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The Sheep Chronicles : Chapter 5: Outwool. A pastoral corner of the Wisbleat and Upwool.......The Sheep goes East. These are the continuing adventures of Norman Lockhart, connoisseur of traditional British breakfasts and fine cream teas.


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2 hours ago, MrWolf said:

Aware also of the fact that if I change my modelmaking plans now I will get chased around the garden by a slightly unhinged giri armed with a sword?

I know blokes who pay a lot extra for that sort of thing. 

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1 hour ago, Oldddudders said:

I know blokes who pay a lot extra for that sort of thing. 

 

I thought that we weren't supposed to talk about politicians on here? :D

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

 

I thought that we weren't supposed to talk about politicians on here? :D

 

 

 

 

Politicians are fair game...politics....well that's different....

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3 hours ago, MrWolf said:

Wonderfully damp and scruffy. I like the Standard Flying Twelve too. Is that an Oxford model or similar?

 

 

Thanks Rob. 

 

Yes, thats an Oxford jobbie suitably tinkered with. 

 

Rob. 

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On 04/12/2020 at 21:19, chuffinghell said:

I can’t quite put my finger in it but you’re looking younger on your avatar, have you changed your wooldo Rob?

 

 

Thanks for noticing, Chris. Yes, I have had a little makeover. 

 

In other news, a nice chap called  Darren delivered the replacement J70 this afternoon. 

 

It is now running in on the dining table. 

 

The Wisbleat and Upwool project is up and running again.....ish. 

 

Rob. 

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Well, its better. But......................there's a tight spot.

And.......there is so little clearance between the crank pins, the slide bars and the side sheets that they can rub and mine do. I need to gently ease out the side sheets but I'm prepared to remove the slide bars and connecting rods. I mean, we don't see them do we......


Rob

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44 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

Would it be possible to mark the areas where contact is being made on the inside of the skirts and use a Dremel or similar to carefully thin the plastic at strategic points?

 

Evening Rob. 

 

No need to mark it.........the crankpin does it for you on these. No added charge. 

 

Part of it is down to how the model is handled, part of it due to the gnat's todger of a gap along with a chunky head on the crankpin. 

 

First job is to make sure the side sheets are straight then consider gentle thinning of the head of the crankpin. 

 

Then there's the side to side movement of the axle when running to think about.......

 

One thing at a time though and to confirm this is a lot better than the last. 

 

Rob. 

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17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

 

Evening Rob. 

 

No need to mark it.........the crankpin does it for you on these. No added charge. 

 

Like an old bicycle chainguard. Excellent, saves faffing about with engineer's blue.

 

17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

 

Part of it is down to how the model is handled, part of it due to the gnat's todger of a gap along with a chunky head on the crankpin. 

 

I think I see part of the problem here.... Unless the body is dead square on the chassis and you are gentle about picking it up. In fact, don't pick it up, don't even look at it too hard. This is an investment quality piece for collectors and on no account should you have the philistinic thought of taking it out of the box....

 

17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

 

First job is to make sure the side sheets are straight then consider gentle thinning of the head of the crankpin. 

 

A little draw filing or grinding for the very brave might just cure the problem...

 

17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

 

Then there's the side to side movement of the axle when running to think about.......

 

Is it fitted with a Ford Capri back axle????

 

Tolerances? 

 

17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

One thing at a time though and to confirm this is a lot better than the last. 

 

A good thrash round a trainset oval might just wear off the offending material. At least it works, you'll sort it. In the words of St. Donald of Sutherland, in the gospel according to Kelly, leader of heroes: "Have a little faith baby, have a little faith..."

 

17 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

Rob. 

 

Another Rob.

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1 hour ago, wiggoforgold said:

One of my J70's had to go back at first. The v-g is susceptible to rough handling, As you say, the isn't much in the way of clearance and I suspected the problem occurred in assembly.

 

 

Morning Alex. 

 

Yes, most likely an assembly issue.  There really is no room for error and if the side sheets are squeezed in then there will be contact. Add into this the sideways movement of the axles when negotiating anything other than dead straight track and the problem becomes worse. 

 

Once this is identified and tweaked, the running really improves. However. I will look to take a file to the heads of the crank pin and apply a few light strokes. 

 

They really are very nice models but like many ilittle engines, they have their own characteristics.

 

Once I'm happy with the running, I can get on with the detailing/weathering.  

 

 

Rob. 

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  • NHY 581 changed the title to The Sheep Chronicles : Chapter 5: Outwool. A pastoral corner of the Wisbleat and Upwool.......The Sheep goes East. These are the continuing adventures of Norman Lockhart, connoisseur of traditional British breakfasts and fine cream teas.

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