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Kirley's Workbench

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13 hours ago, pat141 said:

Found these pictures on the web, they might be useful. 

 

Thank Pat, had not seen the second picture clearly showing the container, which contained ballast, and was used as a barrier wagon.

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Posted (edited)

Midland Great Western 6-Wheel Coaches (CIE livery) 1st Class Saloon & Brake 3rd (Branch Line).

 

Found Ernie Shepherd's book 'Midland Great Western Railway Of Ireland which was of great help. Any idea what colour the under frame was painted?

 

IMG_8405x.jpg.c1b9e5457ced78b75bba8ab3b78547a6.jpg

IMG_8406x.jpg.fc61105b7890bad904b1c183dcd80770.jpg

 

IMG_8409x.jpg.732569bc02c59f6185d01bb98d5fee8a.jpg

 

Edited by kirley
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I’d go for a weathered black myself - maybe hint at weathered wood on

the footboards?! Are you compensating any of the axles? 

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Posted (edited)

It’s wagon / goods underframes that were never black (albeit with a few exceptions, eg CDRJC). Carriages, and non-passenger stock used only, or primarily, in passenger trains, like NCC “brown vans” or many horse boxes, had black chassis.

 

In the CIE green era, coach ends were black as well, and carriage roofs were sometimes (usually) black, but could also be dark grey.

 

That’s a very neat model!

Edited by jhb171achil
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Posted (edited)

Midland Great Western 6-Wheel Coaches (CIE livery) 

Brake/3rd 11M

Lavatory 1st 39M

Coupe Composite 186M

1st Class Saloon 2M

 

Three down, one to go. 

 

IMG_8439x.jpg.dcea1fb9aaac7e822baf20c19a6eab32.jpg

 

I have replaced the strengthening card with thin plasticard.  Cutting out the windows is such a pain [excuse the pun] I change the scalpel blade twice for each coach.

 

IMG_8465x.jpg.a6101005fcc6bda416cd14e4c7e80d68.jpg

 

Scratch built the base and added the W Irons, using Bill Bedford parts.

 

IMG_8475x.jpg.c07839e49b2f841c262f0b811a8c0077.jpg

 

The centre wheel cannot be fixed to allow it to go round curves so the method used is to replace the original wheel axles with a 2 mm piece of tubing. A 1mm pinpoint axle is threaded through the tubing allowing this axle to ‘float’, that the theory anyway.

 

IMG_8477x.jpg.5130a89851ddde5a1ed70cd12d2b73ed.jpg

IMG_8479x.jpg.871ce4961a8c25e8ce327f3262c0e40f.jpg

 

Four bodies completed.

 

IMG_8481x.jpg.7067d5f70abd035b4fb7457ae822ecce.jpg

 

Supporting blocks added for the couplings.

 

IMG_8502x.jpg.8fc0eba2d9519fa222d12f08912aeac9.jpg

 

Emergency Brakes scratch built.

 

IMG_8503x.jpg.48307eea56b157a9f7e27cd22cf50dec.jpg

 

Interiors completed and roof furniture added.

 

IMG_8505x.jpg.9e6840ec550ddae35483a1c8b8d73d8f.jpg

 

On the home straight now.

Edited by kirley
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Looking nice, will they need a bit of extra weight?

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I used 1.5 plasticard for the coach floor and the same for the chassis Pat.  That plus the wheels & wheel fittings has made them a lot heavier than I was expecting. But the proof of the pudding is when I run them.  I can always add weight underneath if need be.

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Running boards on, roofs fixed and those other twiddly bits added.

IMG_8509x.jpg.c08ea9bc6eae9c84cb133c673411835f.jpg

IMG_8510x.jpg.d385f6cd048b515cdab05d22e0413dbd.jpg

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Kirley you are  a hero! and a braver man than me. I bought one of those brake van kits to do what you have done and decided  that I could not cut out the parts to satisfy myself. I did practise on one of those GSWR convertible vans; I binned it and the coach is still a set of plans!

So much kudos to yourself and take a bow!!

Keep healthy and safe and maybe say hello again at the NEC one day.

   Mick     :good:

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Thanks Mick, I can't say I'm won over to model making in card, I found cutting out the windows was difficult, the straight bits were okay but when doing the curves at the top I usually ended up tearing the card.  Then when you coloured in the white bits I found the colour bled.  I tried coating it in varnish first but it did not make a great difference.  I'll not say I'll never do another one but it might be a while.

It would be nice to meet up again, who knows where.

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13 hours ago, kirley said:

Thanks Mick, I can't say I'm won over to model making in card, I found cutting out the windows was difficult, the straight bits were okay but when doing the curves at the top I usually ended up tearing the card.  Then when you coloured in the white bits I found the colour bled.  I tried coating it in varnish first but it did not make a great difference.  I'll not say I'll never do another one but it might be a while.

It would be nice to meet up again, who knows where.


agreed Kieran, I found the same building Adelaide station building, hence the run down look!

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Posted (edited)

Nice work. I use these kits a fair bit, although generally as coloured drawings, doing the actual build with plasticard. What I have found is that frequent changes of knife blade is key to keep the cutting sharp. It’s unbelievable how quickly card blunts a Swann Morton blade! My first effort at an Irish wagon was built straight from card....

80FF13F0-929A-4C10-B170-4948086B0B76.jpeg

Edited by Irish Padre
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Nice job, but I'm thinking it must be easier in 0 gauge.

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It is a bit easier in truth. David Jenkinson’s book on carriage building is rather a useful resource too in terms of how to scratch build in plastic...

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Sperry Container Wagon.

 

A straightforward project, all you need is a C-Rail 40’ container and plenty of photographs of the real thing. I drew out a template for all the doors, grills, steps and other ‘bits’.

 

IMG_8540x.jpg.47a8d4337d0753243f7cfc70671b3b46.jpg

 

I used Evergreen to make the door frames, grills and steps along with scrap bits of plasticard.

 

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It’s now ready for a primer coat.

 

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I find that it's only when you start making a model do you notice lots of little details that you never saw  before, for example covers for cables on the front of the container, cable on the rear, boxes added to the ends of the 47' bogie wagon which was painted black.  I could go on but here is the finished Container Wagon.

 

IMG_8579x.jpg.8e8a4dbc6f5c30a0d1582099a3427e55.jpg

 

IMG_8578x.jpg.72fbb4686ee62b7e835843da921dfd31.jpg

 

IMG_8580x.jpg.7d223cdde074df835447f31c66134748.jpg

 

IMG_8584x.jpg.f9f92b93a6bf3c71b513b39ecf94f848.jpg

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Not my era, Kieran but a lovely model! I agree about the details. I’m also noticing that I’m much more aware of how the real thing worked and what all those bits and pieces are for! I’m even working out the difference between bolts and rivets, and the fact that some handrails taper...spent more time than is healthy this week focusing on a water tank filler ....

Edited by Irish Padre
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2 hours ago, Irish Padre said:

...spent more time than is healthy this week focusing on a water tank filler ....

 

You should get out more.  Oh wait.

...... ;)

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CIE Acrylonitrile Tankers.

As promised there would be a Mark II run of these.  The ends was the most difficult to fabricate so casts in resin were made of the plasticard master by Tony Ragg who even arranged transport to Kirley Junction.

 

 

 

IMG_8646x.jpg.8ca5a5aeb92a07b5358a64950765a938.jpg

 

The ladders on the ends where tedious to make but after getting the measurements sorted the rest followed the pattern.

 

IMG_8648x.jpg.8055d146a2981c1928674e747d37c6fc.jpg

 

IMG_8649x.jpg.355c5059901bb4c4a1b55e747afcb05b.jpg

 

Getting the double ribs on the tanks equally spaced was challenging until I hit on using a roll of paper to get it accurate.

 

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Five done but am waiting on more tubing to do the rest.

 

IMG_8652x.jpg.93b86ac2f5cf2ead6e36ec51f37679b3.jpg

 

Ends given a coat of primer

IMG_8656x.jpg.7b77521d6ef8a58c85ead21adebdaad8.jpg

 

I got brass walkways from A1. Models which should work out okay.

 

IMG_8659x.jpg.383cb7b35ec8a1494e0f4add4cfabc7f.jpg

 

Back to making more ends with ladders.

 

 

 

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Amazing stuff. You might sell  some if you have too many maybe?

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You're doing great work there! It will be an impressive train.

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