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LMS "ratio" plastic kit signals..


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Your 3 post bracket looks a little strange with 2 home signal arms on the same post. There were of course coacting arms on the same post for sighting reasons but this doesn't seem to be the case here?

 

Nice work all the same.

Have a look at this for arms on the same post.. 5/8/9 signal or perhaps the gantry that carries distants 28/39

 

post-4034-0-14160400-1418574846_thumb.jpg

 

Something seems amiss with the disc on the bracket however..

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The disc needs to move to the left a bit. The aperture for the light is right in the middle of the cube top top of the Ratio moulding. The representation on the lenses on the face should be positioned accordingly. These signals are also 'lower quadrant' too.

 

post-4034-0-21890100-1418577745_thumb.jpg

Edited by LNERGE
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Have a look at this for arms on the same post.. 5/8/9 signal or perhaps the gantry that carries distants 28/39

 

attachicon.gifFinsbury Park 5.JPG

 

Something seems amiss with the disc on the bracket however..

As you are probably aware (judging by you avatar) the LNER used small arm shunt signals arranged in much the same way as the disk signals you have also illustrated. Could this be the case at Finsbury Park? I'm sure it would be unusual to have detonator equipment linked to a shunt signal but perhaps this was the case at this busy location? Perhaps it's some archaic GN installation? I'm not expert but I'm pretty sure this wouldn't have been the case on the LMS.

 

Head's now over parapet :O

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Having a number of stop signals on one post could be used at junctions on running lines in low speed areas or where sighting was poor or space limited. The top arm would apply to the left hand route and so on down the arm. I can't think of any extant examples off the top of my head, but Firsby in East Lincolnshire had one such signal as a starter from its bay platform. The top arm was for the Skegness branch and the lower for the main line towards Boston.

DSCN0209.jpg

Above is an example for my layout - the right hand post, partially hidden behind a colour light, is a platform starter. The top arm goes through the crossover and the first slip onto the main line while the lower arm indicates straight on into the branch. There's a disc at the foot of the signal controlling access into the sidings on the far left of the board.

The same convention applies using short arm shunting signals, or discs - top arm, or disc, for the left hand route etc.

Hope that helps.

Good work with the signals, I can never get enough of modern trains with semaphores.

Cheers,

Ben.

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  • RMweb Gold

I've had a quick search but found nothing but i'm sure there was something fairly big at the north end of Preston station that had lots of arms on one post?

 

Preston No.5 up and down signals there were also a couple at the South end controlled by Preston No.1 and No.2A

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  • RMweb Gold

This samphore with ground signal on platform i copyed from some pictures I had of them.

Ile find them and post them up :mail:

 

The LMS also had a habit of using ex LNWR miniature armed shunts when they were required to be on the main structure.

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  • RMweb Gold

That's interesting... so if found in a low speed areas it does raise the question why they were linked to detonators at Finsbury Park. 

There was a detonator placer linked with the Down Home from the WR at Bordesley Junction when we converted the chord to a passenger line in 1966. It was there because the box could give Line Clear to Bordesley South with a train crossing the junction which was less than 440 yards ahead. It was only about 20mph on the approach and on a rising gradient.

I have a vague memory of a detonator placer associated with a colour light signal, I think it may have been on the Up line approaching Plymouth. Can anyone confirm?

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  • RMweb Gold

There was a detonator placer linked with the Down Home from the WR at Bordesley Junction when we converted the chord to a passenger line in 1966. It was there because the box could give Line Clear to Bordesley South with a train crossing the junction which was less than 440 yards ahead. It was only about 20mph on the approach and on a rising gradient.

I have a vague memory of a detonator placer associated with a colour light signal, I think it may have been on the Up line approaching Plymouth. Can anyone confirm?

There might have been at Plymouth but I can't be certain.  However the North Eastern Region definitely installed detonator placers in some of their colour light signalling schemes although they were effectively 'one shot' devices as they used a standard Westinghouse signal motor (or 'backing machine' as it was called in Reading works).

 

Three shot placers could be found at a number of placers on the GWR/WR and were basically installed in places where there was a potential SPAD risk emerging (I think in nearly all cases) from a platform line including bays.  I have a  complete list of all the early installations and the reason for providing them - but it is pre 1914.

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Ive also come across this picture and info in my signal book.

 

But the "best" information for (samphore signals) is from you chaps on here :read: :good:

So big thank you to all for your super information...

 

Cheers neil..

post-10160-0-30225900-1418615306_thumb.jpg

post-10160-0-92233600-1418615344_thumb.jpg

Edited by class"66"
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  • RMweb Gold

There might have been at Plymouth but I can't be certain.  However the North Eastern Region definitely installed detonator placers in some of their colour light signalling schemes although they were effectively 'one shot' devices as they used a standard Westinghouse signal motor (or 'backing machine' as it was called in Reading works).

 

Three shot placers could be found at a number of placers on the GWR/WR and were basically installed in places where there was a potential SPAD risk emerging (I think in nearly all cases) from a platform line including bays.  I have a  complete list of all the early installations and the reason for providing them - but it is pre 1914.

I've found the reference to the ones at Plymouth, they were Clayton machines worked from the panel at Cornwall Loop Junction. See page 16 of this notice http://www.signallingnotices.org.uk/scans/559/B%201165.pdf

 

Royal Albert Bridge and Saltash boxes had three-shot machines put in when the Token working  across the RAB was taken out in 1961. These were moved on and off the track by the rodding controlling the points at the ends of the single line. http://www.signallingnotices.org.uk/scans/3881/B%201181%20Royal%20Albert%20Bridge%20&%20Saltash%201961.pdf

Edited by TheSignalEngineer
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  • RMweb Gold

<pedant>

 

Swap the two small arms around and it's fine.

 

The horizontal striped arm is either call on, shunt ahead or Warning - it's always used in connection with a main arm, so on your signal should be on the right or middle doll.

 

The miniature arm on the right hand doll is correct but more unusual (although by no means uncommon) under a main arm, it would be better swapped with the left hand miniature arm.

 

<\pedant>

 

It's your signal of course.

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