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dseagull

Moving Ballast - What Wagons?

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Those who have been following my blog (Now resurrected after a spell of inactivity!) will know that I am in the process of building a 'might have been' line based very much in LBSCR territory. 

 

One of the main 'freight sources' for the line, according to my written history, is shingle from Cuckmere Haven (relevant blog entry here ). The LBSC used shingle as ballast (in reality from the Crumbles branch at Eastbourne), and so the railway itself would be the main customer of this. Question is, what sort of wagons would have been used for this in the, say, 1905-1914 period?

 

Many thanks in advance!

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The Brighton had two types of ballast wagon in this period - very small wooden low-sided ones and modern steel-bodied ballast hoppers. There are drawings of both types, together with the ballast brakes, in the Brighton volume of the Southern Wagons book.

Steve

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The Brighton had two types of ballast wagon in this period - very small wooden low-sided ones and modern steel-bodied ballast hoppers. There are drawings of both types, together with the ballast brakes, in the Brighton volume of the Southern Wagons book.

Steve

 

Thanks. I've seen the Chatham Kits er, kits(!) - http://www.roxeymouldings.co.uk/product/165/4f09-lbscr-short-wheelbase-ballast-wagon/and http://www.roxeymouldings.co.uk/product/166/4f10-lbscr-long-wheelbase-ballast-wagon/ - but I didn't know if these would have been just used for carrying ballast in what we'd now call 'engineers trains', rather than away from the point of extraction. 

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They probably put the ballast into ballast wagons at the point of extraction. Why handle it twice when once will do?

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They probably put the ballast into ballast wagons at the point of extraction. Why handle it twice when once will do?

 

Yes, fair point!

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The Roxey wagons are almost certainly what you are looking for. Although dumb buffered, they were only used on the company's own system and survived some time after the nominal abolition of dumb buffers on wagons in general traffic. The steel hopper wagons were a relatively late innovation.

Best wishes

Eric

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Many thanks Eric. I originally liked the look of the Cambrian SECR two-plank ballast wagons, but I am increasingly drawn to an earlier period than they were introduced.

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Just found the photo which shows how these vehicles should end up; three short and three long, loaded with chalk spoil.

post-9472-0-58056700-1422127797_thumb.jpg

Best wishes

Eric

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Just found the photo which shows how these vehicles should end up; three short and three long, loaded with chalk spoil.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/public/style_images/master/attachicon.gif2 Station view inc baseboard.JPG

Best wishes

Eric

Thanks Eric, that's terrific. Very nice layout too.

 

An earlier thread revealed that shingle was also used in the China making process. I'm assuming bog-standard open wagons for that?

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Thanks Eric, that's terrific. Very nice layout too.

 

An earlier thread revealed that shingle was also used in the China making process. I'm assuming bog-standard open wagons for that?

In BR days, they were; I wonder how this traffic was worked in earlier days to places like the Cheddleton Flint Mill?

http://www.cheddletonflintmill.com/

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Further to previous comments, the dumb-buffered wagons were built up until 1905, and a few hundred must have been made, as around 140 of various sorts survived to become Southern Railway property.  Around 1895 the LBSC built 50 useful multi-purpose rail/sleeper/ballast wagons with removable sides for the ballast, as per drawing in Southern Wagons, although I have never seen a photo of one being used for this type of load.  Around the turn of the century the obtained 30 of the iron hoppers mentioned earlier, and subsequently, from 1905, started building 15T capacity low sided wagons for ballast of surprisingly modern design (for the Brighton) of which 112 were built, making them almost as numerous as the dumb-buffered ones. 5&9 Models used to produce kits of these, and a photo of one can be seen on their website.

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