Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I have found a solution to replicating straw as packing for wagon loads. My old shaving brush. No longer will I need to ask blonde maidens for a lock of their hair.

The results will be seen as a load in the 2 plank wagon which is still in the system.

Richard

 

Great idea.  Unfortunately, my old shaving brush is my current shaving brush.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Great idea.  Unfortunately, my old shaving brush is my current shaving brush.

You obviously buy better shaving brushes than me, as mine fall apart after only 10 years of useful service

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress report

post-23520-0-73651900-1470847234_thumb.jpg

post-23520-0-07323400-1470847256_thumb.jpg

The Cambrian wagon has had the ropes fitted to the tarpaulin and dusted over with powders to mute and blend in the colours.

The ex LDEC weltrol has had the bi plane fitted as a load. I decided to sheet over the cockpit. It looks effective to me, it was loo paper with washes of brown and black.

The road van is bringing up the back of this ensemble it is up to transfers, but those will be done in a mammoth session once I have cleared my desk of all the building and painting.

Richard

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just reminded me. Came across a picture of a WD brake in Met livery. The thing is, it still has WD markings as well as MET. Looks as if it wasn't repainted, just had MET and the new number added.

 

Not that this greatly helps in this case unless you fancy a MET van. The photo is in Southern Wagons Pictorial by Mike King, page 46. The same page has one in LNER livery, but it is ex-GE, said to have gone there in 1922,

Edited by Poggy1165

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just reminded me. Came across a picture of a WD brake in Met livery. The thing is, it still has WD markings as well as MET. Looks as if it wasn't repainted, just had MET and the new number added.

 

Not that this greatly helps in this case unless you fancy a MET van. The photo is in Southern Wagons Pictorial by Mike King, page 46. The same page has one in LNER livery, but it is ex-GE, said to have gone there in 1922,

That would be a fun style of paint job, where were all the markings place, the W and the D, did it have the arrow? Etc. I am trying to remember what Andy's looked like when he did a WD version for his layout.

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coal wagon loaded

post-23520-0-30999600-1470924608_thumb.jpg

It looks better as the interior did not look right without the back of the door detail.

It did have a slight lean to port as the sailors might say, I have in a very Heath Robinson sort of way tried to rectify it by putting the weight in it with a bias to the starboard side. I can not see why it wanted to lean over but after some strong words and the extra burden glued under it, it is now starting to behave.

Now got to build the load of a steam traction engine for the other lomac and then all the 9 carriages and wagons will go into the works for transfers. I seem to build in 9s as that is the length of train my "temporary" fiddle yard will take. I say temporary, it has now been in place for ten years, but the aim is....

Like every one there is the bigger master plan

Richard

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be a fun style of paint job, where were all the markings place, the W and the D, did it have the arrow? Etc. I am trying to remember what Andy's looked like when he did a WD version for his layout.

Richard

The WD is high up, top left, top plank, and it looks like a little arrow between the letters, but it's quite small and the print not sharp.

 

I was sort of amused at such casual painting but then again, when I think about it, at around this time the GC was sending out (some) locos with no lettering on the tenders, and with sundry other anomalies, because it was more important to get the engine on the road than do a perfect paint job.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enjoying the continued progress, and I really like the biplane, a great feature and very convincingly done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The WD is high up, top left, top plank, and it looks like a little arrow between the letters, but it's quite small and the print not sharp.

 

I was sort of amused at such casual painting but then again, when I think about it, at around this time the GC was sending out (some) locos with no lettering on the tenders, and with sundry other anomalies, because it was more important to get the engine on the road than do a perfect paint job.

And in grey primer which I should really model to ring the changes

Thank you for the livery description

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enjoying the continued progress, and I really like the biplane, a great feature and very convincingly done.

That is kind, the rest is on a flatrol it will run in the WW1 train. That now has just the carriage for the troops to be built up from a 3d print

Richard

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Richard

 

The bogie wagon does look better loaded.

 

 

 

 

 

Cor I wish I had the guts to say "Told you so"!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Richard

 

The bogie wagon does look better loaded.

 

 

 

 

 

Cor I wish I had the guts to say "Told you so"!!!!!!

It was the lack of internal detail which made the eye tell you something was missing. Next time I will have to do the doors properly, inside and out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress has been slower still. I have been teaching my six year old to solder and paint, here is the result.

post-23520-0-39895900-1472388889_thumb.jpg

He did the joins and started the cleaning up. I finished that. He did the primer and main colour. I did the painting detail. I then chained it to the wagon.

The roof is in the foreground and I can not decide if that should be another wagon load.

Just the pipe load for the 2 plank and then it is on to the transfers for the nine pieces of stock. Anyone would think I was putting off that part of the process.

Richard

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress has been slower still. I have been teaching my six year old to solder and paint, here is the result.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

He did the joins and started the cleaning up. I finished that. He did the primer and main colour. I did the painting detail. I then chained it to the wagon.

The roof is in the foreground and I can not decide if that should be another wagon load.

Just the pipe load for the 2 plank and then it is on to the transfers for the nine pieces of stock. Anyone would think I was putting off that part of the process.

Richard

 

Excellent. I like the traction engine load, what model is it? Really looks the part and represents the sheer variety no doubt to be seen when more or less everything went via rail.

 

For my part, I have now acquired a Dapol Lowmac, so a GER MacK will follow at some point. 

As I plan to have an agricultural contractors based at Castle Aching, I am thinking of loading mine with a portable steam engine to be delivered to them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The steam tractor is a scale link one, they are still trading if you want to pick one up. However, I found mine at a swap meet here in the USA. Who would have thought. It was the only 4mm stuff for sale in the whole show. My lomac will be done as an LDECR one . I may have to second guess the lettering from images of one of their 5 planks which came into GCR stock.

Richard

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traction engines being transported from Ransomes' :

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24206337434/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

Another load, they look like horse wagons on railway wagons:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24716658692/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

All on the Great Eastern at Ipswich

 

Brilliant photographs.  part of my thinking was that they are a number of manufacturers of agricultural machinery in GE territory, so the Mac K with its steam engine could go anywhere.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traction engines being transported from Ransomes' :

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24206337434/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

Another load, they look like horse wagons on railway wagons:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24716658692/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

All on the Great Eastern at Ipswich

Hi Simon

 

The loads in the second photo are British Army MkX GS Wagons. http://scratchbuiltarmour.blogspot.co.uk/2014_02_01_archive.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traction engines being transported from Ransomes' :

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24206337434/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

Another load, they look like horse wagons on railway wagons:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/imt_image_archive/24716658692/in/album-72157663756160010/

 

All on the Great Eastern at Ipswich

The chaining is close, but now do I rig a tarpaulin ? It would need the company logo on and would cover up the paint job, I am tempted to weather it slightly and have it on a transfer between two owners who did not cover it.

Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The three plank now has its load

post-23520-0-18821600-1472581701_thumb.jpg

Clay pipes to sort out the sewers in an expanding industrial town. Pipes are the clips that turn narrow glow sticks into circles. If you turn the made in China to the bottom you are left with a number stamp on top. Different for each pipe. The straw is old shaving brush hair. Recycling at its finest.

The batch build progresses, I might clear the wagons by doing their transfers and couplings and come back to the coach glazing which I find very tedious.

Richard

That photo has shown up how much there is to do to the cars to bring them up to standard.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The three plank now has its load

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Clay pipes to sort out the sewers in an expanding industrial town. Pipes are the clips that turn narrow glow sticks into circles. If you turn the made in China to the bottom you are left with a number stamp on top. Different for each pipe. The straw is old shaving brush hair. Recycling at its finest.

The batch build progresses, I might clear the wagons by doing their transfers and couplings and come back to the coach glazing which I find very tedious.

Richard

That photo has shown up how much there is to do to the cars to bring them up to standard.

 

A great load.  That is the fun of modelling, when skill, inventiveness and originality come together in a convincing way.

 

Unfortunately, my shaving brush is still showing no signs of wearing out!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Progress has been slower still. I have been teaching my six year old to solder and paint, here is the result.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

He did the joins and started the cleaning up. I finished that. He did the primer and main colour. I did the painting detail. I then chained it to the wagon.

The roof is in the foreground and I can not decide if that should be another wagon load.

Just the pipe load for the 2 plank and then it is on to the transfers for the nine pieces of stock. Anyone would think I was putting off that part of the process.

Richard

 

Richard,

Could I borrow your six year old to teach me how to solder and paint like that please?  I think it looks brilliant.  I wish I had had someone to teach me things like that when I was six.  Excellent, and well done both of you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Richard,

Could I borrow your six year old to teach me how to solder and paint like that please?  I think it looks brilliant.  I wish I had had someone to teach me things like that when I was six.  Excellent, and well done both of you.

He is available to give lessons, his rates are two jammy dodgers a session.

It is just the matter of getting to the USA for each session which might not make it a viable option.

Richard

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wagons are complete

post-23520-0-90839500-1472927652_thumb.jpg

First up the thirty ton bogie coal wagon. Transfers done, no two photos found showed the same layout of wording on the side of the wagon.

post-23520-0-63056000-1472927812_thumb.jpg

Then the pipes being transported. Dragon model dry transfers used which shows up plank detail nicely.

 

post-23520-0-92560500-1472927903_thumb.jpg

With its roof in the fore ground removed for transport. The wagon for that needs completing. It is labelled up as LDEC as they originally got this type if lomac. Named after a mentor of mine, not sure what his company works on but it certainly needs a steam tractor.

 

post-23520-0-43178300-1472928043_thumb.jpg

The other is labelled as taken over by the great central.

 

post-23520-0-32666200-1472928226_thumb.jpg

Lastly the road van. I decided to GCR it as it is in the southern book as such. It adds to the variation. I know the debate will still rage over if it is correct but I feel that we will never get conclusive proof one way or the other. That and brake vans and loco should match and I don't have a war department loco to run with it.

Now to finish the horse box and carriages.

Richard

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wagons are complete

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

First up the thirty ton bogie coal wagon. Transfers done, no two photos found showed the same layout of wording on the side of the wagon.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Then the pipes being transported. Dragon model dry transfers used which shows up plank detail nicely.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

With its roof in the fore ground removed for transport. The wagon for that needs completing. It is labelled up as LDEC as they originally got this type if lomac. Named after a mentor of mine, not sure what his company works on but it certainly needs a steam tractor.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

The other is labelled as taken over by the great central.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Lastly the road van. I decided to GCR it as it is in the southern book as such. It adds to the variation. I know the debate will still rage over if it is correct but I feel that we will never get conclusive proof one way or the other. That and brake vans and loco should match and I don't have a war department loco to run with it.

Now to finish the horse box and carriages.

Richard

 

All very nicely done.  The subtle weathering is very effective.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.