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Mid-Cornwall Lines - 1950s Western Region in 00


St Enodoc
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Up to now, I've only had two brake vans branded "St Blazey", both ancient Ratio kits built and hand-lettered by me over 40 years ago. One ran with the long china-clay train and one with the short; however, since we decided a month or so ago that the short train should run with two brake vans because of the propelling move to Wheal Veronica, the long train has been running with a Hornby Par van instead.

 

Today a second-hand Bachmann St Blazey brake van, which was a Kernow limited edition, arrived from Hattons. Once I've fitted DG couplings, it can take over on the long train and the Par van will go back on to the shelf until it can be put to work on the Branch freight.

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2 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Up to now, I've only had two brake vans branded "St Blazey", both ancient Ratio kits built and hand-lettered by me over 40 years ago. One ran with the long china-clay train and one with the short; however, since we decided a month or so ago that the short train should run with two brake vans because of the propelling move to Wheal Veronica, the long train has been running with a Hornby Par van instead.

 

Today a second-hand Bachmann St Blazey brake van, which was a Kernow limited edition, arrived from Hattons. Once I've fitted DG couplings, it can take over on the long train and the Par van will go back on to the shelf until it can be put to work on the Branch freight.

 

But... do these places exist on your mid-Cornwall lines?  The Par van at least should be rebadged as Porthmellyn Road!

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31 minutes ago, Chamby said:

 

But... do these places exist on your mid-Cornwall lines?  The Par van at least should be rebadged as Porthmellyn Road!

Well, sort of...

 

Porthmellyn Road, although the track layout is based on Par, is located from an operational perspective at Burngullow, with the Pentowan branch running along the alignment of the Newquay and Cornwall Junction Railway to St Dennis Junction. The real Par and St Blazey are off to the East through Tremewan Tunnel.

 

St Blazey is still the main yard and loco depot for Mid-Cornwall so it still makes sense for the china-clay train brake vans to be allocated there. The Par van is possibly stretching it a bit, as the branch freight will run between St Blazey and Pentowan, but it's too nice a model not to use.

 

I haven't yet thought of an excuse to run the brake vans branded St Erth, Gwinear Road or Bodmin though...

 

120309047_20150119003mid-cornwalllinesmapcolourdraft3.jpg.fe4617d918a2347920a89000d76f1b4b.jpg

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It’s the converse of a single slip.

Double Slip: two straight routes; two curved routes.

Single Slip: two straight routes; one curved route.

Barry Slip: one straight route; two curved routes.

Paul.

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33 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

As someone who has only recently heard of this turnout configuration, what separates a Barry slip from the common-or-garden variety?

Was tempted to say it’s the only one named after a person . . .

Ill be off.

Paul.

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34 minutes ago, Oldddudders said:

As someone who has only recently heard of this turnout configuration, what separates a Barry slip from the common-or-garden variety?

Start here and work through the next few posts:

 

 

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1 hour ago, St Enodoc said:

Well, sort of...

 

 

I haven't yet thought of an excuse to run the brake vans branded St Erth, Gwinear Road or Bodmin though...

 

 

 

How about Truro, the other one KM produced? Very unlikely but it might have got to St Blazey on a trip from Truro yard.

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2 hours ago, Tankerman said:

 

How about Truro, the other one KM produced? Very unlikely but it might have got to St Blazey on a trip from Truro yard.

Definitely! I've got two Truro vans - one for the Truro/Tavy Junction class K and the other for the Truro/Pentowan via Polperran class K.

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4 hours ago, Oldddudders said:

As someone who has only recently heard of this turnout configuration, what separates a Barry slip from the common-or-garden variety?

I’m glad someone else asked that question as I didn’t want to show my ignorance!

 

3 hours ago, Harlequin said:

Here's a picture:

Slips.png.8fff1338241890502334e796c818fe22.png

 

Maybe Peco will make a OO Bullhead Barry slip one day. At top Peco development speed we might see it in, say 20 years... :laugh:

What’s the difference between the Barry slip and two points close together. Is it just a bit of space saving?

 

Andy

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21 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

I’m glad someone else asked that question as I didn’t want to show my ignorance!

 

What’s the difference between the Barry slip and two points close together. Is it just a bit of space saving?

 

Andy

That's exactly right, Andy. In my case, as you'll have seen from earlier in the thread, it also allows me to build the formation with a 1 in 5 angle and 30" radius. Doing that with a double slip wouldn't work as the switch tips would be too close together in 00 and also too close to the crossings to fit the isolating gap in. Because of the way Polperran will be worked, with road 10 as the headshunt for roads 1 to 5, I don't need the "missing link" between roads 1 to 5 and road 6. @Nick C's suggestion saved the day!

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26 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

I’m glad someone else asked that question as I didn’t want to show my ignorance!

 

What’s the difference between the Barry slip and two points close together. Is it just a bit of space saving?

 

Andy

That's exactly what it is, just two points heel-to-heel, but overlapped to fit them into roughly the space of one - if you think about it, that's the point of any kind of slip, a double slip is effectively the same (from an operational point of view at least) as two points toe-to-toe

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Here's a photo of a real one, in Ropley Yard on the MHR - for context, the top two roads go into the loco yard, bottom right is access, and bottom left is the carriage workshop - there's no need to have access to both roads of the loco works from the carriage works, so this save a lot of complexity (and therefore cost) over a double slip.

 

 

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37 minutes ago, Nick C said:

That's exactly what it is, just two points heel-to-heel, but overlapped to fit them into roughly the space of one - if you think about it, that's the point of any kind of slip, a double slip is effectively the same (from an operational point of view at least) as two points toe-to-toe

Sort of, but a double slip also allows straight over movement without the reverse curve. Something I think is very useful in (for example) tight station throats.

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7 hours ago, 5BarVT said:

Was tempted to say it’s the only one named after a person . . .

Ill be off.

Paul.

Yes

 

I am delighted that St Enodoc is building a slip named after me!! :jester:

 

Baz

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