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Siberian Snooper

The Russian answer to level crossing accidents

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Reminds me of the old Scalextric "blow out" track, where a button (this well before Jensen's time!) operated a flap in the opponent's section of road.  If timed correctly their car would be flipped off the track.

 

Otherwise I think it's a great idea, which might save lives and suitably teach a few bad drtivers in this country!

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I don't know how to show it here but there is a short film on Facebook of these barriers in action. They collapse when hit by anything leaving the crossing but can do considerable damage to cars and even lorries approaching from the 'outside' of the crossing.

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I've seen such barriers in use on the exit lanes of car parks in the UK; the car park at the former Eurotunnel (now Saga) offices in Cheriton had them. They do cause significant damage if you use them 'wrong line', as more than one person found out. In that sort of use, they stay permanently in the raised position, and so don't need any sort of operating mechanism. I can't understand why the Russian example has them on both sides of the road, as it seems to defeat the object, which is surely to stop vehicles 'slaloming' around closed barriers.

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I suppose ramps on both lanes of the road is a precaution against someone ploughing straight through the barrier with their eyes shut or something.

Just noticed they have red reflectors on the edge of the ramps.

Edited by eastwestdivide

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Having watched some of the YouTube videos of driving in Russia, I'm surprised they don't have more than one set and spread them along the verges as well.

 

Good idea, though.  I expect they'll be marginally cheaper to fit then building bridges everywhere would have been.

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Give it a couple of months and there will doubtless be some dashboard camera footage from within a now wrecked vehicle as it flies (rotating through fully inverted) over the railway lines.

 

The real trouble with this method is going to be maintenance in below zero temperatures, especially with snow. Unless it is fitted with powerful heaters, time to immovably clogged (and not necessarily in the neatly closed position!) will be short.

 

I shall be watching with interest in our considerably milder climate, how local 'rising bollards' that control access to a bus only route, perform in snow. Any snow, and not just the famous 'wrong type'...

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I can't understand why the Russian example has them on both sides of the road, as it seems to defeat the object, which is surely to stop vehicles 'slaloming' around closed barriers.

I'd hazard a guess that these may come up before the boom gate closes, to prevent anyone gunning it to beat the barrier. Hence having one going with the flow of traffic, as well as against it.

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What on earth is going on there? Why do the pedestrians stand on the ramps, why is the BMW on the wrong side if the road?. Bizarre.

 

Anyway, looks like they work!!

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Let's hope they appear in the UK soon not sure how you would stop pedestrians with headphones or the Lycra loonies!

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What on earth is going on there? Why do the pedestrians stand on the ramps, why is the BMW on the wrong side if the road?. Bizarre.

 

Anyway, looks like they work!!

As the images are taken from inside a stationary vehicle on the 'right' side of the road, he's presumably overtaken it, and gone on to the 'wrong' side. As to why the pedestrians are standing on the ramps; it looks as though there's some sort of malfunction that means that lights and barriers open to road  traffic, then close again without a train passing- would this also affect the ramp mechanism?

They do exist in the UK (though not on level crossings); though they don't open as much as the ones in the video, it's certainly enough to wreck the front valance, and possibly the steering.

Edited by Fat Controller

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Why are people standing on the ramps ?

.

They are Russian - they do it, bcause they can !

Edited by br2975

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Here's a few vehicles getting caught on rising bus lane bollards in Manchester.

 

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These in road barriers certainly do the business, the sooner we get them here the sooner there will be less disruption to rail traffic. If they could be adapted to stop bridge strikes this would be even better.

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They could be connected to the vehicle height detectors such as we have locally (Swaythling Arch). Unfortunately these frequently malfunction and show the warning message continuously. Not a problem (i.e. it's fail-safe) until you add the raised barriers, which would stay up continuously....

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 Motorcyclist versus Russian crossing .

 

 Ramp 1 -  Motorcyclist  Ouch .

 

Interesting train as well.

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Didn't there used to be a similar ramp on the season ticket holders car park at Didcot?

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I have just received an email with this picture in.

 

attachicon.gifRussin level xing.PNG

 

I think this would be a suitable deterrent to any vehicle trying to beat the train at a level crossing.

 

Can't see it deterring a cyclist.

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Can't see it deterring a cyclist.

 

Or ambulance-chasing lawyers :no:

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I've stood on a rising bollard, just to see what it would do. It rose about a foot and then stopped and wouldn't go down again...

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why is the BMW on the wrong side if the road?. Bizarre.

It's a bmw, what else?

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Interesting train as well.

There used to be lots of these little draisines all over the former Soviet empire - a kind of utility vehicle, like a pick-up on rails.

 

post-10122-0-74381000-1413844936_thumb.jpg

 

What on earth is going on there? Why do the pedestrians stand on the ramps, why is the BMW on the wrong side if the road?. Bizarre.

Anyway, looks like they work!!

Despite getting injured, the "leader" of that little group and his mates seem to think it a big joke and walk off camera grinning all over their faces.  Whether on not the mechanism was broken, it wouldn't surprise me if this is a regular stunt they pull for impatient drivers - with similar resuts.  They can also be seen playing with the barrier, while the lights remain flashing and the opposite barrier stays down.

 

Towards the end of the clip another train is seen approaching with people spread all over the crossing.- thankfully the train is travelling slowly!

Edited by EddieB
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Can't see it deterring a cyclist.

I suppose that a train running over a cyclist, although not good for the cyclist or traincrew, is less likely to derail the train, rather than a car or larger.

 

Cheers,

Mick

 

p.s. hope this doesn't descend into another bad pedestrian/cycist thread

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