entertaining by having a laugh and a chat with the people viewing. I have one layout that has the grand total of two points on scene that has had people watching for nearly 30 minutes, usually by getting youngsters in the crowd to choose which truck goes where.

 

It is not difficult and quite frankly, if people see exhibiting as a boring chore that they don't enjoy, then it is time for them to pack it in. It is too much like hard work to do it if you don't really enjoy it and don't get real pleasure from it.

 

If the paying punters don't come, there is no show and all our wonderful exhibition only layouts (those that never get set up at home because of space or lack of operating interest) might as well go in the nearest skip because nobody would ever see them.

 

 

As a 'punter' and an exhibitor the most important thing for me is to see movement.  As a punter I want to see movement to keep my interest, as an exhibitor I keep things moving to keep the visitors interested.  Its also very important for the exhibitor to converse with the visitors if prompted, and sometimes even if not prompted because some visitors are too shy to ask questions. 

 

I usually find that the star layouts of exhibitions have nothing running and are manned by a team who look like they would rather be anywhere else, or have terrible chips on their shoulders.  Usually these layouts have very few people in front of them.  As a contrast, one of the best layouts on the Scottish circuit is Hazelbank, there is always something moving, the standard of modelling is incredible and you could not meet a friendlier bunch of operators.  As a consquence, this layout is always mobbed.

 

Exhibiting shouldnt be treated as a chore, its an honour to be invited to an exhibition, especially as the organisers are paying expenses for fuel and accommodation, and in the majority of cases, catering.  If you see exhibiting as a chore then you really must have a think about what you are doing.  I personally love it, the layouts I operate are operated in a prototypical manner except that things are kept moving, not at trainset speeds, and not at so-called scale speeds, but at speeds that seem right for the type of layout. 

 

I really enjoy exhibiting in places I've never been and would likely never go otherwise, I really enjoy meeting modellers from all parts of the country (and Europe) and I really enjoy chatting to visitors who have paid money to come to the exhibition, and are spending money at the traders, keeping the hobby alive.

 

At the Preston show recently, I was chatting to a visitor who was showing me photo's of his home layout which far surpassed any of the layouts at the show.  This gent was very humble and genuinely appreciative of my comments - I regularly keep in touch with him and will be using some of his modelling methods in my next layout.

 

At the end of a day, this is a hobby, where it should be enjoyed no matter what side of the barrier you are on.

 

 

All exhibition managers have an unenviable task of selecting layouts to please all their visitors.  Those who have criticised certain layouts in this forum are both right & wrong at the same time.  What you have to remember is that about 70% of exhibition visitors are average modellers or families just wanting a day out for entertainment.  The average modeller is probably not interested in the exact scale reproduction of certain features of a location such as buildings or ultra low speed running but can appreciate the hard work & skill that made them.  Most of them want a good mix of both the layout atmosphere & more important (in my opinion) actual movement, not at train set speeds but realistic ones.

 

Exhibition layouts can probably be split into three sections, irrespective of scale.

 

  1. Superb detail, prototype movements for the serious modeller & enough movement to keep families & the average modeller entertained (eg The Gresley Beat & Copenhagen Fields).
  2. Layouts representing real locations where almost everything is scratchbuilt & movements to match (eg Leicester South & Bath Green Park).
  3. Layouts to provide interest & movement for the average modeller & entertainment for families on a day out.

 

The key to all layouts is movement to hold the visitors attention.  Once they have studied the actual layout & if there is no movement, many quickly move on.  One iconic layout where almost everything is scratchbuilt  is over 35ft long & the few times I have seen it, they seem to have only one train slowly making its way from one end to the other when there are many sidings & a large engine shed in the central part with nothing happening.  What’s wrong with that you say - but one movement on a layout of that size?  Yes we know this happened in real life but paying visitors want to be entertained & see movement on a layout of this size, especially children if we want to encourage them to take up the hobby.

 

My 00 gauge layout ‘Crewlisle’ falls into the last category.  Crewlisle is on three interconnected levels representing the WCML from 1955 to 1985 & is only 2.6M x 2.3M.  The high level comprises a terminus for 6 coach expresses, steam/diesel sheds & goods yard; mid section the WCML with OLE; low level is the reversing loop with a cassette exchange system in lieu of a fiddle yard as part of it.  I am the first to admit it is not prototypical in all movements or stock & that most of the scenery is bought from the usual manufacturers (terminus platform canopies, loco shed water tank & OLE catenary are scratchbuilt), but it is run at realistic speeds.

 

I would be a rich man if I had £1 for the number of visitors at exhibitions who said that it was nice to see something moving!   We always run a minimum of two but sometimes as many as four trains simultaneously & where possible allow children to have a go.  It entertains the average modeller & families.  That is probably the reason why it has been invited back to the NEC later this year for the fifth time.

Edited by Crewlisle

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