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The Sheep Chronicles : These are the continuing adventures of a sheep, the Works Forecat, George the mischievous apprentice,and their official photographer, Norman Lockhart, connoisseur of traditional British breakfasts and well filled baps.


NHY 581
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1 hour ago, NHY 581 said:

Returning to the modelling world, I have just taken delivery of this book. 

 

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Ordered yesterday and apparently delivered in a smidge over 24hrs from Germany, the text is in German.

 

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However, it documents the techniques used by Emmanuel Nouaillier to create his wonderful scenes, long the source of much inspiration for the Sheep. 

 

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So out with Google translate and away we go. 

 

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For the princely sum of £15.99 including delivery, I am very impressed and looking forward to discovering a few new ways of doing things. 

 

Rob. 

 

You'll enjoy it believe me, so many things to consider and even with simple translations its a real goldmine for those of us who want to improve our modelling.

Great purchase, mine's getting slightly dog-eared now but still a good go-to.

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p.s.

 

I used an app on my iPhone that takes a photo of the text and gives an almost perfect English translation.

 

Interesting to see his use of materials which are mostly available to us in this country.

 

G

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Have to agree G. 

 

It is already added to the "favourite book' section. 

 

Much to be gleaned and I can only hope to emulate the type of finish EN achieves. 

 

I might not manage it on Project X, in fact I strongly suspect I won't but nothing ventured, nothing gained. 

 

Taking into account the text, definately one to acquire. Heartily recommended. 

 

Rob. 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

Have to agree G. 

 

It is already added to the "favourite book' section. 

 

Much to be gleaned and I can only hope to emulate the type of finish EN achieves. 

 

I might not manage it on Project X, in fact I strongly suspect I won't but nothing ventured, nothing gained. 

 

Taking into account the text, definately one to acquire. Heartily recommended. 

 

Rob. 

 

 

 

Quite a lot of articles by EN have been in the Continental modelling magazine that is produced in this country, so all in English. He does make use of a particular type of closed cell foam that seems to be crucially different to the ones available over here though. His micro painting is amazing but I dread to think how long it takes to do.

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9 minutes ago, simonmcp said:

Quite a lot of articles by EN have been in the Continental modelling magazine that is produced in this country, so all in English. He does make use of a particular type of closed cell foam that seems to be crucially different to the ones available over here though. His micro painting is amazing but I dread to think how long it takes to do.

 

 

Evening Simon. 

 

I have a few but even taking into account the translation thingy, I've got this book for roughly the cost of three CM's so good value in my eyes. 

 

Its the painting and finishing I am hoping to pick up but who knows if it will lead to scratch built buildings. 

 

 

Rob. 

 

 

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It's definitely a book that is going on my list of titles to look out for.  It is, as @woodenheadsays, 3 dimensional art. 

The only problem is when I get reading something like that, I start making things that I don't have a place for.

Although I do have an idea about making further modules for my layout which eventually terminates in a small ancient town.

 

I've managed to justify more layout building in a few sentences there!

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10 hours ago, Stubby47 said:

Strangely, I miss wearing a shirt & tie, not only since before Lockdown & WFH - I always had a sense of being professionally dressed and therefore had a professional attitude.  The current job is in a small-ish firm with no internal or external customers, so no need.

When I worked in Singapore, I was one of very few that wore a tie. When I was asked why, I replied that if I didn't wear a tie I didn't feel like doing any work.

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Following on from the excellent EM Detail book this channel may be in general interest to those who enjoy detailing / weathering techniques, although it's mainly American based this chap certainly gets to show off some useful work.

 

Worth scrolling through his videos if you have some time to spare.

 

https://www.youtube.com/c/JasonJensenTrains/videos

Edited by bgman
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16 hours ago, phil_sutters said:

In Zummerset when we lived over the wall from a farm yard, I am sure it wer boynder twoyne. I d'know thaat 'cos the farmer did give my Mum a gert big roll of't, t string up 'er runners.

 

On the subject of current dress protocols, have you noticed how many politicians and indeed TV reporters seem to have just grabbed a tie before coming on air and managed to get the knot off centre?

Simples - it's an age thing.  Binder twine came first because binders came before balers but then the world got all modern and combine harvesters (cue the music) arrived so that meant  balers were needed and balers used binder twine back in the early days.  Both my uncles used binder twine to hold up their (army surplus) trousers.

 

There were also the what would nowadays be called PPE uses of binder twine So when moving stuff into or out of the granary binder twine was applied around the bottom of the trousers to stop rats running up them.  The other important PPE use was to secure the old sacking round your legs below the knees when using a scythe and particularly when working in a group cutting with scythes.   I suppose the nearest modern equivalent to the latter is wearing kevlar strengthened trousers when using a chain saw.

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Afternoon,

 

I have to say I am pleased with my new purchase. Thanks to G, I am using the photo translate app thing and it's fab. 

 

I can wholeheartedly  recommend it and as previously stated, this book is a very useful addition to the modelling library. 

 

I can see I need to do some modelling, keep you lot occupied. 

 

So, I'm off to read, digest and try a few new techniques. 

 

Rob. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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In other news, there may well be a new loco arriving for Project X of which more anon. 

 

Something different for me to be sure and I think it will prove interesting for those who may be interested in such things . 

 

Very area specific. 

 

Rob. 

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26 minutes ago, NHY 581 said:

a new loco

 

Mine arrived at lunchtime, just running her in !

 

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Well...you can't have enough Panniers eh ? 

 

( Bit modern for me but it'll fit with the side project ).

 

Rob, glad you've had success with the translation app, nothing to stop you now matey ! 

 

G

 

 

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32 minutes ago, bgman said:

 

Mine arrived at lunchtime, just running her in !

 

IMG_4839.jpeg.328675abaac1da037a9aef809140f94d.jpeg

 

Well...you can't have enough Panniers eh ? 

 

( Bit modern for me but it'll fit with the side project ).

 

Rob, glad you've had success with the translation app, nothing to stop you now matey ! 

 

G

 

 

 

 

Minerva ? 

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1 hour ago, NHY 581 said:

 

 

Minerva ? 

 

Bless Ewe ! 

 

No 'tis one of Mr.Dapols and a really sweet runner straight out of the box.

I had a spare sound decoder now fitted which needs the speaker changing but other than that really happy with it.

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Recently attended the funeral of one of our club's founder members. The family suggested we should wear our club sweatshirts as the club had been a big part of his life. Seemed much nicer than assorted black clothing. Ron was a good modeller and it was nice to mark that.

 

Don

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52 minutes ago, bgman said:

 

Bless Ewe ! 

 

No 'tis one of Mr.Dapols and a really sweet runner straight out of the box.

I had a spare sound decoder now fitted which needs the speaker changing but other than that really happy with it.

 

 

It looks the part Grahame.  Needs weathering........

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1 hour ago, NHY 581 said:

It looks the part Grahame.  Needs weathering........

And unless he's going to keep it as a 67XX, I think he'll need to remove the vacuum and steam heating pipes and fit a 3-link coupling!
 

Nice rivets, though (even if you can hardly see 'em!) and correct for 6739.

 

 

 

 

 

Don't you just love a pedant?

 

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