Jump to content

Mid-Cornwall Lines - 1950s Western Region in 00


St Enodoc
 Share

Recommended Posts

Back in the mists of time……well about a year ago…….we were in Cornwall and I mentioned we had passed a sign for the St Enodoc hotel. I think John you asked me to get a photo of it next time we were near there. Was it just the road sign or the hotel? We will be back in Cornwall end of October.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, acg5324 said:

Back in the mists of time……well about a year ago…….we were in Cornwall and I mentioned we had passed a sign for the St Enodoc hotel. I think John you asked me to get a photo of it next time we were near there. Was it just the road sign or the hotel? We will be back in Cornwall end of October.

Thanks Andy. Carbis Bay again?

 

Wouldn't mind both if possible but if not then just the sign would be great.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

Thanks Andy. Carbis Bay again?

 

Wouldn't mind both if possible but if not then just the sign would be great.

Yes Carbis Bay. Road sign first choice and hotel if possible too.

 

We are staying at Hawkes Point again, different apartment. Got various restaurants booked for the week including lunch in Portleven at 

http://www.kotakai.co.uk on our first day……we are stopping overnight at Gloucester on the way down. It’s bad enough doing Carbis Bay to York in one go on the way home.

  • Like 2
  • Friendly/supportive 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Chamby said:

Which makes me think - is St Enodoc's Church going to feature on the layout at all?  

 

Maybe inside that curve to Wheal Veronica...  

Wait and see...

  • Like 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 3
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
1 hour ago, Chamby said:

Which makes me think - is St Enodoc's Church going to feature on the layout at all?  

 

Maybe inside that curve to Wheal Veronica...  

The perfect cameo - the church half-covered in sand, and the reverend being lowered in through the roof. Sure beats buses on bridges!

  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1
  • Round of applause 4
  • Funny 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 10/09/2021 at 09:21, St Enodoc said:

... that the intermittent "freezing" of the DCC system came back, three times. After I switched everything off for about 15 minutes all was well but I really need to find out somehow what's going wrong.

 

This happens to me and my thinking is that the DDC system simply gets confused by a very large number of instructions over a longish period, particularly if you input many commands in quick succession. Its as though its memory has a finite capacity (which being a computer it must have) and either that gets filled up or data inputs to it get misread. I always find that simply switching it off and restarting it after a few minutes clears the problem - exactly like a memory leak on a PC.

My only suggestion to overcome this is to always input instructions in a more measured manner and don't ever rush things. Don't input a command, realise its wrong and hit a rescind or cancel button repeatedly. In short treat the system gently and with respect.

  • Like 3
  • Informative/Useful 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Martin S-C said:

This happens to me and my thinking is that the DDC system simply gets confused by a very large number of instructions over a longish period, particularly if you input many commands in quick succession. Its as though its memory has a finite capacity (which being a computer it must have) and either that gets filled up or data inputs to it get misread. I always find that simply switching it off and restarting it after a few minutes clears the problem - exactly like a memory leak on a PC.

My only suggestion to overcome this is to always input instructions in a more measured manner and don't ever rush things. Don't input a command, realise its wrong and hit a rescind or cancel button repeatedly. In short treat the system gently and with respect.

Having researched this with some of the gurus, I'm now convinced that the problem is something to do with signal degradation, or noise, on the cab bus, which in my case is long and has several branches/spurs. This may well be caused, in turn, by the length and geometry of the track and accessory buses.

 

The best mitigation (not cure) is:

 

- an RC filter at the end of each zone on the track and accessory buses, furthest from the booster. I use a 10ohm 5W wire-wound resistor in series with a 0.1microfarad 50Vdc ceramic capacitor; and

 

- keeping the cab bus as straight and as far away from the track and accessory buses as is practicable.

Edited by St Enodoc
Mixing up cab, track and accessory buses
  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 6
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

All very interesting. Us direct current users place our buses on the bridge and they never cause problems. 

 

Yours

 

Ned Ludd.

 

That’s only because there’s so much other wiring under your layouts, you’d never find the bus!   :P

  • Round of applause 6
  • Funny 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
7 hours ago, Clive Mortimore said:

All very interesting. Us direct current users place our buses on the bridge and they never cause problems. 

 

Yours

 

Ned Ludd.

Yes, but being DC, it’s also safe for you to use a bridge rectifier.

  • Like 1
  • Round of applause 1
  • Funny 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Regularity said:

Yes, but being DC, it’s also safe for you to use a bridge rectifier.

Surely a bridge rectifier is only required if an overheight bus has crashed into it? :jester:

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 1
  • Funny 13
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
1 hour ago, SR Chris said:

Surely a bridge rectifier is only required if an overheight bus has crashed into it? :jester:

An excuse to roll out the Hornby-Dublo breakdown crane, then!

  • Like 7
  • Agree 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 13/09/2021 at 23:25, St Enodoc said:

Having researched this with some of the gurus, I'm now convinced that the problem is something to do with signal degradation, or noise, on the cab bus, which in my case is long and has several branches/spurs. This may well be caused, in turn, by the length and geometry of the track and accessory buses.

 

The best mitigation (not cure) is:

 

- an RC filter at the end of each zone on the track and accessory buses, furthest from the booster. I use a 10ohm 5W wire-wound resistor in series with a 0.1microfarad 50Vdc ceramic capacitor; and

 

- keeping the cab bus as straight and as far away from the track and accessory buses as is practicable.

Agree about keeping the cab bus away from track and accessory bus.  Less sure about ‘straight’, but would add cross at right angles.  Not being NCE but extrapolating from Loconet, I assume that the cab bus has to go to all controllers and mini panels.

As a possible test methodology, could you reroute the cab bus aerially so that it is nowhere near anything dirty.

Think cab bus = signalling, track bus = traction.  There is a reason why we want to keep away from your nasty dirty electrons! :-)

Paul.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
  • Interesting/Thought-provoking 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...