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But some period research is needed here. How much red wine was there on general sale in the west of Scotland at the beginning of the 20th century? Is bottled beer more likely? (Green bottles.) Or are we looking at spirits? (Clear or yellow.)

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Somewhere in the stacks of the University of Strathclyde's library will be a doctoral thesis on the drinking habits of early 20th century Glaswegians, with particular reference to location, income, social standing, and religious denomination.

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53 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Somewhere in the stacks of the University of Strathclyde's library will be a doctoral thesis on the drinking habits of early 20th century Glaswegians, with particular reference to location, income, social standing, and religious denomination.

Why just Strathclyde? What about THE University of Glasgow? 

 

Jim (BDS Glas.) 

 

{I have to be careful what I say. My wife is a graduate of Strathclyde and my grandson is studying at Glasgow Caledonian} 

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How were wines displayed back in the time portrayed?  My thought being some picture(s) might be utilised rather than a relief model. 
 

Edited by richbrummitt
wine thinking
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12 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

Why just Strathclyde? What about THE University of Glasgow? 

 

Jim (BDS Glas.) 

 

{I have to be careful what I say. My wife is a graduate of Strathclyde and my grandson is studying at Glasgow Caledonian} 

 

Strathclyde seemed to me (without doing any research) more likely to have the sort of unstuffy Social Studies Department that would produce such work. To declare my interest: my uncle was a founder member of the Geography Department at Stratclyde. I alluded to his A Geography of Scotland when I was rude about the Kirkallanmuir Fault.

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5 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

I alluded to his A Geography of Scotland when I was rude about the Kirkallanmuir Fault.

It wasn’t anybody’s fault, we’re all blameless here :jester:

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3 hours ago, Ian Smith said:

It wasn’t anybody’s fault, we’re all blameless here :jester:

It wisnae me!  :nono:  A big boy done it an' ran away!!  :dontknow:

 

I have a somewhat distant photo of the building in, I think, the early 1920's (It has the war memorial in it) and from what I can make out there is not much in the way of goods in the window. but a number of 'poster's on the rear wall.  I suspect these would be advertising the various what was available with just one or two bottle of each on display.  I doubt the proprietor would want to have toomuch of his stock tied up in a window display.

 

Thanks to @John57sharp and @Compound2632 for their suggestions, but the only micro rod I have is 10thou and the small amount of sprue I have is grey.   Experiments are ongoing and I will report in due course.

 

Jim

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Slow progress at the moment as some other things are taking up my time.   Modelling window displays is extremely fiddly and time consuming, but the wines and spirits window is now in place along with the door to the grocers.

 

1112684987_3Windows2.JPG.0d67672c4d1837967809b0438a01d28c.JPG

 

The display is mostly posters advertising the wares, but there are a dozen or so bottles.  These were made by filing a 'neck' on a piece of wire held in a pin vice and cutting it off to the required length.  They were then painted brown, or a very dark green with, of course, several in an amber colour.  Their bottoms were then dipped in some Easitrac glue before they were put in place.

 

Work is under way on the other window which will contain various cartons, bags and packets.

 

Jim

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That's the third window display in!  :dancer:347061965_3Windows3.JPG.fb2924a3a5adc96147f5beeaa2857ff7.JPG

 

As with the others it's just an attempt to create the impression of what would be there.  Dry goods were often received in bulk and then put into coloured paper bags by the shop, the colour of the bag indicating the contents.  For example sugar was in dark blue bags (I can't remember what was in green, brown, white, grey, etc.)  As with the other buildings there will be a card backing which will prevent you seeing right through!

 

Next to fit the gutters, roof panels and gable wall copings, all of which are cut ready.

 

Jim

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59 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

That's the third window display in!  :dancer:347061965_3Windows3.JPG.fb2924a3a5adc96147f5beeaa2857ff7.JPG

 

As with the others it's just an attempt to create the impression of what would be there.  Dry goods were often received in bulk and then put into coloured paper bags by the shop, the colour of the bag indicating the contents.  For example sugar was in dark blue bags (I can't remember what was in green, brown, white, grey, etc.)  As with the other buildings there will be a card backing which will prevent you seeing right through!

 

Next to fit the gutters, roof panels and gable wall copings, all of which are cut ready.

 

Jim

 

One of my Great Uncles ran a grocers shop. Lots of stuff was weighed out and put in paper bags.  Auntie was relieved when they sold up and retired no more eating up the cracked eggs, the limp vegetables, the stale cheese  etc. Things like carrots, potatoes etc. would be in sacks and again weighed out. There were no plastic bags greaseproof paper was used for anything that was greasy or oily. Fascinating place for a small boy to visit.

 

Don

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6 hours ago, richard i said:

Really impressive shop frontages. Turned 2mm wine bottles, now I have heard it all. 

Thanks, Richard.  There are not just wine bottles.  Some contain amber nectar!  :)

 

Jim

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Gutters fitted, roof on, stonework finished and painted.

 

1588450367_3roofed.JPG.7cccce567a9b260a011d030847c6a831.JPG

 

Slaters are about to start work!

 

Jim

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Thanks, @richard i.  Although none of the buildings are exact copies of any, but mostly 'inspired by', my objective was to create something which was believable.

 

Jim

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9 hours ago, Sithlord75 said:

I don't envy the house wife walking up the hill carrying the spuds!  Very nice it looks Jim.  Well done.

Housewives around here were made of strong stuff in the late 1800's - early 1900's!  Lanark High Street is a fair slope!

image.png.575db0d94c5968ddcf01532cdd0e92e8.png

 

Some streets in Coatbridge, where I was in practice, were steeper than that!

 

Jim

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When I was living in Palmers Flat is was steeper than that. A colleague for work was picking me up fo a meeting. Its is halfway up the hill on the left. She was late. Couldn't find the hill she said.....   Well she did live in the Welsh valleys their concept of  a hill is somewhat different. 

 

Don

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Now taken the board back out to the garage, attached it to the layout and fitted all the buildings in place.

 

From the goods yard end -

1752386659_StationRoad2.JPG.d79ff2d7c5ea2506613cbd01d16c5bc2.JPG

 

And from the opposite direction (from round about where the church will be) -1624943745_StationRoad3.JPG.8094cccb515ccc059fe9357495e41147.JPG

 

B****y cold out in the garage tonight, even though it is attached to the house and has the central heating boiler in it!

Jim

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1 hour ago, Caley Jim said:

Now taken the board back out to the garage, attached it to the layout and fitted all the buildings in place.

 

From the goods yard end -

1752386659_StationRoad2.JPG.d79ff2d7c5ea2506613cbd01d16c5bc2.JPG

 

And from the opposite direction (from round about where the church will be) -1624943745_StationRoad3.JPG.8094cccb515ccc059fe9357495e41147.JPG

 

B****y cold out in the garage tonight, even though it is attached to the house and has the central heating boiler in it!

Jim

 

Really sets it off nicely I hadn't realised that the yard was across the road from that row of buildings and I am assuming there are storage loops/fiddle yard behind them.

 

Don

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Posted (edited)

Thanks, @Donw. Yes the cassette area at this end is behind the buildings and is where the station is imagined to be. The end of the island platform can just be seen under the bridge.

 

Jim 

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Hi Jim, I lIke your little offlicence is that a bottle of Talisker or Glen Morangie in the window. Yes the weather is cold now weve had some snow this morning at Gatwick . keep warm soon be able to get out and about .Regads Ray.

 

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3 hours ago, Trewisin said:

Hi Jim, I lIke your little offlicence is that a bottle of Talisker or Glen Morangie in the window.

Thanks, Ray.  It might even be Bruichladich or Bunnahabhain for the cognoscenti!  Sprinkle of snow here as well this morning.

 

Slainte

 

Jim

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